iroquois-indian-museum.JPGHowes Cave, N.Y. -- The Iroquois Indian Museum opens for its 2012 season on May 1 with a new exhibit and a wealth of special events throughout the year. From May 1 until the closing day on November 30, the Museum hosts the exhibition, "Birds and Beasts in Beads: 150 Years of Iroquois Beadwork." The exhibit features more than 200 beaded objects, largely from the collection of retired archeologist and Museum trustee, Dolores Elliott. A great number of animal images appear in Iroquois beadwork including pets, forest wildlife, farm animals, and exotic beasts. The exhibition highlights these animals that appear on varied beaded household items such as purses, pincushions, wall pockets and picture frames made popular during the Victorian era. In addition to the exhibit, the Museum has a Nature Park of 45 acres and a Children's Museum -- an active, hands-on area -- where Iroquois traditions are introduced through crafts, games and technologies. The Museum has a full schedule of special events in 2012 (see below). Events at the Museum are free with paid admission. The Museum is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and from 12 Noon to 5 p.m. on Sunday. It is closed Monday. Regular admission is $8 for adults, $6.50 for seniors/students and $5 for children ages 5-12. Children under five are free when accompanied by an adult. Special group rates are available by calling the Museum at 518-296-8949. For more information, visit http://www.iroquoismuseum.org/. About the Museum The Iroquois Indian Museum is an educational institution dedicated to fostering understanding of Iroquois culture using Iroquois art as a window to that culture.  The Museum is a venue for promoting Iroquois art and artists, and a meeting place for all peoples to celebrate Iroquois culture and diversity.  As an anthropological institution, it is informed by research on archaeology, history, and the common creative spirit of modern artists and craftspeople. The Museum represents the world's most comprehensive collection of modern Iroquois art work. This collection celebrates the ancient unity of the Iroquois still expressed in the creative spirit of today's artists. A special interactive Children's area introduces young visitors to Iroquois traditions through a variety of crafts, games and technologies. A guide posted Nature Park of 45 acres is open year round for walks, snowshoeing, and cross-country skiing. 2012 SPECIAL EVENTS (All events take place during regular Museum hours, unless otherwise noted. These events are made possible with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency and the Institute of Museum and Library Services, a federal agency.  Additional contributions come from members and friends of the Iroquois Indian Museum.) May 26 & 27: IROQUOIS CULTURAL FESTIVAL: Join the Iroquois Indian Museum at New York State Historical Association in Cooperstown for their first festival featuring Iroquois artists, dancers and storytellers. May 29: NATIVE AMERICAN ARTISAN SERIES: Carla Hemlock, Mohawk quilter and Babe Hemlock, Mohawk painter demonstrate at Iroquois Indian Museum. (May 26 - 28: Carla and Babe will be at the Fenimore Art Museum/New York State Historical Association, Cooperstown) June 3: from 1:00 - 3:00: PLANTING A THREE SISTERS GARDEN AND STORYTELLING: Visitors are invited to help us plant a Three Sisters Garden of corn, beans and squash.  Traditional Iroquois stories about planting and the natural world will be shared. June 22:  NATIVE AMERICAN ARTISAN SERIES: Natasha Smoke Santiago, Mohawk painter and sculptor demonstrates at Iroquois Indian Museum (June 17 - 21: Natasha will be at the Fenimore Art Museum/New York State Historical Association, Cooperstown) July 4:  EARLY TECHNOLOGY DAY: Visitors can watch and participate in the process of flint knapping, using local and semi-local cherts and lithics, fire making, atl-atl spear throwing, and early archery.  There will be displays of projectile points, tools, and local archaeological finds from our archaeology department.  July 14:  IROQUOIS SOCIAL DANCE SATURDAY with ONOTA'A:KA (Oneida Nation Dancers) Onota'a:ka, based in the central New York Haudenosaunee community of Oneida, was founded by Elder and Wolf Clan Mother Maisie Shenandoah for the purpose of cultural education.  While Maisie passed away in 2009, the troupe's original purpose continues to be carried forth by daughter Vicky, granddaughter Tawn:tene (Cindy Schenandoah Stanford) and an extended family with common goals.  For the Schenandoahs dance is not a separate expression of heritage and thanksgiving, but one that is thoroughly integrated into daily life.   The dancers will demonstrate a variety of traditional Iroquois Social Dances and encourage participation from the audience.  Social songs vary in length, verses and tempo depending on the song selection of the singers. All dances are done in a counter clockwise direction. The instruments used in the social dances in various combinations are the water drum, the horn rattle, hard sticks and the beating of the feet on the floor. July 20: NATIVE AMERICAN ARTISAN SERIES: Penelope S. Minner, Seneca Basketmaker demonstrates at Iroquois Indian Museum (August 5 - 7:  Penelope will be at the Fenimore Art Museum/New York State Historical Association, Cooperstown) July 28:  IROQUOIS SOCIAL DANCE SATURDAY: Iroquois performers will demonstrate a variety of traditional Iroquois Social Dances and encourage participation from the audience.  Social songs vary in length, verses and tempo depending on the song selection of the singers. All dances are done in a counter clockwise direction. The instruments used in the social dances in various combinations are the water drum, the horn rattle, hard sticks and the beating of the feet on the floor. August 2, 3, & 4:  SONG QUEST WITH JOANNE SHENANDOAH:  For the first time at the Iroquois Indian Museum, Grammy Award winning songwriter and performer Joanne Shenandoah offers a comprehensive song-writing workshop. Benefit Concert Performance at the conclusion of the workshop on Saturday evening.  Pre-registration for workshop required. shenandoaj@aol.com August 8: NATIVE AMERICAN ARTISAN SERIES: Karen Ann Hoffman, Oneida beadworker demonstrates at Iroquois Indian Museum  (August 5 - 7:  Karen will be at the Fenimore Art Museum/New York State Historical Association, Cooperstown) August 11:  IROQUOIS SOCIAL DANCE SATURDAY with the HAUDENOSAUNEE DANCERS from Onondaga. The Haudenosaunee Dancers perform Iroquois social dances as practiced in their small traditional community near Syracuse.  Elegant and knowledgeable, leader Sherri Waterman-Hopper has traveled internationally as an artist and cultural speaker.  The Dancers feature a core group of seasoned singer/musicians and talented and dedicated young adults.  Pride in the culture and adherence to the traditions are the hallmarks of this disciplined troupe.  The dancers will demonstrate a variety of traditional Iroquois Social Dances and encourage participation from the audience.  Social songs vary in length, verses and tempo depending on the song selection of the singers. All dances are done in a counter clockwise direction. The instruments used in the social dances in various combinations are the water drum, the horn rattle, hard sticks and the beating of the feet on the floor. August 24:  NATIVE AMERICAN ARTISAN SERIES: Ken Maracle, Cayuga Wampum Maker demonstrates at Iroquois Indian Museum  (August 21 - 23 : Ken will be at the Fenimore Art Museum/New York State Historical Association, Cooperstown) September 1 & 2: 31ST ANNUAL IROQUOIS INDIAN FESTIVAL: Festival offerings include Iroquois music and social dance, traditional stories, all-Iroquois art market, games and Native food. More highlights include wildlife exhibits,  archeology ID table, and flintknapping demonstrations. September 2: NATIVE AMERICAN ARTISAN SERIES: Vince Bomberry, Cayuga Sculptor demonstrates at Iroquois Indian Museum  (August 30 - September 1: Vince will be at the Fenimore Art Museum/New York State Historical Association, Cooperstown)

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Contact: Stephanie Shultes, Curator Iroquois Indian Museum 518-296-8949 info@iroquoismuseum.org