eastman-house.jpgVampires, home movies ... and Michael Feinstein are but a few of the many events taking place in October at the George Eastman House International Museum of Photography and Film in Rochester. The month features an eclectic schedule of screenings, performances, lectures and exhibitions, including a photographic commemoration of Rochester's 175th anniversary. EXHIBITION OPENING "Where We Live" now on view through Jan. 24, 2010. This exhibition showcases Rochester in photographs, plus motion pictures, in commemoration of the City of Rochester 175th anniversary in 2009. Featured community photo submissions as well as Rochester through the lens of professional photographers and unique images from the Eastman House collections. Among the variety of photographs featured will be the oldest-known photograph of Rochester (an 1845 daguerreotype); Coloramas, the famed Kodak giant photos from Grand Central Terminal; historic and contemporary images from the City of Rochester's official photographer, featuring the same city scene photographed in the early 20th century, then in 1984, and in 2009; color autochromes of early 20th-century Rochester; a variety of panoramic images of Rochester groups assembled; plus, locally made films from the motion picture collection, projected in the gallery. Eastman House has invited submissions of photographs taken by local citizenry identifying the community's challenges and strengths, for a portion of the exhibition titled "Picturing Rochester." Photographs are still being accepted at eastmanhouse.org. Also featured in this section will be photographs by community leaders and video segments featuring first-person stories. A third section, titled "How Do We Look?" will open Oct. 17, offering a view of Rochester from three internationally known photographers. Included with museum admission. Presented in partnership with JP Morgan Chase Foundation. 4 Sunday, 3 to 4 p.m. MUSICALE Joe Blackburn presents an organ recital in the Conservatory, as Eastman House presents Sunday afternoon musicales like George Eastman used to. Included with museum admission. 8 Thursday, 6 to 7 p.m. "WISH YOU WERE HERE" PHOTOGRAPHY LECTURE Photographer Sylvia Plachy, Guggenheim Fellowship recipient, presents "Attractions," a presentation of photographs that span decades and locations, with groupings of images that become "a dance of ghosts." Her work has appeared in many publications, including The New York Times, The Village Voice, and The New Yorker. This is part of the "Wish You Were Here" lecture series, which brings a variety of world-renowned photographers and photographic experts to the Dryden Theatre to discuss their work. Included with museum admission. For more information on individual lectures, visit eastmanhouse.org. 11 Sunday, 4 p.m. MICHAEL FEINSTEIN IN CONCERT Michael Feinstein Benefit Concert for George Eastman House. Ambassador of "The Great American Songbook" and four-time Grammy® nominee Michael Feinstein performs an intimate concert of Broadway and film classics, as well as the songs of George and Ira Gershwin, to benefit George Eastman House in honor of its 60th anniversary. Feinstein will also be presented with the title of Eastman Honorary Scholar for his work on music in film. Concert takes place at Hochstein School of Music, 50 N. Plymouth Ave., Rochester. Tickets: Platinum Tickets including Elite Seating and Post-Concert Reception with Michael Feinstein $250; Gold Tickets with Premium Seating $100; Silver Tickets $60 ($55 Members). All tickets are available at www.eastmanhouse.org and (585) 271-3361 ext. 218. For more information, visit eastmanhouse.org. Sponsored by M&T Bank. 15 Thursday, 6 to 7 p.m. "WISH YOU WERE HERE" PHOTOGRAPHY LECTURE Photographer Pep Bonet presents the illustrated lecture "The Evolution of a Photographic Language." Bonet, whose awards include Kodak Young Photographer of the Year and The W. Eugene Smith Grant, looks at 10 years of shooting, including his images of Darfur, Somalia, Haiti, and Sierra Leone. Bonet is a founding member of the photo agency Noor and will be one of three professional photographers featured in the Eastman House exhibition How Do We Look?, opening Oct. 17. This lecture, which is sponsored by Kodak, is part of the "Wish You Were Here" lecture series, which brings a variety of world-renowned photographers and photographic experts to the Dryden Theatre to discuss their work. Included with museum admission. For more information on individual lectures, visit eastmanhouse.org. 17 Saturday EXHIBITION OPENING How Do We Look? opens today, on view through Jan. 24, 2010, part of the fall exhibition Where We Live. This display offer a view of Rochester from three internationally known photographers, who have been commissioned to travel to Rochester to photograph its people and places in August and September. Subjects include "Black In Rochester," Kodak, and Rochester's music scene. The photographers are Pet Bonet, Kristen Ashburn, and Magnum photographer Eli Reed. 17 Saturday, 2 to 5 p.m. HOME MOVIE DAY Home Movie Day is a worldwide celebration of home movies and amateur films that provides the opportunity for communities to see and share home movies, and learn how best to care for them. George Eastman House has teamed up with Visual Studies Workshop to present Home Movie Day in Rochester. Event location is Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince St. In recognition of the City of Rochester's 175th anniversary, sites and landmarks of the Rochester area are particularly encouraged. Bring in your 8mm, super-8, or 16mm films, which will be inspected by trained archivists and technicians. Drop-off dates for film - so reels can be inspected and prepped for projection in advance — can be found online at homemovieday.com/rochester.html or call (585) 271-3361 ext. 370. Admission is free but donations are accepted. 18 Sunday, 3 to 4 p.m. MUSICALE Kathy Wilkins and Trevor Babb, soprano and classical guitarist, perform in the Living Room, as Eastman House presents Sunday afternoon musicales like George Eastman used to. Included with museum admission. 22 Thursday, 6 to 7 p.m. "WISH YOU WERE HERE" PHOTOGRAPHY LECTURE Photographer Ernesto Bazan will present and discuss his photographs of Cuba. Bazan lived and photographed in Cuba for 14 years, discovering moments in Cuban life that only an extremely sensitive outsider-turned-insider could possibly find. Honored with a Guggenheim Fellowship and The W. Eugene Smith Grant, he has published four books and conducts photo workshops on Latin America. This lecture is part of the "Wish You Were Here" lecture series, which brings a variety of world-renowned photographers and photographic experts to the Dryden Theatre to discuss their work. Included with museum admission. For more information on individual lectures, visit eastmanhouse.org. 24 Saturday 8 p.m. SPECIAL FILM EVENT: ROBIN HOOD WITH ORCHESTRA Robin Hood Special Presentation. Conductor-musicologist Gillian Anderson and an 11-piece orchestra perform her reconstruction of the original score that will accompany the silent masterpiece Robin Hood (Allan Dwan, US 1922, 133 min.), starring Douglas Fairbanks. This new 35mm tinted print of the film was restored to its original length by George Eastman House and the Museum of Modern Art, and highlights the Seventh Biennial Conference for Robin Hood Studies at the University of Rochester. Tickets: $15, $10 members/students. (No Take 10s or passes accepted.) Dryden Theatre. Co-presented by George Eastman House and University of Rochester's Humanities Project, Cluster on Premodern Studies, Department of English, and Department of Rare Books. 25 Sunday, 3 to 4 p.m. MUSICALE Mark Weeg and Kathy Wilkins perform fiddle and piano in the Living Room, as Eastman House presents Sunday afternoon musicales like George Eastman used to. Included with museum admission. 29 Thursday, 6 to 7 p.m. "WISH YOU WERE HERE" PHOTOGRAPHY LECTURE World Traveler Thomas N. Tischer presents the illustrated lecture "Have We Forgotten Streetcars?" He will discuss the role streetcars and trolleys played in the development of U.S. cities and their European counterparts. This lecture is part of the "Wish You Were Here" lecture series, which brings a variety of world-renowned photographers and photographic experts to the Dryden Theatre to discuss their work. Included with museum admission. For more information on individual lectures, visit eastmanhouse.org. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- CONTINUING EXHIBITIONS OCTOBER 2009 Where We Live -- Opening Oct. 3, 2009 (South Gallery, Brackett Clark Gallery, Potter Peristyle) Picturing Rochester -- Opening Oct. 3, 2009 (Potter Peristyle, Project Space) What We're Collecting Now: The Family Photographed -- Ongoing (New Acquisitions Gallery) Where Do Cameras Come From? -- Ongoing (Second floor of house) Cameras from the Technology Collection -- Ongoing (Mees Gallery) The Remarkable George Eastman -- Ongoing (Second floor of house) -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- CALENDAR OF FILM EVENTS OCTOBER 2009 Please note: Sunday films are screened at 7 p.m. unless otherwise noted. Films listed begin at 8 p.m. in the Dryden Theatre, except for Sunday evening films, which begin at 7 p.m., and those otherwise noted. Dryden Theatre general admission tickets are $7 and George Eastman House members and student ticket rates are $5, unless otherwise noted. "Take-10" discount tickets (10 admissions for $55/$40 members and students) are available at the box office and the Museum Shop. The film program is partially funded by the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York State Council on the Arts. FEATURED FILM SERIES Our Flesh and Blood: A Disabilities Film Series The Dryden Theatre at George Eastman House presents every Wednesday in October a series of films and documentaries that focus on persons with disabilities, titled Our Flesh and Blood. The series began in September. "Each of these films demonstrates the power of cinema to connect us with those who seem different, but, which in the end, remind us that all of us, disabled or not, share the same aspirations for life," said Jim Healy, assistant curator of motion pictures at Eastman House. "We are all flesh and blood." With few exceptions, the lives of persons with severe disabilities are not frequently explored in popular commercial cinema. Such films, however, can be inspiring and enriching experiences, at least if the filmmakers are successful in depicting the worlds of the disabled in ways that uplift or challenge our preconceptions — like the features and documentaries selected for this series. This series is co-presented by George Eastman House, the Ithaca College School of Health Sciences and Human Performance, and Strong Center for Developmental Disabilities—Golisano Children's Hospital at Strong. At press time, organizations providing additional support include Al Sigl Community of Agencies; Colgate Rochester Crozier Divinity School; Heritage Christian Services; Hillside Children's Center; The Regional Center for Independent Living; and the University of Rochester School of Nursing, University Office for Faculty Development & Diversity, and Faculty Disabilities Cluster. 20TH ANNUAL ROCHESTER LABOR FILM SERIES In September and October 2009, the Dryden Theatre and the Rochester Labor Council join forces again for a 20th season of motion pictures celebrating international citizens who work for a living. From China, a nation still in the midst of an economic revolution, comes acclaimed filmmaker Jia Zhangke's 24 City (October 9), a part-fiction/part documentary look at what happened when an aircraft plant with more than 20,000 employees was demolished to make way for luxury condominiums. There are two series selections that explore the lives of the poor and working-class in South America. First, in the seriocomic The Pope's Toilet (October 2), a penniless, always-scheming entrepreneur tries to cash in on a visit from John Paul II by installing a pay-per-use potty in his impoverished Uruguayan village. Then, in Oblivion (October 16), Dutch filmmaker Hedy Honigmann visits with the people of Lima, Peru: bartenders, shoeshine boys, small business owners, and gymnasts and jugglers who perform at traffic stops. Vintage Hollywood pictures also get their due on October 23 with a '30s double feature of Three-Cornered Moon and Mills of the Gods, two movies that offer slices of life from that other economic disaster, the Great Depression. FANGS FOR THE MEMORIES: A VAMPIRE MOVIE RETROSPECTIVE Prepare to roam (and fly) with the children of the night. Leading up to Halloween in October, we've assembled no fewer than 17 vampire movies, in single and double feature programs, ranging from the ridiculous-like the Dracula spoof Love at First Bite (screening on October 8), to the iconic-Bela Lugosi as Count Dracula in the first sound version of Bram Stoker's novel (showing with Mark of the Vampire on October 1). Apropos of that book, there are four other screen versions of Dracula on view as well: Nosferatu (October 29), F.W. Murnau's marvelously creepy unofficial adaptation; the Hammer Studios' colorful Horror of Dracula (paired with Hammer's bizarre Vampire Circus on October 6), featuring Christopher Lee in his most famous role as the bat-morphing title character; Francis Ford Coppola's lavish, star-studded 1992 effort, officially titled Bram Stoker's Dracula; and Guy Maddin's dreamlike Dracula: Pages from a Virgin's Diary (October 27), inspired by a Royal Canadian Ballet production. Contemporary American variations on the myth are represented by John Carpenter's Vampires (October 15), which depicts a group of macho, modern-day Van Helsings in a storyline not unlike a classic Western; Neil Jordan's big-screen version of Anne Rice's bestseller Interview with the Vampire (October 22), a movie (and book) fascinated by what it means to live forever; and Abel Ferrara's philosophical indie The Addiction, doubled up with Kathryn Bigelow's Southern-fried Near Dark on October 18. Carl Dreyer's Vampyr (showing with the Lugosi B-movie Return of the Vampire on October 4) is a Danish take on the coffin-dwellers, and a certifiable arthouse classic. Vampirism meets lesbianism in the Eurotrash cult classic Daughters of Darkness, shown as part of this year's ImageOut Festival on an October 13 double bill with Dracula's Daughter, which also explores the genre's link with Sapphic love (see inside for special ImageOut ticket details). We hammer a stake into the series on October 31 with the Dryden's top-drawing film so far in 2009, the creepily atmospheric, yet poignant Swedish teen vampire love story Let the Right One In, preceded by a thrilling selection of bloodsucker trailers. Now here's a series you can really sink your teeth into. OCTOBER FILM CALENDAR: 1 THURS | Fangs Double Feature 7 p.m. DRACULA (Tod Browning, US 1931, 75 min.) 8:30 p.m. MARK OF THE VAMPIRE (Tod Browning, US 1935, 61 min.) Bela Lugosi stars in a double dose of horror from director Tod Browning. First, Lugosi brings to life his signature role of Count Dracula in the Universal Pictures classic, the first official screen adaptation of Bram Stoker's novel. Then, in Mark of the Vampire, a remake of Browning's legendary "lost" silent film London After Midnight, the two Lionels, Barrymore and Atwill, play a vampire expert and police inspector investigating a murder that may or may not have been committed by the mysterious Count Mora (Lugosi). Don't miss the amazing twist ending! Two films for one admission price. 2 FRI 8 p.m. Labor | Rochester Premiere THE POPE'S TOILET (EL BAÑO DEL PAPA, César Charlone & Enrique Fernández, Uruguay 2007, 95 min., Spanish/subtitles) During a 1988 visit by John Paul II, Popemania grips a small, impoverished Uruguayan town bordering Brazil. Penniless hero Beto, expecting thousands of Brazilians to pour into his village, decides to build a pay toilet in his yard, an enterprise that requires more than a bit of ingenuity, and blind optimism. Cinematographer César Charlone (City of God) co-directs a thoughtful and frequently funny study of desperate capitalism. 3 SAT 8 p.m. | Rochester Premiere SOMERS TOWN (Shane Meadows, UK 2008, 70 min.) In a tour de force, 16-year-old Thomas Turgoose (child star of director Meadows's excellent This is England) plays Tomo, a tough-but-sweet homeless kid who finds refuge and friendship with Marek, a shy Polish émigré. In a charming story that stylistically recalls the realistic British dramas of the early 1960s, Tomo and Marek scheme for money, fight off bullies, and become rivals for the affections of a young French waitress. Preceded by ODD SHOE (Paul Cotter, UK 2008, 10 min.). 4 SUN | Fangs Double Feature 7 p.m. VAMPYR (Carl Th. Dreyer, Denmark 1933, 73 min., German/subtitles, 16mm) 8:30 p.m. THE RETURN OF THE VAMPIRE (Lew Landers, US 1943, 69 min.) In Dreyer's moody and dreamlike Vampyr, one of the most celebrated arthouse horror films of all time, a supernatural investigator learns of a vampire-witch, her victims, and her evil human accomplices. The Return of the Vampire stars Bela Lugosi as the title character in a weird amalgam of wartime propaganda and the horror film. The ending is a doozy! Two films for one admission price. 5 1:30 p.m. MONDAY — SENIOR MATINEE (free to those age 60 an over) The Greatest Show on Earth (Cecil B. DeMille, Us 1952, 76 min.) 6 TUES | Fangs Double Feature 7 p.m. HORROR OF DRACULA —(Terence Fisher, UK 1958, 82 min.) 8:30 p.m. VAMPIRE CIRCUS Robert Young, UK 1971, 87 min.) The first half of this double feature from the legendary Hammer Studios is a full throttle Technicolor™ retelling of the Bram Stoker classic that made international stars out of Christopher Lee (as the Count) and Peter Cushing (as Van Helsing). Hammer's Vampire Circus is a highly unusual cult item about a 19th-century traveling show where all of the acts, even the animals, are members of the parasitic undead. Two films for one admission price. 7 WED 8 p.m. | Disabilities SICK: THE LIFE AND TIMES OF BOB FLANAGAN, SUPERMASOCHIST (Kirby Dick, US 1997, 89 min, Digital Projection) Sick chronicles performance artist and poet Bob Flanagan's life as one of the oldest living survivors of cystic fibrosis. Director Kirby Dick turns his camera on Flanagan and the artist's use of the bodily pain inflicted in his S/M practice as a means of surviving the pain of his terminal illness. No one under 18 admitted. 8 THURS 8 p.m. | Fangs LOVE AT FIRST BITE (Stan Dragoti, US 1979, 96 min.) The perennially tan George Hamilton incongruously stars as the alabaster Count Dracula, who, evicted from his Transylvanian castle, relocates to New York City in order to woo a flighty model (Susan Saint James) he has long admired. Richard Benjamin co-stars as a psychiatrist who utilizes every possible vampire killing ritual and then some to fend off his romantic rival. 9 FRI 8 p.m. | Labor | Rochester Premiere 24 CITY (Jia Zhangke, China 2008, 112 min., Mandarin/subtitles) The latest from acclaimed mainland Chinese director Jia Zhangke (Platform, The World) is a masterful study of a formerly top-secret aircraft plant in Chengdu City, Sichuan, that is slated to be demolished and converted into 24 City, a luxury housing complex. Jia offers an oral history of the plant in a series of compelling monologues, some delivered by actual workers, others by professional actors (like Joan Chen) representing the more than 20,000 displaced workers. 10 SAT & 11 SUN ImageOut Film Festival Screenings For ticket information on all ImageOut films, call (585) 271-2640 or visit www.imageout.org. No Take-10 tickets or passes. 13 TUES | ImageOut of the Archives | Fangs Double Feature 7:30 p.m. DRACULA'S DAUGHTER (Lambert Hillyer, US 1936, 70 min.) 9 p.m. DAUGHTERS OF DARKNESS (LES LÈVRES ROUGES, Harry Kümel, Belgium/France/West Germany 1971, 100 min.) First, Gloria Holden stars as Dracula's Daughter, who, disavowing her daddy's evil ways, turns to a doctor to help cure her "in the blood" vampirism. Then, in the cult classic Daughters of Darkness, arthouse legend Delphine Seyrig plays a mysterious and decadent woman who may or may not be Elizabeth Bathory, the countess who murdered scores of virgins for their blood centuries before. For ticket information on all ImageOut films, call (585) 271-2640 or visit www.imageout.org. No Take-10 tickets or passes. 14 WED | Disabilities 7:30 p.m. LOCKED-IN SYNDROME (Jean-Jacques Beineix, France 1997, 27 min., French/subtitles) 8 p.m. THE DIVING BELL AND THE BUTTERFLY (Julian Schnabel, France 2007, 112 min., French/subtitles) Diving Bell depicts French fashion journalist Jean-Dominique Bauby's struggle with locked-in syndrome after suffering a debilitating stroke. This Oscar®-nominated dramatization of Bauby's memoirs, which he dictated by way of blinks correlated to letters of the French alphabet, is directed by neo-expressionist painter Julian Schnabel (Basquiat) and stars the immensely talented Mathieu Amalric (the villain in the most recent James Bond film Quantum of Solace). The feature will be preceded by a short documentary from Diva director Beineix showing the real Bauby at work. 15 THURS 8 p.m. | Fangs JOHN CARPENTER'S VAMPIRES (John Carpenter, US 1998, 107 min.) The director of Halloween and The Thing focuses on the creatures of the night. A group of macho, modern-day Van Helsings (led by James Woods) scour the American Southwest for a vampire who is close to finding a way to exist in daylight. Great action sequences, sardonic humor, and Carpenter's arresting visuals (and music) make for a kick-ass entertainment. 16 FRI 8 p.m. | Labor | Rochester Premiere OBLIVION (Heddy Honigmann, The Netherlands 2008, 93 min., Spanish/subtitles) The working-class people of Lima, Peru—bartenders, street entertainers, shopkeepers-are the affectionate subjects of this moving documentary that shows how many of the city's poorest citizens have survived decades of economic crises, political corruption, and denial of worker's rights. Born in Lima, Dutch filmmaker Honigmann (Forever) offers interviews of these resourceful Peruvians who have resisted being consigned to oblivion. 17 SAT ImageOut Film Festival Screenings For ticket information on all ImageOut films, call (585) 271-2640 or visit www.imageout.org. No Take-10 tickets or passes. 18 SUN | Fangs Double Feature 7 p.m. THE ADDICTION (Abel Ferrara, US 1995, 82 min.) 8:30 p.m. NEAR DARK (Kathryn Bigelow, US 1987, 95 min.) In the intellectually intriguing The Addiction, Lili Taylor stars as a philosophy grad student who, appalled by the atrocities of history, becomes an unstoppable devouring vampire. Director Ferrara gets the most out of beautiful black-and-white cinematography and a cast that includes Christopher Walken. Near Dark, from The Hurt Locker director Bigelow, shows what happens when a country boy (Heroes' Adrian Pasdar) falls in with a predatory group of hillbilly vampires (led by Lance Henriksen and Bill Paxton) who date back to the Civil War. Two films for one admission price. 19 1:30 p.m. MONDAY -- SENIOR MATINEE (free to those age 60 an over) TWENTIETH CENTURY (Howard Hawks, US 1934, 91 min.) 20 TUES 8 p.m. | Fangs BRAM STOKER'S DRACULA (Francis Ford Coppola, US 1992, 123 min.) Never has there been a more fashionable and elegantly coiffed Dracula than Gary Oldman in Coppola's version of the oft-told tale, co-starring Winona Ryder as Mina, and Keanu Reeves as her fiancée, Jonathan Harker. Oldman manages to make the Count a sympathetic grieving lover, and visual style pours out of every frame. Anthony Hopkins plays Dracula's arch-nemesis Van Helsing, and Tom Waits appears as the bug-eating Renfield. 21 WED 8 p.m. | Disabilities LORENZO'S OIL (George Miller, US 1992, 135 min.) When their son Lorenzo is diagnosed with the incurable degenerative disease adrenoleukodystrophy, Michaela and Augusto Odone (Susan Sarandon and Nick Nolte) face the impossible odds and set out to find a cure. This inspiring and suspenseful true story will keep you riveted thanks to perfect direction from Mad Max and Babe auteur George Miller, a trained physician. 22 THURS 8 p.m. | Fangs | Members' Movie Night INTERVIEW WITH THE VAMPIRE (Neil Jordan, US 1994, 122 min.) This blockbuster adaptation of Ann Rice's bestseller begins when 200-year-old Louis (Brad Pitt) recalls the story of his unsatisfying life as a vampire to a writer (Christian Slater). Louis's story is intertwined with that of the more decadent Lestat (Tom Cruise), the bloodsucker whose bite brought Louis to the world of the undead. Director Jordan (The Crying Game, Mona Lisa) brings style to spare and the supporting cast includes Antonio Banderas, Stephen Rea, and Kirsten Dunst. Members admitted free. 23 FRI | Labor Double Feature! 7 p.m. THREE-CORNERED MOON (Elliot Nugent, US 1933, 77 min.) 8:30 p.m. MILLS OF THE GODS (Roy William Neill, US 1934, 66 min.) Perhaps the first genuine "screwball comedy," Three-Cornered Moon shows what happens when a previously well-off family (including daughter Claudette Colbert) face the Depression and are forced to (gasp) work! Then, in Mills, plow-factory owner and matriarch May Robson finds that her trust fund kids just don't give a darn as her business goes bust. As rioting workers battle police, her granddaughter (Fay Wray) finds solidarity and love with a union leader (Victor Jory). Two films for one admission price. 24 SAT 8 p.m. | Special Presentation ROBIN HOOD (Allan Dwan, US 1922, 133 min.) Douglas Fairbanks stars as the legendary bandit of Sherwood Forest, who steals from the rich to give to the poor. The first picture in history to cost $1 million was also Fairbanks's ninth collaboration with pioneering director Allan Dwan. A stunt-filled spectacular, Dwan's silent masterpiece has been restored to its original length in a new 35mm tinted print by George Eastman House and the Museum of Modern Art, and will be accompanied by an 11-piece orchestra conducted by Gillian Anderson, performing her reconstruction of the original 1922 score. This screening forms the centerpiece of the Seventh Biennial Conference for Robin Hood Studies at the University of Rochester. Tickets: $15, $10 members and students. No Take 10s or passes accepted. Co-presented by George Eastman House and University of Rochester's Humanities Project, Cluster on Premodern Studies, Department of English, and Department of Rare Books. 25 SUN 7 p.m. | Rochester Premiere IL DIVO (Paolo Sorrentino, Italy 2008, 110 min., Italian/subtitles) One of the most stylish films released this year, Il Divo follows the spectacular life and career of Giulio Andreotti (played by Toni Servillo), Italy's most powerful, feared, and enigmatic politician. This violent political biopic begins as Andreotti commences his seventh term as Prime Minister, and the Christian Democrat party crumbles in a nationwide bribery scandal. Suspicion begins to fall on Andreotti himself as the center of a shocking conspiracy involving the Vatican, the Mafia, and a secret neo-Fascist society. "As operatic cinema, it ranks alongside the best of Martin Scorsese and Francis Ford Coppola"—Stephen Holden, The New York Times. 26 1:30 p.m. MONDAY -- SENIOR MATINEE (free to those age 60 an over) SOME LIKE IT HOT (Billy Wilder, US 1959, 120 min.) 27 TUES 8 p.m. | Fangs DRACULA: PAGES FROM A VIRGIN'S DIARY (Guy Maddin, Canada 2002, 75 min.) Cult Canadian director Maddin has taken a Royal Winnipeg Ballet version of Bram Stoker's classic with music by Gustav Mahler, and turned it into a black-and-white horror show that resembles no other vampire movie ever made. Maddin, inspired by late silent and early sound era movies, keeps his story moving along with plenty of gothically ornate melodrama, costumes, and production design. 28 WED 8 p.m. | Disabilities | Rochester Premiere THE HORSE BOY (Rupert Isaacson & Michael Orion Scott, US 2009, 93 min.) How far would you travel to heal someone you love? An intensely personal yet epic spiritual journey, The Horse Boy follows one Texas couple and their autistic son as they trek on horseback through Outer Mongolia in a desperate attempt to treat his condition with shamanic healing. The filmic companion to co-director Isaacson's best-selling book of the same name, this ravishing documentary odyssey and festival favorite gives insight into how, in life's darkest moments, one can find the gateway to joy and wonder. 29 THURS 8 p.m. | Fangs NOSFERATU (F.W. Murnau, Germany 1922, 81 min.) Murnau, an undisputed master of German expressionist cinema, tells the screen's first feature-length adaptation of Bram Stoker's Dracula. Eerily symbolic, memorably horrific and unsettling, it remains the most imaginative, stylized, and hypnotic of all vampire movies. Live piano by Philip C. Carli. 30 FRI 8 p.m. | Labor LAILA'S BIRTHDAY (Rashid Masharawi, Palestine 2008, 75 min., Arabic/subtitles) A former Palestinian judge (the excellent Mohamed Bakri) is forced to make a living working as a taxi driver in occupied Ramallah when the government runs out of funds to pay his wages. Set on the day of his daughter's seventh birthday, the judge faces all kinds of obstacles on his simple mission to bring home a cake and presents. Wonderfully compelling and eye-opening in its episodic storytelling, Laila's Birthday reveals the frustrating daily existence for an average, politically moderate citizen of Palestine. 31 FRI 8 p.m. | Labor 7 p.m. Vampire Trailers! 8 p.m. LET THE RIGHT ONE IN (Tomas Alfredson, Sweden 2008, 113 min., Swedish/subtitles) Plagued by school bullies, 12-year-old Oskar finds a friend and his first crush in Eli, a seemingly young girl who lives in his working-class apartment block. What Oskar doesn't know is that his protective new friend is an ageless vampire, and an ongoing murder spree is the result of her thirst for human blood. Director Alfredson's scary-and surprisingly touching-new genre hybrid has already developed a considerable international fanbase, and won several awards at major film festivals around the world. This screening will be preceded by an hour of trailers for various vampire films from the 1940s to the present. Two programs for one admission price. Attn. Media: A sample of high-res Dryden stills are online at https://secure.eastmanhouse.org/pressroom/DrydenTheatre/