eastman-house.jpgFebruary brings a busy calendar to the George Eastman House International Museum of Photography and Film in Rochester. From special Abraham Lincoln commemorations and programs to a Valentine's Day Brunch and Film, to an Academy Awards® Party, you won't want to miss an eventful month at the Eastman! 

1 Sunday OPENING OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN DISPLAY "Lincoln Portrait: Conservation of a National Treasure" features a recent Eastman House restoration of a partially shattered glass-plate interpositive of Abraham Lincoln, featuring Lincoln's favorite portrait of himself. This image "is the closest you will ever get to seeing Lincoln, short of putting your eyeballs on the man himself," explained Grant Romer, director of the museum's Advanced Residency Program (ARP) in Photograph Conservation, who is one of the world's leading experts on 19th-century and Lincoln photography. The image was taken in 1860 when Lincoln was beginning his presidential run. The interpositive was made directly from the collodion negative in the camera, which was ultimately in the room with Lincoln, capturing the light that bounced off his face. This is the only known interpositive of this portrait, with the original negative reportedly shattered. Also on view at Eastman House will be a treasured 8x10" albumen print of Lincoln, featuring another pose preferred by Lincoln. Included with museum admission. 5 Thursday, 6 p.m. PHOTOGRAPHY LECTURE "Facing Lincoln," presented by Grant Romer, director of George Eastman House's Advanced Residency Program in Photograph Conservation, will discuss how the face of Abraham Lincoln has been an essential element of historical fascination, and the role that photography has had in establishing Lincoln's iconic presence in American culture. "We know Lincoln not because of a painting of Lincoln, not because of a statue of Lincoln, but because of photographs of Lincoln," said Romer, who is one of the world's leading experts on 19th-century and Lincoln photography. The lecture will be held in the Dryden Theatre and is included with museum admission. 6 Friday EXHIBITION OPENING Spring comes early to George Eastman House with the popular annual exhibition The Dutch Connection, featuring thousands of flowing bulbs — tulips, hyacinths, daffodils, amaryllis, and freesias. The historic house is decorated for winter the way George Eastman used to do, filling the Conservatory at George Eastman House with fragrant forced bulbs, from the same company in Holland where he placed his orders. This year's exhibition will mirror George Eastman's 1909 order and its color scheme, and also will feature Mr. Eastman's personal and Kodak artifacts from 1909. 7 Saturday EXHIBITION OPENING TruthBeauty: Pictorialism and the Photograph as Art, 1845-1945 opens today and is on view through May 31. The exhibition features than 100 hauntingly beautiful photographs created within the Pictorialist movement, featuring masterworks from photographers such as Alvin Langdon Coburn, Edward Steichen, and Alfred Stieglitz. TruthBeauty illustrates the rise of Pictorialism in the late 19th century from a desire to elevate photography to an art form equal to painting, drawing, and watercolor. The Pictorialism movement resulted in some of the most spectacular photographs in the history of the medium. Originally organized in collaboration with the Vancouver Art Gallery, TruthBeauty now features work drawn solely from the Eastman House collection and is currently on a sold-out national tour. 7 | 8 p.m. Saturday FILM EVENT Animator-Filmmaker Emily Hubley, daughter of pioneer anima¬tors John and Faith Hubley, introduces the Rochester Premiere of her live action-anima¬tion feature The Toe Tactic (US 2008, 84 min., Digital Projection). The film follows an unfocused woman on an emotional and quirkily funny journey with a variety of NYC residents and a chorus of cartoon advisors, and recalls the individualistic spirit of the elder Hubleys' work. Followed by post-screening discussion. Dryden Theatre. Co-presented by George Eastman House and the Rochester High Falls International Film Festival. 8 Sunday EXHIBITION CLOSING Today is the last day to view Passing Time: Video by Andrew Cross. A train spotter since childhood, British artist Andrew Cross creates films that slow our everyday view of high-speed train travel to a game of suspense and anticipation. 8 | 2 p.m. Sunday FILM EVENT Animator-Filmmaker Emily Hubley presents "A Hubley Family Animation Celebration," featuring numerous award-winning short films from Faith, John, and Emily that span six decades. Visit dryden.eastmanhouse.org for titles. Program running time approx. 90 min. Followed by post-screening discussion. Dryden Theatre. Regular admission prices apply. Co-presented by George Eastman House and the Rochester High Falls International Film Festival. 8 | 3 to 4 p.m. Sunday MUSICALE Join us on select Sundays when music fills George Eastman's home. On this Sunday, enjoy classical chamber music with strings and oboe in the Living Room. Included with admission. 12 | 6:30 p.m. Thursday DUTCH CONNECTION LECTURE This illustrated lecture by Landscape Curator Amy Kinsey pro¬vides background on The Dutch Connection exhibition, which requires months of effort to coax 6,000 bulbs to bloom for the two-week exhibition, on view Feb. 6-21. Followed by curator-led tour of the exhibition. Included with admission. Curtis Theatre. 15 | 11 a.m. Sunday VALENTINE'S DAY BRUNCH & FILM A catered brunch in the Potter Peristyle (doors open 10:30 a.m.) and at noon snuggle in the Dryden Theatre for the zany comedy Monkey Business (Howard Hawks, 1952, 97 min.), where romance goes bananas for stars Cary Grant, Ginger Rogers, Charles Coburn, and Marilyn Monroe. Admission for the brunch and film is $27.50. Regular admission apply prices for film only. For information and tickets, call (585) 271-3361 ext. 290 (reservation requested by Feb. 12). Sponsored by the Eastman House Council. 15 | 1:15 p.m. Sunday DUTCH CONNECTION LECTURE This illustrated lecture by Landscape Curator Amy Kinsey provides background on The Dutch Connection exhibition, which requires months of effort to coax 6,000 bulbs to bloom for the two-week exhibition, on view Feb. 6-21. Followed by curator-led tour of the exhibition. Included with admission. Curtis Theatre. 15 | 3 to 4 p.m. Sunday MUSICALE Join us on select Sundays when music fills George Eastman's home. On this Sunday, Eastman School of Music violinist Anyango Yarbo-Davenport and pianist EunMi Ko perform in the Living Room. Included with admission. 15 | 7 p.m. Sunday FILM EVENT The Dryden Theatre will screen a new 35mm print of the 1933 film Dancing Lady, preserved by Eastman House. Dancing Lady (Robert Z. Leonard, US, 94 min.) Joan Crawford stars in this MGM hit as a burlesque dancer who works her way up to chorus girl, then leading lady in director Clark Gable's Broadway show. The musical highlight is Crawford's dancing duet with Fred Astaire in his first movie. Comic relief is provided by Robert Benchley and The Three Stooges. The feature film will be preceded by The Paramount News Review of 1933 (1933, 10 min.) and How to Sleep (1935, 10 min.). This screening will commence a regular series of film preservations supervised and presented by Eastman House motion picture staff. Regular admission prices. 16-20 Monday through Friday PHOTO FUN WORKSHOPS FOR KIDS Young photographers can spend February recess discovering their talent behind the lens during our weeklong photography-based workshops. Cameras are provided. Fees: $120 non-members/$110 members. Registration is required. For information, call (585) 271-3361 ext. 232, or visit www.eastmanhouse.org. 19 | 6:30 p.m. Thursday GALLERY TOUR TruthBeauty curator and author Alison Nordström shares her insider perspective on selecting more than 100 works for the exhibition, and provides background on Pictorialist photography and artists. Booksigning to follow. Included with museum admission. 21 Saturday EXHIBITION CLOSING Today is the last day for the popular annual exhibition The Dutch Connection, featuring thousands of flowing bulbs — tulips, hyacinths, daffodils, amaryllis, and freesias. The historic house is decorated for winter the way George Eastman used to do, filling the Conservatory at George Eastman House with fragrant forced bulbs, from the same company in Holland where he placed his orders. This year's exhibition mirrors George Eastman's 1909 order and its color scheme, and also features Mr. Eastman's personal and Kodak artifacts from 1909. 22 | 7 p.m. Sunday ACADEMY AWARDS® PARTY 2009 Party like Hollywood stars at George Eastman House's premier red-carpet bash — at the home of the father of motion picture film. Experience the Oscars® ceremony on the big screen in the 500-seat Dryden Theatre. Dance to live music, enjoy refreshments and live entertainment, and bid on exciting silent-auction items. Advance tickets $50 ($45 for museum members), or $60 day of event. Tickets are available at eastmanhouse.org or (585) 271-3361 ext. 444. Star sponsors are Frontier and COMIDA. 26 Thursday, 6 p.m. PHOTOGRAPHY LECTURE "Abraham Lincoln: From Shards of Glass to National Treasure, the Conservation of the Hesler-Ayres Portrait Interpositive," presented by Ralph Wiegandt, assistant director for Conservation Education in George Eastman House's Advanced Residency Program. Learn about Eastman House's restoration of a rare Lincoln image, including the challenges in reconstructing a shattered glass interpositive bearing Lincoln's favorite portrait, and the conservation procedures innovated in the museum's conservation laboratory. The lecture presents the glass plate's condition as it came into the laboratory, and takes the audience through the process that was carried out so the image can be viewed and appreciated today, and preserved for the future. The lecture will be held in the Dryden Theatre and is included with museum admission.

CONTINUING EXHIBITIONS February 2009 Passing Time: Recent Video by Andrew Cross -- October 11, 2008 through Feb. 8, 2009 (Project Space)Lincoln Portrait: Conservation of a National Treasure -- Opens Feb. 1 (ongoing) (Potter Peristyle)The Dutch Connection: George Eastman's Conservatory in Winter Bloom -- Feb. 6 through 21, 2009 (Conservatory)TruthBeauty: Pictorialism and the Photograph as Art, 1845-1945 -- Feb. 7 through May 31, 2009 (Brackett Clark & South Galleries) Photographs by Andy Lock -- January 24 thru April 26, 2009 (Entrance Gallery) What We're Collecting Now 2008 -- Ongoing (New Acquisitions Gallery) The Photograph Collection: An Introduction -- Ongoing Where Do Cameras Come From? -- Ongoing (Second floor of house) Machines of Memory: Cameras from the Technology Collection -- Ongoing (Mees Gallery) The Remarkable George Eastman -- Ongoing (Second floor of house)


CALENDAR OF FILM EVENTS February 2009 Please note: Sunday films are screened at 7 p.m. unless otherwise noted Films listed begin at 8 p.m. in the Dryden Theatre, except for Sunday evening films, which begin at 7 p.m., and those otherwise noted. Effective September 2, 2008, Dryden Theatre general admission tickets are $7 and George Eastman House members and student ticket rates are $5, unless otherwise noted. "Take-10" discount tickets (10 admissions for $55/$40 members and students) are available at the box office and the Museum Shop. The film program is partially funded by the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York State Council on the Arts.MORE ESSENTIAL FILM NOIR "A black pool opened up at my feet. I dived in. It had no bottom."These words, written by Raymond Chandler and spoken by Dick Powell as Chandler's immortal fictional private detective Philip Marlowe, are from Chandler's novel Farewell, My Lovely, later adapted into the 1944 film noir masterpiece Murder, My Sweet, directed by Edward Dmytryk. The quote also perfectly encapsulates the basic nature of noir: an un-relentingly dark and mysterious world, populated by heroes who, often fatally, embrace the darkness by entering a life of crime or taking up with the wrong kind of woman. Because the cast-against-type Powell and his co-stars Claire Trevor and Mike Mazurki are so good, and the shadowy black-and-white imagery is so strong, Murder, My Sweet has become an iconic emblem of film noir and has been selected to open our second season of the genre's essentials on January 8.Murder, My Sweet's potency is largely responsible for the common misconception that many noirs are private detective stories, when actually very few are. Frequently, noir protagonists are jobless drifters who sometimes keep their dark motivations hidden, like the character played by Robert Montgomery in Ride the Pink Horse (screening on January 15). Other times they're transients who don't know what they're looking for and decide to look for trouble like Dennis O'Keefe's ex-con in Raw Deal (screening on a double bill with T-Men on January 22); or Orson Welles's Irish wanderer in the series closer The Lady from Shanghai (February 26). Just as often, noir heroes are sturdy career types whose once steady lives fall apart such as the family man played by Powell in Pitfall (screening on a double bill with Nightfall on February 12) and Fred MacMurray's insurance agent in Double Indemnity (February 19); or they're not-so-stable men with jobs, like the borderline psychopathic screenwriter embodied by Humphrey Bogart in In a Lonely Place (February 5).Typically, the noir hero's downfall comes at the hands of a femme fatale, and what a batch of dangerous dames in these classics: Claire Trevor, Anne Shirley, Wanda Hendrix, Gloria Grahame, Anne Bancroft, Lizabeth Scott, Barbara Stanwyck, Rita Hayworth. The great Ida Lupino gets her own double feature on January 29: first as the leading lady caught between Cornel Wilde and sicko Richard Widmark in Road House; then the pioneering Lupino steps behind the camera as direc¬tor in the suspenseful indie gem The Hitch-Hiker. Join Philip Marlowe and the rest of his shady comrades as we plunge into the murky waters of essential film noir every Thursday in January and February in the Dryden Theatre. ANIMATOR-FILMMAKER EMILY HUBLEY IN PERSON! Pioneering animators John Hubley (1914-1977) and wife Faith Hubley (1924-2001) were known for their experimental styles and a tendency to evoke genuine human emotions. The Hubleys frequently cast their own children as voice actors for their films. One of their daughters, Emily Hubley, became a celebrated animator and filmmaker herself. On February 7, Emily Hubley will appear in person to present the Rochester Premiere of her feature film The Toe Tactic, which combines live action and animation. The story of an unfocused woman on an emotional and quirkily funny journey who finds her life intersecting with a variety of NYC residents and a chorus of cartoon advisors, The Toe Tactic recalls the individualistic spirit of the elder Hubleys' work. On February 8, Emily Hubley will present a "Hubley Family Animation Celebration" featuring numerous award-winning short films from Faith, John, and Emily that span six decades. These two screening events are co-presented by George Eastman House and the Rochester High Falls International Film Festival. BLACK MOSES: REMEMBERING ISAAC HAYES Oscar® and Grammy®-winning composer and recording artist Isaac Hayes (1945-2008) was one of the most vibrant and vital American performers of the last several decades, whether singing on stage or acting in feature films. In memory of Hayes and in honor of Black History Month, the Dryden will present four consecutive Tuesdays in February paying homage to Isaac Hayes. February 3 features an ultra-rare concert documentary from 1973, The Black Moses of Soul. On February 10 is Gordon Parks' blaxploitation classic Shaft, starring Richard Roundtree and featuring Hayes'Academy Award®-winning title song and score. Then, Hayes writes the music and holds his own as a leading man in the fast and funny Truck Turner (February 17). Hayes lends his deep voice to Chef, a character that earned him a whole new generation of fans, in South Park: Bigger, Longer & Uncut (February 24). Hayes fans also won't want to miss him as the villainous Duke in John Carpenter's Escape from New York, playing on a special double feature with Escape from L.A. on February 20. BLISSFULLY YOURS: CINEMATIC VISION FROM THAILAND It should hardly be surprising that Thailand, with its tropical climate and lush vegetation, should produce a number of motion pictures that feature a sensual tangibility and dreamy images: for instance, a Technicolor™ cowboy dodging a ricocheting bullet in a slow-mo ballet, or a soldier being stalked through a dank forest by his lover in the form of a tiger spirit. These moments, and many more like them, will be on display in the Dryden Theatre during January and February as we present a retrospective of contemporary Thai cinema. Joining Argentina, Iran, and Taiwan as one of the most important emerging national cinemas of the last decade, Thailand actually established its film industry in the 1920s. In the 1930s, Thai movies enjoyed their first "golden age," with a number of studios produc¬ing films. The years after WWII saw a resurgence of the industry, which used 16mm stock to cheaply produce hundreds of films, many of them hard-driving action movies and Thai Westerns. When Hollywood action stars began to dominate the world market in the '80s and '90s, the Thai industry reached a low point in production levels. Nationalism is another subject that frequently turns up in Thai movies, most notably in The Legend of Suriyothai (Feb. 25), which chronicles the sacrifices of a 16th-century Siamese queen against the backdrop of a Burmese invasion. One of the country's most expensive productions, Suriyothai was originally a lengthy television miniseries and eventually edited down to feature length by executive producer Francis Ford Coppola. Critically regarded as first among contemporary Thai film artists is Apichatpong Weerasethakul, an American-educated filmmaker who works largely outside the somewhat restrictive studio system. Apichatpong's works are marked by a sexual frankness and dreamy visual splendor, qualities that are frequently evoked by the titles of his movies, like Blissfully Yours (Feb. 4), Tropical Malady (Feb. 11), and Syndromes and a Century (Feb. 18), all of which have been selected for this series. FEBRUARY 2009 FILMS: 1 SUN | 5 p.m. | Rochester Premiere TROUBLE THE WATER (Tia Lessin & Carl Deal, US 2008, 96 min.) Winner of the Grand Jury Documentary Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, this astonishingly powerful documentary takes you inside Hurricane Katrina in a way never before seen on screen. Trouble the Water utilizes amazing footage shot by Kimberly Rivers Roberts, an aspiring rap artist, and her husband, Scott, as the hurricane begins to rage and the floodwaters fill their world and the screen. Later Kim and Scott's camera captures their harrowing retreat to higher ground and the dramatic rescues of friends and neighbors. Finally, filmmakers Lessin and Deal document the couple's return to New Orleans, the devastation of their neighborhood, and the appalling repeated failures of government. 1 SUN | 7 p.m. | Rochester Premiere THE POOL (Chris Smith, US 2007, 95 min, English/Hindi/subtitles) The director of American Movie has returned with a genuinely heartwarming, humanistic, and remarkably unsentimental work of neorealist fiction. In Goa, India, 18-year-old Venkatesh just barely earns a living cleaning out hotel rooms and selling plastic bags. When he meets the upper-class family who own the glimmering swimming pool he longs to dive into, Venkatesh sees the possibility to escape from his tough existence. Note start time. 3 TUES | 8 p.m. | Isaac Hayes THE BLACK MOSES OF SOUL (Chuck Johnson, US 1973, 80 min.) Advertised as "The Superbad Music Event of a Lifetime!" this ultra-rare concert film captures the dynamic soul performer and songwriter Isaac Hayes at the height of his post-Shaft fame. Employing his trademark narrative "raps," Hayes sings The Look of Love, Never Can Say Goodbye, By the Time I Get to Phoenix, and more. Bonus: Isaac Hayes performance footage from the 1973 film Wattstax. 4 WED | 8 p.m. | Thai Cinema BLISSFULLY YOURS (SUD SANAEHA, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Thailand/France 2002, Thai/Burmese/subtitles, 125 min.) In modern Bangkok, two women are planning to help an illegal Burmese immigrant search for a job; instead, they find themselves entangled in a sexual odyssey in the middle of the jungle. The uniquely framed storyline (the opening credits appear after 45 minutes!) constantly shifts between realism and mythology, bringing the characters from the cynical world of low-wage jobs to an overwhelmingly beautiful wilderness. 5 THURS | 8 p.m. | Film Noir IN A LONELY PLACE (Nicholas Ray, US 1950, 91 min.) In perhaps his most intense performance, Humphrey Bogart plays Dix, a troubled, neurotic screenwriter who is implicated in the murder of a hat-check girl. Laurel (the fabulous Gloria Grahame), Dix's aspiring actress neighbor, provides him with an alibi and the two embark on a tempestuous romance that is constantly threatened by Dix's violent temper. Director Ray's (Rebel Without a Cause) powerful drama is both an indictment of Hollywood and a deeply personal look at human relationships. 6 FRI | 8 p.m. | Rochester Premiere | Curator's Choice WARSAW BRIDGE (PONT DE VARSÒVIA, Pere Portabella, Spain 1990, 85 min., Spanish/subtitles) A wonderfully mad lost masterpiece, Warsaw Bridge is unlike any other movie ever made. Director Portabella, one-time producer for Luis Buñuel, has assembled a series of bizarre images and surreal sequences that play out like a beautiful dream: an unusual concert in a shopping arcade; a verbal chess match; an opera performed at a fish market; credits that appear 30 minutes into the film; and much more. Ostensibly the story of a romantic triangle between a novelist, a conductor, and a marine-biology professor, Portabella's film is actually a love letter to the possibilities of cinema, filled with non sequiturs and nonsense. 7 SAT | 8 p.m. | Emily Hubley in Person! | Rochester Premiere THE TOE TACTIC (Emily Hubley, US 2008, 84 min., Digital Projection) "A kind of free-associative, good-humored surrealism informs The Toe Tactic, a feature by Emily Hubley that combines her squiggly, playful animation (most widely seen in Hedwig and the Angry Inch) with an oblique story about the serendipities of urban life"-A.O. Scott, The New York Times. Mona (Lily Rabe) an unfocused woman in her 20s, learns her mother has sold the family home, setting her off on an emotional and quirkily funny journey where she intersects with a variety of NYC residents. All the while, Mona speaks to a Greek chorus of animated animals (voiced by Eli Wallach, David Cross, Andrea Martin, and others) who offer her lots of opinions and advice. Animator and director Hubley will introduce her feature film debut and answer questions in a post-screening discussion. Co-presented by George Eastman House and the Rochester High Falls International Film Festival. 8 SUN | 2 p.m. | Emily Hubley in Person! A Hubley Family Animation Celebration (Program running time approx. 90 min.) Pioneering animators John Hubley (1914-1977) and wife Faith Hubley (1924-2001) were known for their experimental styles and tendency to evoke genuine human emotions. The Hubleys frequently cast their own children as voice actors for their films. One of their daughters, Emily Hubley, became a celebrated animator and filmmaker herself. This entertaining retrospective highlights several short works of animation by John, Faith, and Emily, including: THE TENDER GAME (1958); the Oscar®-winning MOONBIRD (1958); COCKADOODY (1974); THE TOWER (1984); TALL TIME TALES (1992); HER GRANDMOTHER'S GIFT (1995); ONE SELF: FISH/GIRL (1997); PIGEON WITHIN (2000); BEYOND THE SHADOW PLACE (2000); SET SET SPIKE (2002); and OCTAVE (2006). Emily Hubley will introduce the program and answer questions in a post-screening discussion. Co-presented by George Eastman House and the Rochester High Falls International Film Festival. 8 SUN | 7 p.m. | Rochester Premiere | Curator's Choice WARSAW BRIDGE See February 6. 10 TUES | 8 p.m. | Isaac Hayes | Members' Movie Night SHAFT (Gordon Parks, US 1971, 100 min.) Can you dig it? The godfather of all blaxpoitation films, Shaft blends street-smart dialogue with sex and violence into an irresistible brew that laid the groundwork for dozens of films to follow. Richard Roundtree is the title character, a black private detective who moves to Isaac Hayes's Oscar®-winning score and can more than hold his own in world populated by local gangsters, drug kingpins, and Mafia hitmen. Members admitted free. 11 WED | 8 p.m. | Thai Cinema TROPICAL MALADY (SUD PRALAD, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Thailand 2004, 118 min., Thai/subtitles) Winner of the jury prize at the Cannes Film Festival, Tropical Malady estab¬lished director Weerasethakul as one of the most adventurous filmmakers in the world. The more traditional first half shows the budding romance between a soldier on leave and a shy country boy. In the allegorical second part, the soldier travels through a dark forest, alternately stalking and being stalked by his lover in the form of a tiger spirit, and taking advice from a talking baboon. Leisurely paced and beautifully photographed, this is a film to savor. 12 THURS | Film Noir Double Feature 7 p.m. PITFALL (Andre de Toth, US 1948, 84 min.) 8:30 p.m. NIGHTFALL (Jacques Tourneur, US 1956, 78 min.) These two noir tales of paranoia put the spotlight on their underrated directors, European émigré de Toth (House of Wax) and genre specialist Tourneur (Out of the Past, Cat People). In Pitfall, Dick Powell stars as a married family man who enjoys a dalliance with a blonde femme fatale (noir fan favorite Lizabeth Scott) and incurs the wrath of a psychotically jealous private detective (Raymond Burr). Nightfall finds innocent man Aldo Ray implicated in the death of a friend and on the run from the two gangsters (Brian Keith and Rudy Bond) who did the crime. Our hero finds solace in the arms of Anne Bancroft. Two films for one admission price. 13 FRI | John Carpenter/Kurt Russell Double Feature 7 p.m. THE THING (John Carpenter, US 1982, 108 min.) 9 p.m. BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA (John Carpenter, US 1986, 99 min.) Kurt Russell stars in a pair of classic '80s cult movies directed by his frequent collaborator John Carpenter. First, in Carpenter's slick, scary, and ultra-gory updating of Howard Hawks's '50s sci-fi classic, the arctic setting remains the same, but this time the alien visitor knows where to hide: inside the human body. Then, in Big Trouble in Little China, Russell stars as truck driving Jack Burton in a special-effects romp and variation on the classic Fu Manchu stories. Two films for one admission price. 14 SAT | 8 p.m. | Happy Valentine's Day TO HAVE AND HAVE NOT (Howard Hawks, US 1944, 100 min.) "Sure, you may know how to whistle, but was you ever bit by a dead bee?" Hawks's classic romance/wartime thriller/comedy/musical consistently surprises with its marvelously quirky dialogue (courtesy Jules Furthman and William Faulkner) and unpredictable story. Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall melted many a screen with their chemistry in this '40s film milestone, a masterpiece every bit as memorable as Casablanca. 15 SUN | 7 p.m. | New 35mm Eastman House Preservation! DANCING LADY (Robert Z. Leonard, US 1933, 94 min.) In one of her most successful vehicles for MGM, Joan Crawford stars as a burlesque dancer who works her way up to chorus girl, then leading lady in director Clark Gable's Broadway show. The musical highlight is Crawford's dancing duet with Fred Astaire in his first movie. Comic relief is provided by Robert Benchley and Moe, Larry, and Curly, The Three Stooges. A new 35mm print preserved by George Eastman House will be screened, preceded by THE PARAMOUNT NEWS REVIEW OF 1933 (1933, 10 min.) and Benchley in HOW TO SLEEP (1935, 10 min.). 17 TUES | 8 p.m. | Isaac Hayes TRUCK TURNER (Jonathan Kaplan, US 1974, 91 min.) Isaac Hayes debuted as a leading man and wrote the fantastic soul score for this terrific entry in the '70s "blaxploitation" cycle. Hayes plays the title character, a bounty hunter who runs afoul of the vicious Dorinda (Star Trek's Nichelle Nichols), who in turn assigns slick pimp Harvard Blue (Yaphet Kotto) to put the hit on Truck. Fast-moving, action-packed, and very funny, Truck Turner was an early effort by acclaimed director Kaplan, who would later make Over the Edge and The Accused, among others. 18 WED | 8 p.m. | Thai Cinema SYNDROMES AND A CENTURY (SANG SATTAWAT, Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Thailand 2006, 105 min., Thai/subtitles) Inspired by memories of his parents, both doctors, director Weerasethakul crafts a beautiful and mysterious two-part film. While the first part is set around a rural clinic, and the second in a Bangkok hospital, both feature the same characters and tell essentially the same story. "A quiet masterpiece, delicate and full of wonder"-Jonathan Rosenbaum, Chicago Reader. 19 THURS | 8 p.m. | Film Noir DOUBLE INDEMNITY (Billy Wilder, US 1944, 106 min.) Insurance salesman Walter Neff (Fred MacMurray) finds a respite from his life of beer, bowling, and house calls in the form of Phyllis Dietrichson (Barbara Stanwyck), a married vamp who convinces Neff to help her pull off the "accidental" death of her husband. Wilder's sardonic vision of lust, greed, and murderous boredom, adapted by Wilder and Raymond Chandler from James M. Cain's novel, is one of the unquestioned masterpieces of film noir. 20 FRI | John Carpenter/Kurt Russell Double Feature 7 p.m. ESCAPE FROM NEW YORK (John Carpenter, US 1981, 99 min.) 9 p.m. ESCAPE FROM L.A. (John Carpenter, US 1996, 101 min.) Kurt Russell stars as action movie icon Snake Plissken in a pair of fun, futuristic thrillers directed by John Carpenter. First, career criminal Snake is plunged into 1997 Manhattan, which has been turned into a maximum-security prison for the country's worst criminals. His mission: rescue the US President who's being held hostage inside by the Duke of New York (Isaac Hayes). Then, Snake's sequel takes him to California in 2013, where Los Angeles has also become a penal colony. This time, Snake must look for a valuable destruction device and fight off warring gangs. Two films for one admission price. 21 SAT | 8 p.m. | Rochester Premiere THE DUCHESS OF LANGEAIS (NE TOUCHEZ PAS LA HACHE, Jacques Rivette, France 2007, 137 min., French/subtitles) Honoré de Balzac's novel provides the basis for this lavishly costumed period drama that depicts the frustrated romance between a married duchess (Jeanne Balibar) and a general (the late Guillaume Depardieu in perhaps his finest performance). Director Rivette, a key member of the French nouvelle vague movement, delivers a witty and compelling study of doomed love. 24 TUES | 8 p.m. | Isaac Hayes SOUTH PARK: BIGGER, LONGER & UNCUT (Trey Parker, US 1999, 81 min.) The foul-mouthed animated heroes from cable television's longest-running cartoon show come to the big screen in an Oscar®-nominated musical that was a hit among critics and audiences. When Stan, Kyle, Kenny, and Cartman sneak into a controversial Canadian movie in search of new expletives, they inadvertently set off World War III! One of the funniest movies of the '90s, highlights include a subplot about the rocky "romance" between Saddam Hussein and Satan, and the always-welcoming presence of the kids' mentor Chef (voiced by the late Isaac Hayes). 25 WED | 8 p.m. | Thai Cinema THE LEGEND OF SURIYOTHAI (SURIYOTHAI, Chatri Chalerm Yukol, Thailand 2001, 142 min., Thai/subtitles) Director Yukol's impressive spectacle with astounding set pieces outlines the political intrigue that threatened to paralyze the 16th-century Ayutthayan dy¬nasty as the Burmese began to invade. Focusing on Queen Suriyothai, a shrewd adviser to her husband who made the ultimate sacrifice on the battlefield, this epic was originally produced as a TV miniseries. This theatrical version has been edited by executive producer Francis Ford Coppola, and was funded by the reigning Queen of Thailand as a national history lesson. 26 THURS | 8 p.m. | Film Noir THE LADY FROM SHANGHAI (Orson Welles, US 1947, 87 min.) This quintessential piece of film noir stars a blonde Rita Hayworth as one of the movies' great femmes fatales opposite producer, director, and screenwriter (and second husband) Orson Welles. His cinematic genius is evident in this thrilling story involving lust, betrayal, and murder, particularly in the startling, climactic hall of mirrors sequence. Rochester Premiere | 5 Screenings 27 FRI, 6 p.m. & 8 p.m. | 28 SAT, 4 p.m., 6 p.m. & 8 p.m. WENDY AND LUCY (Kelly Reichardt, US 2008, 80 min.) In an acclaimed performance, Michelle Williams stars as Wendy, a wandering young woman who, on her way to work at a fish cannery in Alaska, winds up broke with a busted car in the Pacific Northwest and only the company of her beloved dog, Lucy. Caught shoplifting to pay for Lucy's food, Wendy is released only to find Lucy has disappeared. Setting out on a quest to find her pet, Wendy encounters an unusual assortment of characters-some helpful, some cruel-along the way. As in her previous feature Old Joy, director Kelly Reichardt reveals a delicate and nuanced style, delivering one of the most heartbreakingly touching yet unsentimental movies in recent memory. Attn. Media: A sample of high-res Dryden stills are online at https://secure.eastmanhouse.org/pressroom/DrydenTheatre/

Quick Links...