Klaatu barada nikto!Rochester, N.Y. - The Thing from Another World, Batman, The Lord of the Rings, The Birds and even Howard the Duck and a robot named Gort are heading toward Rochester and the George Eastman House International Museum of Photography and Film this summer. Eastman House is also featuring the first part of a two-part film tribute to the late Philip Seymour Hoffman. 

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

CURRENT EXHIBITIONS

Lewis Hine
June 14-September 17, 2014
The major retrospective of this celebrated documentary photographer, reformer, and educator returns to Rochester from its international tour. The exhibition, drawn from the collection of George Eastman House, features more than 150 original prints dating from 1905 to 1937 as well as period publications, posters, and ephemera. http://www.eastmanhouse.org/events/detail.php?title=hine_2014  

Mickalene Thomas: Happy Birthday to a Beautiful Woman
June 20-October 19, 2014
In this multimedia installation, contemporary artist Mickalene Thomas creates a raw yet tender portrait of her mother and longtime muse, Sandra Bush. The result is a poignant exploration of the mother-daughter relationship, self-presentation, and identity. Sponsored in part by Deborah Ronnen and Sherman F. Levey. http://www.eastmanhouse.org/events/detail.php?title=mickalene-thomas_2014

A History of Photography Ongoing
A history of photography, from artistic pursuit to commercial enterprise and from amateur pastime to documentary record, is told through rotating installations of photographs and cameras from the
Eastman House collection. Sponsored in part by ESL Federal Credit Union. http://www.eastmanhouse.org/events/detail.php?title=historyofphotography

Kodak Camera 125th Anniversary
Ongoing
The Kodak, the first successful roll-film hand camera, was publicly launched in the summer of 1888. Designed with the novice photographer in mind, the Kodak became highly popular in large part due to its ease of use. The museum's new exhibition, Kodak Camera at 125, showcases this new system of photography that George Eastman introduced to the world, with examples of early Kodak cameras and facsimiles of snap- shots and documents from the Eastman House collections. http://www.eastmanhouse.org/events/detail.php?title=kodak125

UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS

The Disappearance of Darkness
September 20, 2014-January 4, 2015

Innovation in the Imaging Capital
September 20, 2014-January 4, 2015


JULY

July 2 Wednesday, 3 p.m.
SIGN-LANGUAGE GARDEN TOUR

Signed 45-minute garden tours are led by docent Bob Menchel. No reservations required. Included with museum admission. (Private signed tours are also available with advance notice; contact Heather Gray at hgray@geh.org )

July 7-9 PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP
35mm Daguerreotype

Make real daguerreotypes with your 35mm camera without expensive processing equipment or dangerous chemicals. Details and registration: bit.ly/eastmanworkshops, or contact Nick Brandreth at nbrandreth@geh.org.

July 9 Wednesday, 5:15p.m., Curtis Theater
PHOTO FINISH 5K Information Session

The George Eastman House Photo Finish 5K returns for its fourth year on Saturday,September 27, to raise funds for Rochester causes. This "Philanthropy Challenge" benefits dozens of nonprofit organizations through a single event, honoring George Eastman's legacy of community philanthropy. Participant registration opens on June 4, National Running Day, at photofinish5k.eastmanhouse.org. Attend an information session to learn more about raising money for your favorite charity. Use café entrance. RSVP: (585) 271-3361 ext. 445 or photofinish5k@geh.org.

July 10 Thursday, 12:15 p.m., Curtis Theater
FOCUS 45 LECTURE: Ralph Wiegandt on Nanotechnology and the Daguerreotype

Ralph Wiegandt, assistant director of conservation, will discuss his research innanotechnology and the daguerreotype. Free to members; incl. w/ admission, or $6/$3 students for the talk only. Bring your lunch or purchase in the Eastman
House Café-call (585) 271-3361 ext. 223 to pre-order.

July 12 Saturday, 11a.m.
SIGN-LANGUAGE MUSEUM TOUR

Signed 45-minute house tours are led by docent Bob Menchel. No reservations required. Included with museum admission. (Private signed tours are also available with advance notice; contact Heather Gray at hgray@geh.org.)

July 13 Sunday, 3 p.m., Living Room
GEORGE EASTMAN's 160th BIRTHDAY

Celebrate with piano concert performed by Cristina Dinella, followed by birthday cake in the Palm House. Free to members; incl. w/ admission.

July 16 Wednesday, 6-8p.m.
GARDEN VIBES: The Ginger Faye Bakers

A rock-n-roll band through and through, the Rochester-based Ginger Faye Bakers will perform originals and rock classics from the Beatles, David Bowie, T-Rex, and more. Admission: $10 adults, $6 members, $5 students and youth (ages 13-18). Kids 12 and under free with paid adult admission. Gates open at 5 p.m. No rain dates. No refunds. (585) 271-3361 ext. 444.

July 23 Wednesday, 3 p.m.
SIGN-LANGUAGE GARDEN TOUR

Signed 45-minute garden tours are led by docent Bob Menchel. No reservations required. Included with museum admission. (Private signed tours are also available with advance notice; contact Heather Gray at hgray@geh.org.)

July 26 Saturday, 6-9:30 p.m., Café and Dryden Theatre
DINNER AND A MOVIE

Enjoy a seated dinner in the café featuring summer favorites, before the 8 p.m. screening of The Only Real Game (Mirra Blank, 2013, 82 min.). Seatings available between 6 and 7 p.m. Tickets: $20, includes dinner, dessert, and film screening. Reservations required by July 22: (585) 271-3361 ext. 223.


July 26 Saturday, 11a.m.
SIGN-LANGUAGE MUSEUM TOUR

Signed 45-minute house tours are led by docent Bob Menchel. No reservations required. Included with museum admission. (Private signed tours are also available with advance notice; contact Heather Gray at hgray@geh.org.)
 
AUGUST

August 1 Friday, 5-8 p.m.
FIRST FRIDAY-Special Evening Hours

Enjoy curator-led tours of Lewis Hine and Mickalene Thomas: Happy Birthday to a Beautiful Woman, dessert and coffee, live music, and more. Free to members; $5. Combo ticket for First Friday festivities and the 8 p.m. screening of Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance (Park Chanwook, 2002) for just $10 ($13 value) available at the Lipson Welcome Center. Sponsored by Eastman Young Professionals.


August 4-5 PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP
Tintypes: The Basics

Make your own tintype portrait and still-life image in this two-day workshop for beginners. Details and registration: bit.ly/eastmanworkshops, or contact Nick Brandreth at nbrandreth@geh.org.

August 7-8 PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP
Tintypes: The Basics

Make your own tintype portrait and still-life image in this two-day workshop for beginners. Details and registration: bit.ly/eastmanworkshops, or contact Nick Brandreth at nbrandreth@geh.org.

August 9 Saturday, 12:15 p.m., Curtis Theater
FOCUS 45 LECTURE: Charmaine Bynoe on the Fifty Crows Portfolio

Charmaine Bynoe, object preparator and graduate of the Photographic Preservation and Collections Management program, will discuss the museum's recent acquisition of the Fifty Crows portfolio. Admission: See July 10 event.

August 13 Wednesday, 6-8p.m.
GARDEN VIBES: Samantha Fish

Winner of the 2012 Blues Music Award for Best New Debut Artist, Samantha Fish plays up a storm with her trademark guitar work and soulful vocals. Admission: $10 adults, $6 members, $5 students and youth (ages 13-18). Kids 12 and under free with paid adult admission. Gates open at 5 p.m. No rain dates. No refunds. (585) 271-3361 ext. 444.

August 13 Wednesday, 3 p.m.
SIGN-LANGUAGE GARDEN TOUR

Signed 45-minute garden tours are led by docent Bob Menchel. No reservations required. Included with museum admission. (Private signed tours are also available with advance notice; contact Heather Gray at hgray@geh.org.)

August 14 Thursday, 12:15p.m., Curtis Theater
PHOTO FINISH 5K Information Session

The George Eastman House Photo Finish 5K returns for its fourth year on Saturday, September 27, to raise funds for Rochester causes. This "Philanthropy Challenge" benefits dozens of nonprofit organizations through a single event, honoring George Eastman's legacy of community philanthropy. Participant registration opens on June 4, National Running Day, at photofinish5k.eastmanhouse.org. Attend an information session to learn more about raising money for your favorite charity. Use café entrance. RSVP: (585) 271-3361 ext. 445 or photofinish5k@geh.org.

August 16 Saturday, 11a.m.
SIGN-LANGUAGE MUSEUM TOUR

Signed 45-minute house tours are led by docent Bob Menchel. No reservations required. Included with museum admission. (Private signed tours are also available with advance notice; contact Heather Gray at hgray@geh.org.)

August 18-21 PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP
Handmade Gelatin Dry Plate Making

Learn to make a silver bromide emulsion suitable for plates to be used in the camera. Details and registration: bit.ly/eastmanworkshops, or contact Nick Brandreth at nbrandreth@geh.org.

August 22 Friday, 6-10 p.m., Café and Dryden Theatre
DINNER AND A MOVIE

Enjoy a seated dinner in the café featuring Italian specialties, before the 8 p.m. screening of Come September (Robert Mulligan, 1961, 112 min.). Seatings available between 6 and 7 p.m. Tickets: $20, includes dinner, dessert, and film screening. Reservations required by August 19: (585) 271-3361 ext. 223. 
 
August 27 Wednesday, 3 p.m.
SIGN-LANGUAGE GARDEN TOUR

Signed 45-minute garden tours are led by docent Bob Menchel. No reservations required. Included with museum admission. (Private signed tours are also available with advance notice; contact Heather Gray at hgray@geh.org.)

August 30 Saturday, 11a.m.
SIGN-LANGUAGE MUSEUM TOUR

Signed 45-minute house tours are led by docent Bob Menchel. No reservations required. Included with museum admission. (Private signed tours are also available with advance notice; contact Heather Gray at hgray@geh.org.)


# # #

DRYDEN THEATRE FILM CALENDAR
JULY/AUGUST 2014
FEATURED FILM SERIES

By Land, By Sea, and By SkyFor many of us, summer means communing with nature to explore the wonders that abound on the land, in and on the sea, and in the sky. While we hope you'll enjoy the summer outdoors, we've programmed a diverse selection of films designed to lure you into the Dryden this July and August. This series embraces all genres: drama, comedy, animation, documentary, sci-fi, horror, and fantasy. Clash of the Titans and Batman kick it off with flights of fantasy that defy gravity. Next, a polluted river produces a destructive monster in The Host, and the sea is a battleground in Peter Weir's magnificent Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World. Terror flies out of the sky in Hitchcock's The Birds; the Antarctic sea and ice-covered land are the settings for March of the Penguins; and the frozen Arctic yields a chilling alien in The Thing from Another World. Howard the Ducklands in Cleveland, and the ocean is too big for a little lost fish in Finding Nemo. The sky brings another kind of terror in The Day the Earth Stood Still, but hold on and you'll feel like you're flying with birds in Winged Migration. Finally, venture to another land altogether-Middle-earth, to be precise-as we present our archival original release 35mm prints of Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings trilogy. No passports required!

Thursday, July 31, 8 p.m.
March of the Penguins
(La marche de l'empereur, Luc Jacquet, France/US 2005, 80 min., 35mm)


Saturday, August 2, 8 p.m.
The Thing from Another World
(Christian Nyby and Howard Hawks, US 1951, 87 min., 35mm)


Thursday, August 7, 8 p.m.
Howard the Duck
(Willard Huyck, US 1986, 110 min., 35mm)


Saturday, August 9, 8 p.m.
Sunday, August 10, 2 p.m.
Finding Nemo
(Andrew Stanton, US 2003, 100 min., 35mm)
Thursday, August 14, 8 p.m.
The Day the Earth Stood Still
(Robert Wise, US 1951, 92 min., 35mm)


Thursday, August 21, 8 p.m.
Winged Migration
(Le peuple migrateur, Jacques Perrin, Jacques Cluzaud, and Michel Debats, France/Germany/Spain/ Italy/Switzerland 2001, 89 min., English and French w/ subtitles, 35mm)

Thursday, July 10, 8 p.m.
Clash of the Titans
(Desmond Davis, US 1981, 118 min., 35mm)


Friday, July 11, 8 p.m.
Batman-25th Anniversary Screening
(Tim Burton, US/UK 1989, 126 min., 35mm)

Thursday, July 17, 8 p.m.
The Host
(Gwoemul, Bong Joon-ho, South Korea 2006, 119 min., Korean and English w/ subtitles, 35mm)


Thursday, July 24, 8 p.m.
Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World
(Peter Weir, US 2003, 138 min, 35mm)

Friday, July 25, 8 p.m.
Sunday, July 27, 2 p.m.
The Birds
(Alfred Hitchcock, US 1963, 120 min., 35mm)


Thursday, August 28, 8 p.m.
The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
(Peter Jackson, New Zealand/US 2001, 178 min., 35mm)

Friday, August 29, 8 p.m.
The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers
(Peter Jackson, New Zealand/US 2002, 179 min., 35mm)


Saturday, August 30, 8 p.m.
The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
(Peter Jackson, New Zealand/US 2003, 201 min., 35mm)

_ _ _ _ _

A Tribute to Philip Seymour Hoffman, Part I
On February 2, 2014, the world tragically lost one of the most talented, ambitious, and audacious actors of any generation: Philip Seymour Hoffman. Raised in Fairport, New York, Hoffman discovered theatre at an early age while attending a production of All My Sons with his mother-a moment which he claimed changed his life. Fate stepped in during high school when a neck injury brought his wrestling career to an end, and he tried his hand at acting. His teenage performance as Willy Loman in Death of a Salesman is still remembered by those lucky enough to have seen it. Upon graduating, he moved to New York to study acting at the Tisch School of the Arts, and the rest is history. Hoffman's first major role in 1992's Scent of a Woman opposite Al Pacino, placed him squarely on the map as an up-and-coming talent. He rapidly became one of the screen's most recognizable character actors, whose performances were always a delight to watch as they so often changed the films he was in. Rochester will always be proud of its "hometown boy" who became one of the most revered actors in the world yet never forgot his roots. The Dryden is honored to be hosting a major retrospective of his work (part 2 will continue in September and October). Please join us in celebrating the life and career of Philip Seymour Hoffman as we pay tribute to both the incredible actor and man that he was.

Wednesday, July 2, 8 p.m.
Boogie Nights
(Paul Thomas Anderson, US 1997, 155 min., 35mm)


Wednesday, July 9, 8 p.m.
Happiness
(Todd Solondz, US 1998, 134 min., 35mm)


Wednesday, July 16, 8:30 p.m.
Magnolia
(Paul Thomas Anderson, US 1999, 188 min., 35mm)


Wednesday, July 23, 8 p.m.
State and Main
(David Mamet, US/France 2000, 105 min., 35mm)


Wednesday, July 30, 8 p.m.
Love Liza
(Todd Louiso, France/Germany/US 2002, 90 min., 35mm)


Wednesday, August 6, 8 p.m.
25th Hour
(Spike Lee, US 2002, 135 min., 35mm)


Wednesday, August 13, 8:30 p.m.
Along Came Polly
(John Hamburg, US 2004, 90 min., 35mm)


Wednesday, August 20, 8 p.m.
Capote
(Bennett Miller, US/Canada 2005, 114 min., 35mm)


Wednesday, August 27, 8 p.m.
Mission: Impossible III
(J. J. Abrams, US/Germany/China 2006, 126 min., 35mm)

_ _ _ _ _

Vengeance Trilogy
While director Park Chan-wook's 2000 blockbuster Joint Security Area came as a commercial shot in the arm for the South Korean film industry, nothing prepared audiences for the audacious artistic triumphs of his next three films. Together, the Vengeance Trilogy not only elevated Park into the upper echelons of international auteurs, they inspired Hollywood remakes and exerted a profound influence on such critically lauded works as Breaking Bad. In Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance, a factory worker desperately tries to save the life of his dying sister, only to become ensnared in a nightmare of murder and revenge. In Oldboy, a businessman is determined to find whoever inexplicably held him prisoner in a windowless hotel room for the past fifteen years-and make them pay. Lady Vengeance, meanwhile, knows exactly why she was sentenced to a women's prison, and emerges with a complex plan for retribution and, ultimately, redemption.

Friday, August 1, 8 p.m.
Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance
(Boksuneun naui geot, Park Chan-wook, South Korea 2002, 129 min., Korean w/ subtitles, 35mm)

Friday, August 8, 8 p.m.
Oldboy
(Oldeuboi, Park Chan-wook, South Korea 2003, 120 min., Korean w/ subtitles, 35mm)

Friday, August 15, 8 p.m.
Sympathy for Lady Vengeance
(Chinjeolhan geumjassi, Park Chanwook, South Korea 2005, 112 min., Korean, English, and Japanese w/ subtitles, 35mm)

_ _ _ _ _

Summer Love
Warm sunny days and hot, starry summer nights seem made-to-order for romance. This August at the Dryden, we've scheduled six films that look at romance from differing perspectives. Éric Rohmer's A Summer's Tale focuses on one man's indecision as he courts three women. Next up is Summer with Monika, Ingmar Bergman's incisive examination of mismatched lovers. We Won't Grow Old Together is an uncompromising look at a love affair that continues long after the thrill is gone. Come September (screening in a 35mm archival print from Universal Studios) was a monster hit in the summer of 1961 and remains a hilarious and charming confection with Rock Hudson and Gina Lollobrigida sparring in classic style. The Best of Everything, featuring Joan Crawford and Hope Lange, was the romantic date movie of 1959. Finally, we close out the series with Fred Astaire and Jane Powell as a brother-and-sister dance team, who both find love in Royal Wedding.

Tuesday, August 5, 8 p.m.
A Summer's Tale
(Conte d'été, Éric Rohmer, France 1996, 113 min., French w/ subtitles, 35mm)


Tuesday, August 12, 8 p.m.
Summer with Monika
(Sommaren med Monika, Ingmar Bergman, Sweden 1953, 96 min., Swedish w/ subtitles, 35mm)


Tuesday, August 19, 8 p.m.
We Won't Grow Old Together
(Nous ne vieillirons pas ensemble, Maurice Pialat, France/Italy 1972, 110 min., French w/ subtitles, 35mm)


Friday, August 22, 8 p.m.
Come September
(Robert Mulligan, US 1961, 112 min., 35mm)


Tuesday, August 26, 8 p.m.
The Best of Everything
(Jean Negulesco, US 1959, 121 min., DCP)


Sunday, August 31, 2 p.m.
Royal Wedding
(Stanley Donen, US 1951, 93 min., 35mm)



JULY/AUGUST FILMS

The Missing Picture
Tuesday, July 1, 8 p.m.-Rochester Premiere
(L'image manquante, Rithy Panh, Cambodia/France 2013, 92 min., French w/ subtitles, 35mm)

The winner of the Prize Un Certain Regard at Cannes, The Missing Picture asks if and how a documentary film can give visibility to traumatic events in history that were not, and could not be, photographed or filmed. Director Rithy Panh uses clay models as stand-ins for his family, neighbors, and many other Cambodians who lived under the oppressive regime of the Khmer Rouge (1975-79). Panh was thirteen when he escaped from Cambodia to France, where he started his career as a filmmaker. A must-see film that is as much an experiment in form and narrative as it is a sincere pursuit of historical truth.

Boogie Nights
Wednesday, July 2, 8 p.m.-Hoffman
(Paul Thomas Anderson, US 1997, 155 min., 35mm)

Penetrating the mood of the disco era, P. T. Anderson's breakout film follows Dirk Diggler (Mark Wahlberg) from his days as a petulant young dishwasher to an intrepid porn superstar in California's San Fernando Valley in the 1970s, to his fall to rock bottom in the 1980s. Philip Seymour Hoffman is heartbreaking as the conflicted homosexual boom operator Scotty J., secretly in love with Dirk but confused about how to express himself. Here, Hoffman is in the company of some of the greats of our time: Don Cheadle, William H. Macy, Julianne Moore, John
C. Reilly, and Burt Reynolds.

American Splendor
Thursday, July 3, 8 p.m.-Happy 4th
(Shari Springer Berman and Robert Pulcini, US 2003, 101 min., 35mm)

Harvey Pekar's biographical graphic novel series, American Splendor, was illustrated by artists such as Robert Crumb and Alison Bechdel. Released over the course of twenty-five years, these comic books followed Pekar's life growing up in Shaker Heights, Ohio, his association with Crumb and other artists, and even his battle with lymphoma. Using the comics as a starting point, documentary filmmakers Springer and Pulcini blend interviews of Pekar and his wife with fictionalized segments starring Paul Giamatti and Hope Davis as the same two characters, creating a unique piece of cinema autobiography.

Friday, July 4
No Screening


A Hard Day's Night
Saturday, July 5, 8 p.m.-New Restoration
Sunday, July 6, 2 p.m.
(Richard Lester, UK 1964, 87 min., DCP)

A blueprint for musical films and music videos to follow, Richard Lester's energetic slapstick comedy set to hits like "Can't Buy Me Love" and "I Should Have Known Better," has the Fab Four as themselves, running and stumbling through a rambunctious world where they must get to London to perform on a TV show. As they're chased by fans, stuck on a train, and searching for Ringo, the band encounters one hilarious obstacle after another. Lively, inventive, and all-around entertaining, A Hard Day's Night encapsulates the moment when Beatlemania was changing the world. We're proud to present a new digital restoration courtesy of Janus Films.

What Now? Remind Me
Tuesday, July 8, 8 p.m.-Rochester Premiere
(E Agora? Lembra-me, Joaquim Pinto, Portugal 2013, 164 min., Portuguese w/ subtitles, 35mm)

In this exuberant but challenging work, filmmaker Joaquim Pinto and his husband Nuno Leonel capture everyday moments in Pinto's life as he undergoes a clinical trial for HIV, intercutting the verité observation with free-flowing images and music. Much more than a "self-portrait," What Now? Remind Me is a cinematic journey that is at once personal and public, juxtaposing the present-progressive document of his body with intimate reflections on life and love. The expansive soundscape in the film attests to Pinto's accomplished career as a sound engineer who has worked with an impressive array of directors including Raul Ruiz, Manoel de Oliveira, and André Techiné.

Happiness
Wednesday, July 9, 8 p.m.-Hoffman
(Todd Solondz, US 1998, 134 min., 35mm)

Banned at Sundance for being "disagreeable," Todd Solondz's most successful film follows three sisters and the conflicts that mark their suburban lives. Deftly combining tragedy and comedy, Solondz's characters demand an empathy some viewers were not ready to deal with, offering a vision of pedophiles and sexual deviants that one seldom sees. Philip Seymour Hoffman plays Allen, who, unable to act on his sexual fantasies, makes obscene phone calls to his neighbor. As Roger Ebert pointed out, "there is the horrifying suggestion that these characters may not be grotesque exceptions, but may in fact be part of the mainstream of humanity."

Clash of the Titans
Thursday, July 10, 8 p.m.-Land, Sea, Sky
(Desmond Davis, US 1981, 118 min., 35 mm)

Liam Neeson may have re-released the Kraken in 2010, thereby launching a hugely successful
Titans franchise, but the 1981 original remains untouchable. Giant scorpions, the serpent-haired
Medusa, the Kraken (of course), and the rest of Ray Harryhausen's spectacular stop-motion mythological creatures are only one half of the fun. The other is an ensemble cast including some of Britain's finest actors (Laurence Olivier, Maggie Smith, Claire Bloom), playing Greek Gods who squabble, snipe, and gripe like jealous lovers over the fate of Greek hero Perseus (Harry Hamlin).

25th Anniversary
Batman
Friday, July 11, 8 p.m.-Land, Sea, Sky
(Tim Burton, US/UK 1989, 126 min., 35mm)

Though it has been overshadowed by Christopher Nolan's monumental Dark Knight trilogy, Burton's wildly entertaining reboot triggered a wave of Batmania, setting the stage for three sequels and innumerable big-screen comic-book adaptations. Slightly schizoid billionaire turned caped crusader Bruce Wayne (Michael Keaton, fresh off Burton's Beetlejuice and surprisingly well cast) battles a deranged, disfigured criminal psychopath (Jack Nicholson) as well as his own personal demons against the backdrop of Gotham City.

Ai Weiwei: The Fake Case
Saturday, July 12, 8 p.m.-Rochester Premiere
(Andreas Johnsen, Denmark/China/UK 2013, 86 min., Mandarin and English w/ subtitles, DCP)

Ai Weiwei is one of the most visible artists of our time, with diverse output ranging from the design of the Beijing National Stadium to an installation of tons of porcelain sunflower seeds. But visibility is not merely an act of self-promotion for this dissident artist, who keeps an active online presence partly to preempt charges by the authorities. Danish filmmaker Andreas Johnsen followed the artist in the months after his "arrest" in 2011, and made a verité-style observation of the artist's life inside his walled compound in Beijing.

In Bloom
Tuesday, July 15, 8 p.m.-Rochester Premiere
(Grzeli nateli dgeebi, Nana Ekvtimishvili and Simon Groß, Georgia/France/Germany 2013, 102 min., Georgian w/ subtitles, DCP)

Set in Tbilisi, Georgia, in the 1990s, In Bloom follows Eka and Natia, close friends whose paths diverge as they move through adolescence. Partly based on writer-director Nana Ekvtimishvili's memory of post-Soviet life, In Bloom focuses on the immediate surroundings of the heroines-though the broader political picture is visible in the quotidian scenes showing bread rationing, militias, and orphans. In Bloom won the Art Cinema Award at Berlin and a slew of other prizes in festivals around the world.

Magnolia
Wednesday, July 16, 8:30 p.m.-Hoffman
(Paul Thomas Anderson, US 1999, 188 min., 35mm)

P. T. Anderson's third feature concerns twenty four hours in the lives of a varied lot of Los Angelenos. Two dying fathers work to mend broken ties with their estranged children, while two whiz kids, one grown and one young, struggle with the pressures of their intellects. Their various family members, as well as a cop, a nurse, and a young boy, are all connected in unexpected ways-forecasting a climax of biblical proportions. Philip Seymour Hoffman is Phil Parma, a sensitive home nurse intent on fulfilling a dying man's wish.
Note start time.

The Host
Thursday, July 17, 8 p.m.-Land, Sea, Sky
(Gwoemul, Bong Joon-ho, South Korea 2006, 119 min., Korean and English w/ subtitles, 35mm)

Six years after a US Army mortuary dumps highly toxic chemicals into Seoul's Han River, the inevitable happens: a giant mutant sea monster comes out of the polluted waters to wreak havoc on the city. Bong's thrilling third feature is many things: a subtle political satire, a serious environmental cautionary tale, and simply a great monster movie. At its big heart, however, the film is also the story of an ordinary family that must deal with an extraordinary crisis when teenage daughter Hyun-seo (Go Ah-Sung) becomes Beauty to the Han River's Beast.

*Curator's Choice*
Eega
Friday, July 18, 8 p.m.
(Koduri Srisaila Sri Rajamouli, India 2012, 134 min., Telugu, Tamil, Hindi, Malayalam, Chinese, Urdu, Thai, and Kannada w/ subtitles, Blu-ray)

Your definition of "over-the-top" fantasy action-romance cinema is likely to change forever after seeing this hugely entertaining (and jaw-dropping) crowd-pleaser from one of the most talented directors of Telugu cinema. This is not typical Bollywood stuff: think, instead, of a David Cronenberg film with a naughty, eccentric smile. Remember The Fly? Try to imagine what Joe Dante, George A. Romero, and John Landis would do with it all together; then add, if you can, an extra dose of surrealism and suspension of disbelief. The Toronto After Dark Film Festival voted Eega Most Original Film, Best Special Effects, Best Editing, Best Villain, Best Hero, Best Comedy, Best Fights, and Best Film to Watch with a Crowd. It's a treat for the most adventurous
cinephile, for daring kids, and for all believers in reincarnation.

Cousin Jules
Saturday, July 19, 8 p.m.-New Restoration
(Le cousin Jules, Dominique Benicheti, France 1972, 91 min., French w/ subtitles, DCP)

Dominique Benicheti's masterfully composed documentary follows five years in the life of his cousin Jules Guiteaux and his wife Félicie. The daily routines of Jules, a blacksmith working and living on a farm in the French countryside, are seen as contemplative meditations through the beautiful compositions of cinematographer Pierre William-Glen (Day for Night, Coup de torchon). Shot in CinemaScope, this reverential tribute to the simple pleasures of manual labor was lauded as a masterpiece upon its release, and then vanished. The Dryden is proud to present (courtesy of Cinema Guild) the new restoration of this long-lost piece of cinema history, unseen for decades.
Sponsored by the Rochester Labor Council.

A Field in England
Tuesday, July 22, 8 p.m.-Rochester Premiere
(Ben Wheatley, UK 2013, 90 min., 35mm)

In this follow up to Kill List and Sightseers, Ben Wheatley refutes our assumption that color and the 1960s are essential for a psychedelic film. Set in seventeenth-century England, a group of deserters are captured by an alchemist and forced to look for a hidden treasure in an overgrown field. Instead of gold, they find "shrooms," and that's when things really start to happen. A Field in England demonstrates that the idyllic English countryside is the perfect setting for sinister plots.

State and Main
Wednesday, July 23, 8 p.m.-Hoffman
(David Mamet, US/France 2000, 105 min., 35mm)

A clever take on "films about filmmaking," David Mamet's absurdist comedy concerns the troubled production of a fictional film, The Old Mill. Plagued by setbacks, director Walt Price (William H. Macy) presses on after the company is kicked out of their location due to a controversy with the film's star. Things go downhill when the new town's mill turns out not to exist, the new writer develops writer's block, and the leading lady (Sarah Jessica Parker) questions her nude scenes. Philip Seymour Hoffman is Joseph Turner White, the afflicted writer called in to doctor the script and help the floundering production.

Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World
Thursday, July 24, 8 p.m.-Land, Sea, Sky
(Peter Weir, US 2003, 138 min., 35mm)

The seas are battlefields and the men of the HMS Surprise are their own small, floating portion of the mighty fortress that was England in 1805. Weir's magnificent and visually stunning epic examines with authenticity, pathos, and humor the challenges of seafaring in the age of wind-powered navies. Russell Crowe inhabits the role of Captain "Lucky" Jack Aubrey, whose capacity for leadership is equaled by his superlative seamanship. A stellar supporting cast and a matchless score make this film unforgettable.

The Birds
Friday, July 25, 8 p.m.-Land, Sea, Sky
Sunday, July 27, 2 p.m.
(Alfred Hitchcock, US 1963, 120 min., 35mm)

Loosely based on Daphne du Maurier's novella, the story follows Melanie Daniels (Tippi Hedren) as she travels to Bodega Bay, California, to deliver a pair of lovebirds to Mitch Brenner (Rod Taylor). While there, birds start becoming violent, swarming, and attacking the citizens indiscriminately. Melanie finds herself at the center of a battle for survival, leading to a graphic climax that took twelve days to shoot.

The Only Real Game
Saturday, July 26, 8 p.m.-Rochester Premiere
(Mirra Bank, US/India 2013, 82 min., DCP)

In the good tradition of baseball films, The Only Real Game highlights the positive impact the game has on a community-in this case, the state of Manipur in northeastern India. While the passion for cricket in India is well known, it is baseball that took root in Manipur after American GIs introduced the game there during World War II. Mirra Bank offers an intimate portrait of the people of Manipur and the former Major League players who offer support, boldly defying the social malaise arising from drug abuse, military unrest, and poverty.

Manakamana
Tuesday, July 29, 8 p.m.-Rochester Premiere
(Stephanie Spray and Pacho Velez, Nepal/US 2013, 118 min., Nepali and English w/ subtitles, 35mm)

Tourists, musicians, young men, and elder wives take the cable car up to the sacred Hindu temple Manakamana. Working in the traditions of experimental ethnography, Manakamana consists of eleven extreme long takes of the pilgrims' conversations and performances, captured by a 16mm film camera installed in a glass box inside the cable car. This is one of many innovative works that have recently emerged from Harvard's Sensory Ethnography Lab.

Love Liza
Wednesday, July 30, 8 p.m.-Hoffman
(Todd Louiso, France/Germany/US 2002, 90 min., 35mm)

Wilson Joel (Hoffman) is a man paralyzed by his wife's suicide. With the discovery of an unopened suicide note, Wilson slips into a deep depression, repressing his emotions and expanding his addiction to huffing gasoline. When a coworker notices the smell in his apartment, he explains it away as a consequence of his new hobby: model planes-sending him down a road of lies and awkwardness. The darkest of dark comedies written by Gordy Hoffman, Love Liza digs at existential questions that take on an absurdity all their own.

March of the Penguins
Thursday, July 31, 8 p.m.-Land, Sea, Sky
(La marche de l'empereur, Luc Jacquet, France/US 2005, 80 min., 35mm)

This landmark nature blockbuster follows nine months in the life of Emperor penguins in
Antarctica. Trekking dozens of miles from the sea to their mating ground, the penguins must avoid starvation as they alternate trips back to the water for food. The laying of eggs and birthing of chicks complicates matters as one of the parents needs to be a caregiver while avoiding predators and protecting against the brutal weather. Breathtaking cinematography is supported by a beautiful score and contemplative narration by Morgan Freeman.

Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance
Friday, August 1, 8 p.m.-Vengeance Trilogy
(Boksuneun naui geot, Park Chan-wook, South Korea 2002, 129 min., Korean w/ subtitles, 35mm)

When his schemes to procure a kidney for his dying sister go horribly wrong, a kindly deaf-mute factory worker (Shin Ha-kyun) plots his revenge, unaware that he's the target of a grieving father's (Song Kang-ho) vengeance. Through a bold use of color, startling widescreen composition, and fast-paced plotting, Park lays out the unsettling vision he'll explore throughout his Vengeance Trilogy: hapless humans, adrift in a cruelly indifferent-if not malevolent-universe, battle with monsters, only to become monsters themselves.

The Thing from Another World
Saturday, August 2, 8 p.m.-Land, Sea, Sky
(Christian Nyby and Howard Hawks, US 1951, 87 min., 35mm)

An unidentified object crashes in the Antarctic, and a team of scientists and US Air Force personnel are dispatched to investigate. What they find in the ice is bigger than they anticipated: a flying saucer and a body. Incredibly strong, dangerous, and seemingly unstoppable, the thing comes alive and wreaks havoc in their compound, while the crew tries desperately to keep their wits in the subzero, secluded locale.

Toronto Film Society Double Feature
Sailor's Luck and The Bowery
Sunday, August 3, 7 p.m.
(Raoul Walsh, US 1933, 79 min., 16mm)
(Raoul Walsh, US 1933, 92 min., 35mm)

Raoul Walsh puts the sizzle in these two Pre-Code features. In Sailor's Luck, Jimmy Harrigan a navy officer on leave, falls into the arms of the beautiful Sally Brent, only to discover that he must enter a dance marathon to win her heart. Wallace Beery and George Raft star in The Bowery, a comedy concerning men stuck in New York City who are compelled to place a wager on just about every act of heroism they perform. Fay Wray is Lucy Calhoun, Beery's love interest who refuses to be pigeonholed into any one commitment.
Note start time.

A Summer's Tale
Tuesday, August 5, 8 p.m.-Summer Love
(Conte d'été, Éric Rohmer, France 1996, 113 min., French w/ subtitles, 35mm)

The third installment in Rohmer's Four Seasons cycle, A Summer's Tale revolves around the shy, guitar-playing Gaspard (Melvil Poupaud), who vacillates between three women with contrasting personalities: a friendly waitress Margot (Amanda Langlet), the flirtatious local Solène (Gwenaëlle Simon), and his girlfriend Lena (Aurelia Nolin). The sun-drenched Breton beach offers a perfect setting for extended philosophical discussions, a signature trait that distinguishes Rohmer from his French New Wave cohorts and continues to enchant and baffle the critics.

25th Hour
Wednesday, August 6, 8 p.m.-Hoffman
(Spike Lee, US 2002, 135 min., 35mm)

Twenty-four hours before serving his seven year prison sentence for drug dealing, Monty Brogan (Edward Norton) and his girlfriend Naturelle (Rosario Dawson) meet two of his friends: Frank (Barry Pepper), a Wall Street big shot, and Jacob (Philip Seymour Hoffman), a high school teacher with a desperate crush on a student. Stalking the streets until dawn and revisiting old haunts, Brogan questions his life, fueling his pent-up anger toward just about everything and everybody. Hoffman's performance is filled with a complexity few actors are capable of accomplishing.

Howard the Duck
Thursday, August 7, 8 p.m.-Land, Sea, Sky
(Willard Huyck, US 1986, 110 min., 35mm)

Panned on its release, George Lucas's adaptation of the cigar-chomping antihero is now a cult favorite. Made live-action because of a contractual obligation, an actor was given a costume to create the three-foot duck. Howard is ripped from Duckworld and abandoned on Earth, where he befriends Beverly (Lea Thompson), a rocker with a penchant for getting into trouble. After exposing Beverly's manager as a thief, Howard takes over while scientists find ways to get him home.

Oldboy
Friday, August 8, 8 p.m.-Vengeance Trilogy
(Oldeuboi, Park Chan-wook, South Korea 2003, 120 min., Korean w/ subtitles, 35mm)

The centerpiece of the Vengeance Trilogy is stylishly brutal, blackly funny, and entirely in a class of its own. Fifteen years after he is inexplicably snatched off the streets of Seoul and held prisoner in a windowless hotel room, a Korean businessman (Choi Min-sik) is suddenly freed, still with no idea why he was imprisoned. Determined to learn the identity of his tormentors, he slices, dices, and hammers his way across the city, and discovers revenge really is a dish best served cold-with a side of live octopus.

Finding Nemo
Saturday, August 9, 8 p.m.-Land, Sea, Sky
Sunday, August 10, 2 p.m.
(Andrew Stanton, US 2003, 100 min., 35mm)

Pixar's most successful film is the story of an improbable reunion. Young clown fish Nemo feels stifled by his overprotective father, Marlin, but when Nemo is captured by a scuba diver, it's up to Marlin to rescue him. Voice work by Albert Brooks, Willem Dafoe, Ellen DeGeneres, John
Ratzenberger, and Geoffrey Rush wonderfully punctuates this endearing fish story.

Summer with Monika
Tuesday, August 12, 8 p.m.-Summer Love
(Sommaren med Monika, Ingmar Bergman, Sweden 1953, 96 min., Swedish w/ subtitles, 35mm)

Bergman's first feature released in the US contributed to the image of European Cinema as Hollywood's more challenging and artistic counterpart. Harriet Andersson is an adolescent temptress who takes off on a whimsical escapade with an errand boy (Lars Ekborg), and walks out in boredom, leaving him to care for their child. This escape from the drudgery of working-class Stockholm to the Swedish countryside pays homage to Italian Neorealism and anticipates the French New Wave.

Along Came Polly
Wednesday, August 13, 8:30 p.m.-Hoffman
(John Hamburg, US 2004, 90 min., 35mm)

Insurance risk specialist Reuben Feffer (Ben Stiller) is on his honeymoon when he catches his wife in bed with a scuba instructor. When he returns to New York, his highly organized life begins falling apart, especially when he is reunited with high school classmate Polly (Jennifer Aniston). Introducing him to "risky" but worthwhile life experiences, Polly brings Reuben out of his comfort zone. Philip Seymour Hoffman is at his comedic best here as Reuben's friend Sandy Lyle, a former child star floundering in community theatre, whose talents come in handy at the perfect moment. Note start time.

The Day the Earth Stood Still
Thursday, August 14, 8 p.m.-Land, Sea, Sky
(Robert Wise, US 1951, 92 min., 35mm)

A sci-fi classic, this film retains a potency and elegance not found in others of its kind. The skies worldwide are suddenly alive and buzzing with a strange object, traveling faster than any known aircraft. Anxiety and mistrust fueled by the Cold War converge to set the stage for a memorable showdown. Michael Rennie heads a brilliant cast that includes Patricia Neal, Sam Jaffe, Hugh Marlowe, and Billy Gray. Wise's taut direction, the moody black-and-white photography, and Bernard Herrmann's score combine to remind us that we are not alone. Gort, Klaatu barada nikto!

Sympathy for Lady Vengeance
Friday, August 15, 8 p.m.-Vengeance Trilogy
(Chinjeolhan geumjassi, Park Chan-wook, South Korea 2005, 112 min., Korean, English, and Japanese w/ subtitles, 35mm)

Having served time for the kidnapping and murder of a young boy, Lee Geum-ja (Lee Yeong-ae) is released from prison with a new look, a new attitude, and a deadly plan. What Geum-ja's doing, why she's doing it, and whom she intends to do it to remain a mystery for much of the film; the story gradually, ingeniously comes together through the stories of Geum-ja's former fellow inmates. While not as graphic as Mr. Vengeance or Oldboy, this underrated final installment in Park's Vengeance Trilogy is perhaps the most thoughtful and emotionally satisfying.

The Final Member
Saturday, August 16, 8 p.m.-Rochester Premiere
Sunday, August 17, 2 p.m.
(Jonah Bekhor and Zach Math, Canada 2012, 75 min., English and Icelandic w/ subtitles, DCP)

Meet Sigurður "Siggi" Hjartarson, curator of the Icelandic Phallological Museum-the world's only penis museum-where specimens from creatures big and small (sperm whale to field mouse) adorn the walls. The collection lacks the "final member," a human specimen-that is, until an eccentric American and an elderly Icelander eagerly volunteer. Bekhor and Math score big in their debut feature that tells a surprisingly compelling human drama of clashing egos and raw passion.

We Won't Grow Old Together
Tuesday, August 19, 8 p.m.-Summer Love
(Nous ne vieillirons pas ensemble, Maurice Pialat, France/Italy 1972, 110 min., French w/ subtitles, 35mm)

Forty-something filmmaker Jean (Jean Yanne in his Cannes best actor performance) and young working-class girl Catherine (Marlène Jobert) have a long-standing affair that is sustained as if by mutual antagonism. An effective use of ellipses accentuates the abrupt mood swings that propel the film toward an overwrought climax. We Won't Grow Old Together was an instant hit in France, but was never commercially released in the US.
A new 35mm print!

Capote
Wednesday, August 20, 8 p.m.-Hoffman
(Bennett Miller, US/Canada 2005, 114 min., 35mm)

It's 1959, and author and socialite Truman Capote travels to Kansas to research the murder of a family and the story of the murderer's capture. It isn't long, however, before Capote becomes close with one of the accused, Perry Smith. Capote follows their conversations, relationship, and the internal struggles Capote faced in writing In Cold Blood. Philip Seymour Hoffman's Academy
Award-winning performance as Capote showed just how far-reaching his talent actually was.

Winged Migration
Thursday, August 21, 8 p.m.-Land, Sea, Sky
(Le peuple migrateur, Jacques Perrin, Jacques Cluzaud, and Michel Debats, France/Germany/Spain/Italy/Switzerland 2001, 89 min., English and Frenchw/ subtitles, 35mm)

Less a documentary than an ode to our avian brethren, this film compiles four years' worth of footage into a stunning look at the routes and habits of migratory birds. Cameras were mounted on various modes of transportation, including ultralights, paragliders, hot air balloons, motorboats, and remote-controlled robots, to immerse the viewer in the birds' world. Dozens of species are seen, across all seven continents and in all types of terrain and weather, but the unifying factor is the breathtaking cinematography that brings a never-before-seen piece of our world to the screen.

Come September
Friday, August 22, 8 p.m.-Summer Love
(Robert Mulligan, US 1961, 112 min., 35mm)

Italy is the backdrop for this frothy romantic comedy about three couples falling in and out of love. Rock Hudson and Gina Lollobrigida are once-a-year lovers, compromised this year by Walter Slezak's wily majordomo, a chirpy chaperone overseeing a gaggle of college girls, and a trio of brash college boys with raging hormones. Sandra Dee and Bobby Darin met and fell in love making this film, and Darin composed the title song and "Multiplication." 35mm archival print courtesy of Universal Studios.

Mood Indigo
Saturday, August 23, 8 p.m.-Rochester Premiere
Sunday, August 24, 2 p.m.
(L'écume des jours, Michel Gondry, France/Belgium 2013, 131 min., English and French w/ subtitles, DCP)

A Gondry fairy tale at its best, Mood Indigo reminds us of the power of poetic imagination and lush visuals to transport us to a universe where a concrete block is as soft as sand and music carries a material presence. A wealthy bachelor with a penchant for quirky inventions falls in love with Chloé (Audrey Tautou). The couple revels in the surreal city of Paris, until Chloé falls sick with a water lily growing in her lung.

The Best of Everything
Tuesday, August 26, 8 p.m.-Summer Love
(Jean Negulesco, US 1959, 121 min., DCP)

The date movie of 1959 is the story of young women striving for success in the competitive worlds of publishing and theatre. Laced with unwanted pregnancy, unrequited love, backstabbing, and alcoholism, the film showcased up-and-coming actresses Hope Lange, Diane Baker, and the greatest fashion model of the fifties, Suzy Parker. But it is the semiretired Joan Crawford who dazzles as the successful business woman who achieved everything but lasting love.

Mission: Impossible III
Wednesday, August 27, 8 p.m.-Hoffman
(J. J. Abrams, US/Germany/China 2006, 126 min., 35mm)

J. J. Abrams's (Star Trek, Super 8) directorial debut showcases his creativity in an established genre. Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise) has retired to live a life of seclusion with his wife, training new recruits for the Impossible Missions Force. When his ex-partner Lindsey Ferris is kidnapped, he is pulled back in to deal with a highly dangerous criminal mastermind and arms dealer Owen Davian (Philip Seymour Hoffman). Hoffman's unpredictable yet astounding performance as pure evil is unnerving with every word he says.

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring
Thursday, August 28, 8 p.m.-Land, Sea, Sky
(Peter Jackson, New Zealand/US 2001, 178 min., 35mm)

Even to those who lack the "gene" for fantasy, Peter Jackson's Lord of the Rings trilogy is a towering achievement. A spectacle on the order of Hollywood's grandest productions, Jackson's Rings are simultaneously dense and somber, evoking the "everyday" elements of J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth. In this first film, the hobbit Frodo Baggins (Elijah Wood) inherits the ancient ring of power belonging to the dark lord Sauron, who is bent on conquering Middleearth. With Gandalf the Grey (Ian McKellen), and seven stalwart friends, the Fellowship is forged, and Frodo begins his journey to destroy the One Ring before Sauron can reclaim it.

The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers
Friday, August 29, 8 p.m.-Land, Sea, Sky
(Peter Jackson, New Zealand/US 2002, 179 min., 35mm)

So rapturous and epic are many of this film's sequences that Cecil B. DeMille would have been green with envy. In the second part of his adaptation of Tolkien's tomes, Jackson charges his hobbits toward Mordor to destroy the One Ring, led by the deranged and ring-addicted Gollum. Vividly brought to life by Andy Serkis, Gollum shuttles like a mad thing between benevolent desperation and seething, dreadful rage. Meanwhile, the other members of the party are at war with the Uruk-hai, led by Saruman the White (Christopher Lee), who has defied the Fellowship by siding with Sauron.

The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
Saturday, August 30, 8 p.m.-Land, Sea, Sky
(Peter Jackson, New Zealand/US 2003, 201 min., 35mm)

This trilogy took seven years and a veritable army of film artists to complete, but Jackson oversaw this massive production with the deftness of a Laurence Olivier or a David Lean. By the end of The Return of the King, one has the astonishing feeling of having been on a journey through a singular world. In this climactic final installment, hobbits Frodo and Samwise Gamgee (Sean Astin) continue to Mordor to destroy the One Ring. To distract Sauron's burning eye, Aragorn (Viggo Mortensen) and Gandalf mobilize the World of Men to battle against Sauron's army at the gates of Mordor.

Royal Wedding
Sunday, August 31, 2 p.m.-Summer Love
(Stanley Donen, US 1951, 93 min., 35mm)

End the summer with double the romance as brother-and-sister dance team (Fred Astaire and Jane Powell) find love in Great Britain. Each averse to a committed relationship in their own way, Jane falls for a lord she meets on the boat (Peter Lawford), while Fred pursues a dancer who already has her own commitments. Choreography by Nick Castle includes famous sequences of Astaire in a graceful duet with a coatrack and dancing on the ceiling.

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George Eastman House combines the world's leading museum of photography and film with the house, gardens, and estate George Eastman, the father of popular photography and motion picture film.
Address: 900 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14607-2298
Web site: www.eastmanhouse.org  
Phone: (585) 271-3361
Hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday (closed Mondays)
Tours
House Tours: Tues.-Sat., 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m.; Sun., 2 p.m.
Gallery Tours: Thurs.-Sat. 1 p.m.
Garden Tours: May-Sept., Tues.-Fri., noon; Sat., noon and 3:30 p.m.; Sun., 3:30 p.m. and June-Aug., Tues.-Sat., noon and 3:30 p.m.; Sun., 3:30 p.m.
Self-Guided Cell Phone Tours: (585) 563-3496.
Self-Tour Scripts: Available at the Lipson Welcome Center.

Accessibility & Interpretation
George Eastman House is accessible. Some areas of the historic house and gardens have limited wheel- chair accessibility. Sign Language Interpretation: Provided with one week's notice. Call (585) 271-3361 ext. 238. Sign language tours available. Closed-Captioning: Displayed on media presentations throughout the historic house. Hearing Amplification Devices: A hearing-induction loop system funded by the Hearing Loss Association of America, Rochester Chapter, is installed in the Dryden, and loop receivers are available in the box office. An Infrared System is also available.

**NEW** Museum Admission: $14 for adults; $12 for senior citizens (62 and older); $6 for students; and free for children 12 and under and museum members (museum and garden tours are included with admission)
Dryden Admission: $8 for the general public, $6 for students and museum members.
Eastman House Café: Open for lunch and dinner Tues.-Sun. during regular museum hours and before film screenings.

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Media Contact:
Kellie Fraver
Public Relations Manager
kfraver@geh.org
(585) 271-3361 ext. 213