eastman-house.jpgRochester, N.Y. - Take a look at the great films, exhibitions and discussions taking place at the George Eastman House's Dryden Theatre in March. You might also like to treat yourself like a VIP and attend the Dryden's March 7 Academy Awards® Party! 4           Thursday, 8 p.m. FILM EVENT        Filmmaker Naomi Uman in person! A major figure in contemporary American avant-garde cinema, Uman's work has been shown at film festivals worldwide. Her handcrafted work explores concepts of solitude, community, and a sense of belonging. Uman will introduce and discuss her work, as the Dryden Theatre screens four of her earliest and most recent works. Regular Dryden admission: $7 general admission/$5 members and students. 7           Sunday, 7 p.m. ACADEMY AWARDS® PARTY 2010 Party like Hollywood stars at George Eastman House's premier red-carpet bash -- at the home of the father of motion picture film. Experience the Oscars® ceremony on the big screen in the 500-seat Dryden Theatre. Dance to Nik and the Nice Guys in the mansion, enjoy refreshments and live entertainment, and bid on exciting silent-auction items. Advance tickets $50 ($60 day of event). Tickets are available at eastmanhouse.org or (585) 271-3361 ext. 444. Star sponsors are Frontier and COMIDA. 14         Sunday              EXHIBITION CLOSING Today is the last day to view the exhibition How Do We Look?, which features a view of Rochester through the lens of three internationally renowned photographers - Kristen Ashburn, Pep Bonet, and Eli Reed. Included with museum admission. 14         Sunday, 3 to 4 p.m. MUSICALE A performance by Kathy Wilkins in the Living Room featuring Celtic music, as Eastman House presents Sunday afternoon musicales like George Eastman used to. Included with museum admission. 18-21    Thursday-Sunday             FILM SYMPOSIUM "Film Lost and Found: The Experience of Pre-and Silent Cinema" is a symposium sponsored by the Humanities Project of the University of Rochester's College of Arts, Sciences, and Engineering, in collaboration with George Eastman House and the Eastman School of Music. Events include The Living Nickelodeon, a free performance at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 18, at Eastman School of Music, Room 120, 26 Gibbs St.; a free talk about the history of film accompaniment, at 4 p.m. Friday, March 19, Eastman School of Music, Ciminelli Lounge, 100 Gibbs St.; The Poor Little Rich Girl (1917), starring Mary Pickford, at 8 p.m. Friday, March 19, at Eastman House's Dryden Theatre (admission $15/$10 members and students; a free magic lantern show at 4 p.m. Saturday, March 20, at Hubbell Auditorium, University of Rochester River Campus; a free motion picture collections panel discussion followed by archive tours at 1 p.m. Sunday, March 21, at George Eastman House (space is limited); and a celebration of the vitaphone with screenings at the Dryden Theatre at  3 pm.. Sunday, March 21 ($7/$5 students). Learn more at www.rochester.edu/college/humanities/projects/index.php?silentcinema. 20            Saturday EXHIBITION OPENING Persistent Shadow: Considering the Photographic Negativeopens today in the Entrance Gallery. George Eastman House focuses on the negative in this exhibition drawn from its collections. The anchor will be a display of prints from a recently acquired portfolio by John Loengard, legendary photographer and editor at LIFE Magazine. The negatives range from Alexander Gardner's Abraham Lincoln, 1863, photographed at the National Portrait Gallery, to Eastman House's iconic portrait of Babe Ruth by Nicholas Muray. Included with museum admission. 20            Saturday, 8 p.m. FILM EVENT Filmmaker Samantha Buck in person, to kick off  the 360 | 365 George Eastman House Film Festival's New Director Series. Buck's 21 Below, filmed on location on Buffalo,tells the richly complex and inspiring story of an American family in crisis. Buck will answer questions after this screening. Regular Dryden admission: $7/$5 members and students. 23            Tuesday, 8 p.m. Silent film comedy scholar Richard M. Roberts in person. Roberts, author of an upcoming book on Hal Roach, will be your guide through a garden of comic delights. Roach was a native of Elmira, N.Y., and of Hollywood's great comedy pioneers. He was renowned for his hilarious two-reel productions and an uncanny knack for spotting brilliant physical comedians. This program includes one of the earliest Our Gang shorts and the work of Stan Laurel and Oliver Hardy. Regular Dryden admission: $7/$5 members and students. 24            Thursday, 6 p.m. PHOTOGRAPHY LECTURE/"WISH YOU WERE HERE" Douglas Kirkland in person! An illustrated lecture with the official photographer on the set of hundreds of films, from The Sound of Music to Titanic and beyond. Part of the popular Wish You Were Here photography lecture series, whch brings world-renowned photographers and photographic experts to the Dryden Theatre. Booksigning to follow, with books available in the Eastman House Store. Included with museum admission. 28         Sunday, 3 to 4 p.m. MUSICALE A performance by Eun Mi Ko on piano and Sini Virtanen on violin in the Living Room, as Eastman House presents Sunday afternoon musicales like George Eastman used to. Included with museum admission.

CONTINUING EXHIBITIONS MARCH 2010   How Do We Look?                                                         Through March 14, 2010 Entrance Gallery Peristent Shadow:                                                           Opens March 20, 2010/ongoing        Considering the the Photographic Negative                  Entrance Gallery Roger Ballen: Photographs, 1982-2009                        Through June 6, 2010                                                                             Brackett Clark Gallery Portrait                                                                           Ongoing                                                                             South Gallery What We're Collecting Now:                                           Ongoing The Family Photographed                                              New Acquisitions Gallery     Cameras from the                                                            Ongoing Technology Collection                                                     North Gallery     Where Do Cameras Come From?                                    Ongoing Second floor of house     The Remarkable George Eastman                                  Ongoing                                                                                          Second floor of house

DRYDEN THEATRE FILM CALENDAR MARCH 2010 Please note: Sunday films are screened at 7 p.m. unless otherwise noted. Films listed begin at 8 p.m. in the Dryden Theatre, except for Sunday evening films, which begin at 7 p.m., and those otherwise noted. Dryden Theatre general admission tickets are $7 and George Eastman House members and student ticket rates are $5, unless otherwise noted. "Take-10" discount tickets (10 admissions for $55/$40 members and students) are available at the box office and the Museum Shop. The film program is partially funded by the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York State Council on the Arts.

FEATURED FILM SERIES

COMFORT AND JOY: THE BITTERSWEET COMEDIES OF BILL FORSYTH Melancholy is not an emotion that we usually associate with comedies, at least not in the laugh-a-minute, chortle-every-10-seconds type of movies that most audiences have come to expect from the genre. It takes a rare type of film artist to discover the almost inexpressible wistful sadness and small sense of loss behind the laughter and triumphs of comedic characters. Such an artist is the Scottish writer and director Bill Forsyth, whose sublime brand of filmmaking will be on display in the Dryden during March and April, when we present the first complete North American retrospective of his features. Forsyth will join us in person for screenings of his lovely movies, Local Hero and Housekeeping. Beginning his career in documentaries, Forsyth made his feature debut in 1980 with a low-budget comedy about a group of Glaswegian teenagers (played by members of Glasgow Youth Theatre) who relieve their boredom by stealing sinks and plumbing supplies. The four main actors in That Sinking Feeling (which wasn't released in the U.S. until 1984) were all cast in Forsyth's sophomore effort, Gregory's Girl, the story of a teenage boy's fixation on the first female member of his school's soccer team. These decidedly quirky first two features are youth comedies populated by unusually wise, even philosophical, youngsters, who make the bittersweet discovery that you can't always get what you want. The international success of Gregory's Girl paved the way for Forsyth's next-and best-loved-movie, Local Hero. Though produced with support from Warner Bros. and starring two American actors (Peter Riegert and Burt Lancaster), Local Hero is remembered today for its unique Scottish-ness and a subtle but ahead-of-its-time message on protecting our natural environment (it's Al Gore's favorite movie). Like Mac, the humbled oil executive hero of Local Hero, radio d.j. Dicky Bird in Comfort and Joy is another foiled romantic who finds himself embroiled in a misadventure; specifically, a war between Glasgow ice cream vendors. When the producer of Local Hero, David Putnam, was briefly named head of Columbia Pictures, he provided Forsyth the opportunity to make his first American movie. The result was the haunting and criminally neglected masterpiece Housekeeping, starring Christine Lahti as the eccentric guardian of two orphaned girls. Forsyth completed two more wonderful and underseen comedies in the U.S., Breaking In, starring Burt Reynolds and Casey Siemaszko as a professional burglar and his inexperienced protégé, and Being Human, featuring Robin Williams as five characters (or is it just one?) who learn through 10,000 years of history and heartbreak what it means to be alive. It's been more than a decade since Forsyth completed his last feature, Gregory's 2Girls, a sequel to one of his earlier successes that returned him to filming in Scotland. His body of work reminds us that there's a lot of comfort and joy and beautiful melancholy to be derived from life's ordinariness. Some might say there's no room for his subtle, quiet style of storytelling in a world dominated by increasingly bombastic popular culture, but seeing these films just might remind you that we need Bill Forsyth now more than ever. -Jim Healy, Assistant Curator, Exhibitions, Motion Picture Department The films of the Bill Forsyth series: All films are at 8 p.m. unless otherwise indicated Thursday, March 11 THAT SINKING FEELING (Bill Forsyth, UK/Scotland 1979, 92 min.) Sunday, March 14/two films for one admission price 7 p.m. GREGORY'S GIRL (Bill Forsyth, UK 1981, 91 min.) 8:45 p.m. GREGORY'S 2GIRLS (Bill Forsyth, UK 1999, 111 min., Digital Projection) Thursday, March 18 COMFORT AND JOY (Bill Forsyth, UK 1984, 105 min.) Thursday, March 25 BREAKING IN (Bill Forsyth, US 1989, 91 min.) Thursday, April 1 BEING HUMAN (Bill Forsyth, UK/US 1994, 122 min.) Bill Forsyth in person for two screenings! Saturday, April 10 7 p.m. LOCAL HERO (Bill Forsyth, UK 1983, 111 min.) AND Sunday, April 11 HOUSEKEEPING (Bill Forsyth, US 1987, 116 min.) JACQUES TATI, MR. HULOT, AND THE CHALLENGES OF MODERNITY Jacques Tati was briefly a professional rugby player, music-hall mime, and actor in short films before he began to direct his own. He translated his athleticism and miming into the physical comedy of the alter ego he would play in most of his feature films, Monsieur Hulot. With his too-short trousers, striped socks, pipe, and umbrella, Hulot was a French counterpart to silent comedy personae like Chaplin and Keaton. Despite his everyman countenance, Hulot managed to inadvertently leave disaster in his wake. Indeed his epic struggles to navigate the latest technology will resonate with Luddites everywhere.  Though Tati produced only a handful of feature films, his iconoclastic aesthetics, exploration of class politics, refusal to work with professional actors, and view of a newly modern and consumerist postwar France gained him international acclaim as an auteur. Tati achieved notoriety for his revolutionary approach to sound design. He typically set dialogue at the same pitch as environmental noise, boosted sound effects meant to enhance sight gags, and recorded complex layers of interrelated effects, music, and ambient sound to correspond perfectly with visual cues, producing cinematic synaesthesia. Oddly, his films were not as popular in France as they were abroad. Nevertheless, they inspired fellow French film giants like Robert Bresson and François Truffaut. The New York Times contends that Tati was "an unlikely and aloof member of the French New Wave" and suggests that his slapstick humor functions as a socio-cultural commentary in much the same fashion as Jean Luc Godard's Marxist mantras. Tati, who explains his comedic skill as the product of keen observational skills, applied the same logic to his films. In March, the Dryden Theatre will present the complete features (and one program of short films screening on March 3) of this filmmaker many consider to be the foremost chronicler of urban postwar France. Tati's first feature, Jour de fête (March 10), revolves around the trials and travails of a bumbling village postman who, inspired by drink and a documentary about the modernist efficiency of the American postal service, hatches a series of experiments to speed up his own delivery by bicycle.Tati introduced Hulot in Mr. Hulot's Holiday (screening in a newly restored print on March 12 and 14), in which the hero has disastrous interactions with bourgeois sun worshippers at a seaside resort. Inthe Oscar®-winning Mon Oncle (March 17), Tati's best-known work, Hulot is uncle to a nephew being raised in a modernist house outfitted with the latest devices designed to economize time and labor. Tati's third feature,Playtime (March 21), finds Hulot challenged by modernity in the city of Paris, which Tati completely fabricated on a massive set built on the outskirts of the actual city. Both films concern the alienating effects of postwar France's obsession with modernist architecture and urban design, the proliferation of technology, and American-style conspicuous consumerism. In Trafic (March 24), Hulot is an automobile inventor and the focal point of "a satire on mankind's ill-fated love-affair with the motor car." Tati's final film, Parade (March 31), appropriately enough, brings his career full circle in that it is a document of a circus/music-hall performance featuring the director's own mime acts.                   -Dinah Holtzman, Assistant Film Programmer, Motion Picture Department 360 | 365 GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE FILM FESTIVAL PRESENTS NEW DIRECTOR SERIES: 21 BELOW and SAMANTHA BUCK IN PERSON! George Eastman House has joined with 360 | 365 (formerly the High Falls Film Festival) to bring you the 360 | 365 George Eastman House Film Festival, a five-day paradise for movie lovers May 5 to 10 at the Dryden and Little Theatres. Additionally, the Dryden will be home to the 360 | 365 George Eastman House New Director Series, a bi-monthly program that will present the first area screenings of recent works from directors making their first or second feature-length effort. The New Director Series begins March 20 with 21 Below, an emotionally powerful new documentary filmed largely in Buffalo. 21 Below tells the compelling and multi-faceted story of one American family in crisis. Pregnant with her first child, Sharon returns to Buffalo to repair the relationship between her mother and her younger sister, Karen, who is pregnant with her third child and caring for one daughter dying from a rare genetic disease. Richly complex and inspiring, 21 Below unfolds as a compassionate portrait of a family coming apart and the compromises required for reconciliation. Director Samantha Buck will appear in person to introduce and answer questions after the screening. No Take-10 tickets or passes. ROCHESTER EXCLUSIVES IN MARCH In addition to 21 Below and Daytime Drinking, the Dryden is the only local venue that will offer theatrical screenings of these recently released acclaimed features and documentaries: HOME - March 5 THE SUN - March 6 WHAT'S THE MATTER WITH KANSAS - March 13 THE MAID - March 26 and 28 ERIC ROHMER R.I.P. A founding member of the French nouvelle vague and a staple of international art house cinema for nearly half a century, Eric Rohmer died at age 89 on Jan. 11, 2010. We'll pay tribute to this master of the sublime with two consecutive nights of screenings. We'll start with Full Moon in Paris (March 8), one of the most revered in Rohmer's series of "Comedies and Proverbs." Then we'll present an enormously rare screening of Rohmer's The Tree, The Mayor and the Mediatheque (March 9), a satirical comedy of politics and bureaucracy in a provincial town. The screening of The Tree, The Mayor and the Mediatheque has been arranged through the generous support of Delphine Selles-Alvarez, Program Officer, Cinema, Cultural Services of the French Embassy. SILENT CINEMA Our annual season of films from cinema's earliest era continues on most Tuesdays in March and April. From Sweden arrives The Phantom Chariot (screening March 2), a haunting and influential fable by Victor Sjöström. One of the very few Japanese actors to make a successful transition to Hollywood features was Sessue Hayakawa, who will be featured in O Mimi San and The Devil's Claim (both screening on March 16). On March 23, we'll offer a cavalcade of comedy shorts from the legendary producer Hal Roach, starring his most popular performers: Laurel and Hardy, Charley Chase, and Our Gang. Marlene Dietrich, in one of her few silent film appearances, stars in the German classic, I Kiss Your Hand, Madame (March 30). W.C. Fields's considerable gift for pantomime is on display in So's Your Old Man (April 6). The early days of an enduring genre will be examined in a short film selection entitled Broncho Billy and Beyond: Early Westerns (April 13). Rochester's own Louise Brooks stars alongside Richard Arlen and the burly Wallace Beery in William Wellman's Beggars of Life (April 20). Each of these programs will feature live piano accompaniment from Philip C. Carli. The series concludes April 27 with a screening of the recently restored, once-lost foreign version of Lewis Milestone's remarkable anti-war epic, All Quiet on the Western Front, preserved by the Library of Congress. This dialogue-free version, featuring a music score on the soundtrack, is often thought to be superior to the talkie version we know best today. See it for yourself to decide! In addition, on March 19 the Dryden will present a special screening of Mary Pickford in The Poor Little Rich Girl, accompanied by a new score composed by Philip Carli and performed by the Flour City Orchestra. This special event is sponsored by the Humanities Project of the University of Rochester's College of Arts, Sciences, and Engineering, in collaboration with George Eastman House and the Eastman School of Music. (Special ticket prices for March 19: $15, $10 members and students) March Film Calendar All films presented in 35mm, unless otherwise noted. 1 MON 1:30 p.m. SENIOR MATINEE (free to those age 60 and over) MILDRED PIERCE (1945, Michael Curtiz, 111 min.) 2 TUE 8 p.m. Silent Cinema THE PHANTOM CHARIOT (KÖRKARLEN, Victor Sjöström, Sweden 1921, 90 min.) One of the towering achievements of silent cinema, director Sjöström's (The Wind, He Who Gets Slapped) allegory is based on a Swedish legend that the last person to die each year must drive the chariot that collects the dead. When an inebriated brawler dies at midnight on New Year's Eve, he is given the chance to review and correct his life's errors. Shot entirely on elaborate studio sets, The Phantom Chariot employs a complex and innovative flashback structure and a haunting, poetic style of double exposures and superimpositions that blend with the universality of its theme. Live piano by Philip C. Carli. 3 WED Jacques Tati 8 p.m. THE MAGNIFICENT TATI (Michael House, UK 2009, 60 min.) 9 p.m. Short Films by Jacques Tati (70 min.) Through film clips and interviews with experts, The Magnificent Tati reveals the life and times of the brilliant comic filmmaker Jacques Tati. Then, three rare short films, all starring and scripted by the French funnyman: In SOIGNE TON GAUCHE (René Clement, France 1936, 20 min., French w/subtitles), Tati appears as a farmer who unfortunately realizes his dream of becoming a boxer; in SCHOOL FOR POSTMEN (L'ÉCOLE DES FACTEURS, Jacques Tati, France 1947, 20 min., French w/subtitles), a dry-run for Jour de Fete, in which Tati plays a letter carrier who aspires to be as fast as American mailmen; and EVENING CLASSES (COURS DE SOIR, Nicolas Ribowski, France 1967, 30 min., French w/subtitles), in which Tati displays his amazing talents for pantomime for a group of unenthusiastic students. 4 THU 8 p.m. Naomi Uman in person! REMOVES (US 1999, 5 min.) THE TIN WOODMAN'S HOME MOVIE #2: CALIFORNIA POPPY RESERVE, ANTELOPE VALLEY (Naomi Uman & Lee Lynch, US 2008, 6 min.) KALENDAR (FROM UKRAINIAN TIME MACHINE SERIES) (US 2008, 11 min.) UNNAMED FILM (FROM UKRAINIAN TIME MACHINE SERIES) (US 2008, 50 min.) A major figure in contemporary American avant-garde cinema, Naomi Uman's work has been shown at film festivals worldwide. Her handcrafted work explores concepts of solitude, community, and a sense of belonging. This program presents a sample of her earliest and most recent works, including two parts of The Ukrainian Time Machine, which was shot on location near her ancestors' hometown in the Ukraine, where the filmmaker currently resides. Uman will introduce and discuss her work. Co-presented by George Eastman House, the Central New York Programmers Group, and the Department of English, the Program in Film and Media Studies, and the Graduate Program in Visual and Cultural Studies at the University of Rochester. 5 FRI 8 p.m. Rochester Exclusive. HOME (Ursula Meier, Belgium 2008, 98 min., French/subtitles) Isabelle Huppert and Olivier Gourmet star as the middle-class parents of three children living peacefully in a house along an abandoned stretch of highway. When the road is re-opened, the family suffers a number of inconveniences and violations of privacy, placing them on a downward spiral toward madness. This fascinating and beautifully acted psychological drama of displacement shares more than a few similarities with the work of Michael Haneke. 6 SAT 8 p.m. Rochester Exclusive. THE SUN (SOLNTSE, Alexander Sokurov, Russia 2005, 110 min. English & Japanese/subtitles) August 15, 1945: A shocked Japan hears the voice of divine leader Emperor Hirohito (Issey Ogata) for the first time, as he implores his people to cease all military activity, initiating a formal end to WWII and the beginning of a new period of American Occupation, led by Gen. Douglas MacArthur (Robert Dawson). Acclaimed Russian filmmaker Alexander Sokurov (Russian Ark) creates an incisive, eerie portrait of the enigmatic Hirohito during the twilight of the war. Co-presented by George Eastman House and the M.K. Gandhi Institute at the University of Rochester in conjunction with the Season of Nonviolence (January 30-April 4). The first 100 attendees will receive either a free M.K. Gandhi Institute t-shirt or poster. 8 MON 1:30 p.m. SENIOR MATINEE (free to those age 60 and over) ALICE ADAMS (1935, George Stevens, 99 min.) 8 MON. 8 p.m. R.I.P. Eric Rohmer FULL MOON IN PARIS (LES NUITS DE LA PLEINE LUNE, Eric Rohmer, France 1984, 102 min., French/subtitles) The marvelous and delicately heartbreaking fourth entry in director Rohmer's "Comedies and Proverbs" series centers on a heroine (Pascale Ogier) who lives with a lover in the suburbs of Paris. When she takes a small apartment in town as a way of asserting her freedom, she upsets the delicate equilibrium that has provided her with a measure of happiness. 9 TUES. 8 p.m. R.I.P. Eric Rohmer THE TREE, THE MAYOR AND THE MEDIATHEQUE (L'ARBRE, LE MAIRE ET LA MEDIATHEQUE, Eric Rohmer, France 1993, 105 min., French/subtitles) Rohmer's pointed comedy stars Pascal Gregory as the Socialist mayor of a small French village who secures government funding to build a showy media arts center on a picturesque, pastoral patch of land, something the local schoolmaster (Fabrice Luchini) and his pre-teen daughter won't abide. Never released in America, don't miss this rare opportunity to see one of Rohmer's most personal movies. 10 WED 8 p.m. Jacques Tati JOUR DE FÊTE (Jacques Tati, France 1949, 80 min., French with subtitles)Tati's first feature as director and star casts the legendary, lanky comedian as a postman whose attempts to make his delivery route more efficient result in a series of brilliantly timed gags. The poetic glimpses of tiny village life during a Bastille Day celebration are priceless. Seen for many years only in black-and-white versions, this edition restores the original color cinematography. 11 THU 8 p.m. Bill Forsyth. THAT SINKING FEELING (Bill Forsyth, UK/Scotland 1979, 92 min.) Before he charmed the world with Local Hero and Gregory's Girl, Scottish director Forsyth gave us this witty and charming portrait of a group of Glaswegian teenagers who relieve their boredom by stealing sinks and plumbing supplies. An absurd and sublimely detailed delight that continually surprises. 12 FRI 8 p.m. Jacques Tati. New 35mm restored print! MR. HULOT'S HOLIDAY (LES VACANCES DE MONSIEUR HULOT, Jacques Tati, France 1953, 88 min., French/subtitles) In the classic, much-loved movie that revealed his multi-layered comedic style, Tati first appears as the clumsy rain-coated, pipe-smoking title character. Taking a beach holiday in the South of France, Hulot gets caught up in a parade of slapstick sequences that provide us the vicarious enjoyment of his (mis)adventures. Tati's unique visual gags and ingenious sound design reinforce the delights of the cinema as they remind us of the piquant absurdities of modern life. This new 35mm restoration allows viewing of Tati's definitive version. 13 SAT 8 p.m. Rochester Exclusive WHAT'S THE MATTER WITH KANSAS (Joe Winston, US 2009, 90 min., Digital Projection) Inspired by the book by journalist Thomas Frank, this new documentary seeks to discover why conservatives in the former staunchly left-wing heartland state of Kansas persuade themselves to vote against their own economic and social well-being. Focusing attention on a number of Kansans, the film examines how political positions frequently dovetail with evangelical Christian doctrine, leading to the acceptance of hardships as the will of God. "What's interesting is that every single person in this film is seen as themselves, is allowed to speak and seems to have a good heart. I've rarely seen a documentary quite like it. It has a point to make but no ax to grind." (Roger Ebert) 14 SUN  5 p.m. MR. HULOT'S HOLIDAY. See March 12. Bill Forsyth Double Feature! 7 p.m. GREGORY'S GIRL (Bill Forsyth, UK 1981, 91 min.) 8:45 p.m. GREGORY'S 2GIRLS (Bill Forsyth, UK 1999, 111 min., Digital Projection) The affably understated actor John Gordon Sinclair grows up before our eyes as Gregory Underwood, the charming central character in this pair of romantic comedies made 18 years apart by Scottish filmmaker Bill Forsyth. In Gregory's Girl, our teenage hero is driven to distraction by the first female to join his school's football team. Gregory's 2Girls finds the now 35-year old Gregory teaching English at his old school and torn between a sexy young pupil and an equally enticing woman his own age. Two films for one admission price. 15 MON 1:30 p.m. SENIOR MATINEE (free to those age 60 and over) CHRISTMAS IN CONNECTICUT(1945, Peter Godfrey, 102 min.) 16 TUE 8 p.m. Silent Cinema. O MIMI SAN (Charles Miller, US 1914, 20 min.) THE DEVIL'S CLAIM (Charles Swickard, US 1920, 60 min.) The great Japanese performer Sessue Hayakawa stars in this pair of unusual silent-era melodramas. In O Mimi San, the actor's first movie, he plays a prince torn between love and duty to his nation. The Devil's Claim features Hayakawa in a dual role as a turban-wearing writer in love with Persian damsel Colleen Moore, and the possessed-by-an-evil-spirit main character in the writer's serial story. Live piano by Philip C. Carli. 17 WED 8 p.m. Jacques Tati. MON ONCLE (Jacques Tati, France 1958, 116 min.) Monsieur Hulot, Tati's blundering comic creation, returns in his second vehicle, an Oscar®-winner for Best Foreign Film. A sincere pragmatist, Hulot visits his sister's ultra-contemporary home and grapples uproariously with all its modern "conveniences." An enduring satire on technological gadgetry, Tati reminds us that "all serious things should be smiled out of existence and ... funny things are ultimately matters for serious thought."-Richard W. Nason, The New York Times. 18 THU 8 p.m. Bill Forsyth. COMFORT AND JOY (Bill Forsyth, UK 1984, 105 min.) In writer/director Forsyth's subtly silly follow-up to Local Hero, deft comic actor Bill Paterson stars as a radio d.j. who, rejected in love, finds himself at the center of a war being waged by two families of Italian ice-cream merchants. Sweet and unpredictable, this is one of Forsyth's funniest and most underrated efforts. 19 FRI 8 p.m. Special Presentation THE POOR LITTLE RICH GIRL (Maurice Tourneur, US 1917, 65 min.) America's sweetheart Mary Pickford stars as Gwendolyn, the unhappy daughter of wealthy and neglectful parents. When a crisis is started by a bullying and irresponsible servant, the family is forced to rethink what is important to them. The visual invention of talented director Maurice Tourneur will be accompanied by a new score composed by Rochester's own Philip C. Carli, and performed by Carli and the Flower City Orchestra. The feature will be preceded by several short silent films with new music composed by students from the Eastman School of Music. This special event is sponsored by the Humanities Project of the University of Rochester's College of Arts, Sciences, and Engineering, in collaboration with George Eastman House and the Eastman School of Music. Special ticket prices: $15, $10 members and students. No Take-10 tickets or passes. 20 SAT 8 p.m. 360 | 365 New Directors Series. Samantha Buck in person! 21 BELOW (Samantha Buck, US 2009, 91 min., Digital Projection) Filmed on location in Buffalo, 21 Below tells the compelling and multi-faceted story of one American family in crisis. Pregnant with her first child, Sharon returns to Buffalo in an attempt to repair the relationship between her mother and her younger sister, Karen, who is pregnant with her third child and caring for a daughter afflicted with the rare Tay-Sachs disease. Richly complex and inspiring, 21 Below unfolds as a compassionate portrait of a family coming apart and the compromises required for reconciliation. Director Samantha Buck will answer questions after this screening. No Take-10 tickets or passes. 21 SUN  3 p.m. A Vitaphone Celebration! WHEN A MAN LOVES (HIS LADY, Alan Crosland, US 1927, 111 min.) John Barrymore and Dolores Costello star in the best version of Abbé Prévost's oft-filmed Manon Lescaut, the love story of a divinity student (Barrymore) and a beautiful girl (Costello), whose brother (Warner Oland) has sold her to a lecherous aristocrat. One of the earliest sound films (released before The Jazz Singer, also directed by Crosland), When A Man Loves' original Vitaphone soundtrack has been restored in a joint project by George Eastman House, the UCLA Film & Television Archive, and Warner Bros. The feature will be preceded by three Vitaphone shorts: Quartet from Rigoletto (1927), Charles Hackett (1927), and Van and Schenck: The Pennant-winning Battery of Songland (1927). This special event is sponsored by the Humanities Project of the University of Rochester's College of Arts, Sciences, and Engineering, in collaboration with George Eastman House and the Eastman School of Music. 21 SUN  7 p.m. Jacques Tati. PLAYTIME (Jacques Tati, France/Italy 1967, 121 min., French with subtitles) Tati's beloved Monsieur Hulot finds himself in a futuristic funhouse of modern architecture and traffic jams as his once-familiar Paris progresses uncontrollably. Hulot adapts to his new surroundings like a fish out of water, which of course sets the stage for his charming and irresistible clumsiness. Often referenced for his accomplishments in achieving astonishing visual complexity and multiplicity, Tati also knew how to manipulate the soundtrack to achieve the aural equivalent of slipping on a banana peel. 22 MON 1:30 p.m. SENIOR MATINEE (free to those age 60 and over) THE BAND WAGON(1953, Vincente Minnelli, 111 min.) 23 TUES. 8 p.m. Silent Cinema. Richard M. Roberts in person! Calling All Cuckoos: Slapstick Masterpieces from the Hal Roach Studios One of Hollywood's great comedy pioneers, producer Hal Roach-a native of Elmira, NY-was renowned for his hilarious two-reel productions and his uncanny knack for spotting brilliant physical comedians. This program highlights his greatest performers, including Stan Laurel, featured in the solo vehicle ORANGES AND LEMONS (George Jeske, US 1923, 12 min.) and teamed with his ubiquitous partner Oliver Hardy in SHOULD MARRIED MEN GO HOME (Leo McCarey and James Parrott, US 1928, 20 min.). Charley Chase stars in THE CARETAKER'S DAUGHTER (Leo McCarey, US 1925, 20 min.); Max Davidson makes THE CALL OF THE CUCKOO (Clyde Bruckman, US 1927, 17 min.); and THE CHAMPEEN (Robert F. McGowan, US 1923, 20 min.) is one of the earliest Our Gang shorts. Silent film comedy scholar Richard M. Roberts, author of an upcoming book on Hal Roach, will be your guide through this garden of comic delights. Live piano by Philip C. Carli. 24 WED 8 p.m. Jacques Tati. trafic  (Jacques Tati, France 1971, 97 min., French/subtitles) In his final feature film appearance, Tati's bumbling Monsieur Hulot takes to Paris's highways and byways. Hulot, employed as an auto company's director of design, accompanies his new vehicle (a camper tricked out with absurd gadgetry) to an auto show in Amsterdam. Naturally, the road is paved with modern-age mishaps. This late-career delight is a masterful demonstration of the comic genius's expert timing and sidesplitting visual gags, and a bemused last look at technology run amok. 25 THU 8 p.m. Bill Forsyth. Members' Movie Night. BREAKING IN (Bill Forsyth, US 1989, 91 min.) In a change-of-pace role, Burt Reynolds is a career burglar who takes on aimless young kid (the very funny Casey Siemaszko) as an apprentice. But while the older thief tries to impart everything he knows about life and his business, youthful impatience creates a rift in the partnership. Working from an original screenplay by John Sayles, director Bill Forsyth delivers a gentle and charming comedy with two wonderful lead performances. 26 FRI 8 p.m. Rochester Exclusive. THE MAID (LA NANA, Sebastián Silva, Chile 2009, 95 min., Spanish/subtitles) Winner of the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, this nimble comedy provides a fascinating character study of Raquel (Catalina Saavedra, who also won a Sundance jury prize for her performance), a live-in domestic for a Santiago family for more than 20 years who grows weary of her job. But when the family tries to assist by hiring extra help, Raquel reacts with a passive-aggressive jealousy, subtly declaring war on her employers and a series of new maids. Co-presented by the Rochester Labor Council. 27 SAT 8 p.m. 25th Anniversary! PEE-WEE'S BIG ADVENTURE (Tim Burton, US 1985, 90 min.) In the strange and wonderful story of a manchild in search of his beloved bicycle, Paul Reubens introduced movie audiences around the world to one of the iconic figures of the 1980s, Pee-wee Herman. First-time feature director Tim Burton and co-writers Reubens and Phil Hartman craft a narrative and emotional atmosphere that secretly recall the neorealist classic The Bicycle Thief. 28 SUN 5 p.m. PEE-WEE'S BIG ADVENTURE. See March 27   7 p.m. THE MAID. See March 26. 29 MON 1:30 p.m. SENIOR MATINEE (free to those age 60 and over) ISLAND IN THE SKY(1953, William A. Wellman, 109 min.) 30 TUE 8 p.m. Silent Cinema. I KISS YOUR HAND, MADAME (ICH KÜSSE IHRE HAND, MADAME, Robert Land, Germany 1929, 66 min.) Marlene Dietrich stars as Laurence Gerard, a Parisian divorcee who sets her sights on the dashing Count Lerski. Filmed in her native Germany before Dietrich achieved international stardom in 1930's The Blue Angel, Madame afforded her newfound American fans a fascinating glimpse of a legend in the making when it was released stateside in 1932. Live piano by Philip C. Carli. 31 WED Jacques Tati. PARADE (Jacques Tati, France 1974, 85 min., French/subtitles) For the first time since his feature debut, Tati isn't playing the iconic M. Hulot; nor is he really the star. Instead, the comic master turns an almost documentary eye toward life under the big top. Clowns tumble and acrobats twirl, and in the middle of it all, ringmaster Tati performs several classic mimes. Tati's final feature returns him to his music hall roots and serves as a fitting farewell. "It's a sublime and awesome coda to the career of one this century's greatest artists."-Jonathan Rosenbaum, Chicago Reader.