museum-of-the-city-of-new-york.jpgNew York, N.Y. - Among the New York City's major museums, there is only one with the words "New," "York," and "City" in its name, and this is precisely what gives the Museum of the City of New York (1220 Fifth Avenue; http://www.mcny.org/ ) its unique mandate: to explore the past, present, and future of this fascinating and particular place and to celebrate its heritage of diversity, opportunity, and perpetual transformation. A variety of exhibitions, public programs, and publications all investigate what gives New York City its singular character. Check out their great upcoming events: The Speakeasy at 1220 Fifth Avenue WEDNESDAYS NIGHTS JUNE 30 - AUGUST 18, 2010 6:00 - 9:00 PM The Museum of the City of New York presents The Speakeasy at 1220 Fifth Avenue on Wednesday nights, 6 - 9 p.m. in July & August. Enjoy cocktails on the Fifth Avenue terrace and a special installation on the fictional 1920s character "Flapper Jane." Visitors will be treated to tours of current exhibitions, live music, DJs, an antique car show, and other special events throughout the summer. For a detailed schedule of events featured during The Speakeasy at 1220 Fifth Avenue, visit www.mcny.org. Admission includes one FREE drink and access to the Museum's first- and second-floor galleries. Tickets sold online and at the door. Rain or shine! Museum Members: $10 • Non-Members: $15 SATURDAY • JULY 17 • 1:00 PM Cars, Culture, and the City: Gallery Tour Join co-curator Donald Albrecht for a tour of the first exhibition to explore New York City's century-long relationship with the car: Cars, Culture, and the City. Discover how the city accommodated the car by building massive bridges, tunnels, and parkways, while, as the nation's media center, New York presented the world's fairs and held the auto shows that manufactured the magic of American car culture. Free with Museum admission. SUNDAY • JULY 25 • 1:00 PM Samurai in New York: Gallery Tour Join Project Director Kathleen Benson and Yasuko Tsuchikane of The School of Art and Design History and Theory at New School University for an overview of the exhibition with a special focus on the late 19th century Japanese wood block prints that enrich it. Free with Museum admission. MONDAY • JULY 26 • 6:30 PM Play Ball: The 80th Anniversary of the First Negro League Game at Yankee Stadium On July 5, 1930, the first Negro League baseball game was played at Yankee Stadium, ushering in a new era in American professional sports. In addition to its historical importance, the game was also a benefit for the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, the first African-American labor organization to receive a charter from the American Federation of Labor. Join Negro League players Bob Scott and Jim Robinson, Dr. Lawrence Hogan, professor and author of Shades of Glory: The Negro Leagues and the Story of African-American Baseball (National Geographic, 2006), and baseball historian John Thorn for a conversation about the game, the times, and what the anniversary tells us about how America has, and hasn't, changed in the last 80 years. Reservations required. $6, Museum members; $12, non-members; $8, seniors and students. TUESDAY • JULY 27 • 6:30 PM Collecting Decorative Arts: A Conversation with Maryalice Huggins and James Tottis Join the Museum of the City of New York for the opening of its newly refurbished gallery of New York furniture with several distinguished experts. Maryalice Huggins, renowned furniture restorer, will discuss her new book, Aesop's Mirror: A Love Story, with independent curator James Tottis, who led the restoration of the gallery, in a conversation focusing on connoisseurship and what decorative arts can tell us about New York City history. A reception to view the restored gallery will follow the program. Reservations required. $6, Museum members; $12, Non-members; $8, Seniors and students. THURSDAY • JULY 29 • 6:30 PM The Bungalows of Rockaway: Film Screening The New York City premiere of The Bungalows of Rockaway, a documentary that takes a modest subject -- the small, affordable bungalows that once covered the Rockaway peninsula -- and reveals larger themes of this singular story: working class leisure, public access to the ocean, community, and architectural preservation. A popular summer resort once existed along the Rockaway shore, the traces now found in the remaining bungalows and long boardwalk. Bungalow residents past and present are featured, along with narrator Estelle Parsons, historians, and city officials. Tracking the bungalow lifeline from 1905 to the present, the film incorporates gorgeous archival imagery with recent footage and interviews, to produce an enlightening and entertaining look at unsung chapter of New York history. Reservations required. $6, Museum members; $12, Non-members; $8, Seniors and students. TUESDAY • AUGUST 3 • 6:30 PM Gay Rights in the 1960s and Today In June of 1969, the Stonewall Riots, a six-day series of protests, demonstrations, and confrontations between the city's gay community and the police, sparked a new phase in the civil rights movement. Almost all of the most critical events that redefined the movement for gay equality, including Stonewall and the birth of Gay Liberation, occurred during the Lindsay administration. Join historian David Carter, author of Stonewall: The Riots that Sparked the Gay Revolution, as he moderates a discussion with key figures in the gay rights movements of the Lindsay era and today. Featuring Dick Leitsch, President of the New York Mattachine Society, and Rich Wandel of the Gay Activists Alliance. Presented in conjunction with the exhibition America's Mayor: John V. Lindsay and the Reinvention of New York. This Mark E. Ouderkirk Memorial Program exploring lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender culture and history is generously supported by The Ted Snowdon Foundation. Reservations required. $6, Museum members; $12, Non-members; $8, Seniors and students. THURSDAY • AUGUST 5 • 6:30 PM The Future of the Car in the City New York's streets are contested space, with pedestrians, bicyclists, cars, buses, and trucks all jockeying for room. Although New Yorkers have one of the lowest rates of vehicle ownership, the negative impacts of cars-pollution, declining street safety, and congestion-are becoming increasingly clear and demand thoughtful solutions. What strategies will keep things moving-car-free "eco-zones," congestion pricing, peak metering, or others-in light of increased pressures on the streetscape? Join panelists Vishaan Chakrabarti, Marc Holliday Professor of Real Estate and Director of the Real Estate Development program in the Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation at Columbia University, Shin-pei Tsay, Deputy Director of Transportation Alternatives, and others for a discussion on the future of the car in New York. Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Cars, Culture, and the City. Reservations required. $6, Museum members; $12, Non-members; $8, Seniors and students. THURSDAY • AUGUST 19 • 6:30 PM The Strike That Changed New York: Ocean Hill-Brownsville, the Politics of Education, & Race Relations in New York City In the fall of 1968, the United Federation of Teachers went on strike to protest the experiment in community controlled schools then underway in the city and centered in the Ocean Hill-Brownsville district. Schools were closed for months and the politics of race in New York were permanently and profoundly restructured. Clarence Taylor, professor and author of Knocking At Our Own Door: Milton A. Galamison and the Struggle to Integrate New York City Schools, and Jerald Podair, professor and author of The Strike That Changed New York: Blacks, Whites, and the Ocean Hill-Brownsville Crisis, will discuss the crisis and its aftermath with the Reverend Herbert Oliver, Chairman of the Ocean Hill-Brownsville local school board, and other participants from both sides of the struggle. Presented in conjunction with the exhibition America's Mayor: John V. Lindsay and the Reinvention of New York. Reservations required. $6, Museum members; $12, Non-members; $8, Seniors and students. TUESDAY
  • AUGUST 24 6:30 PM
The Story of Sushi:
Secrets of the Cuisine from Japan to New York Iron Chef America judge Trevor Corson, bestselling author of The Story of Sushi: An Unlikely Saga of Raw Fish & Rice (Harper Perennial, 2008) and a "Sushi Concierge" at New York's Michelin-starred Jewel Bako restaurant, moderates a lively conversation about the surprising transformation of sushi, from 19th-century Japan, when the first Japanese delegation to New York City arrived 150 years ago, to sushi's very different forms in Japan and New York today. The panel will also include several of the most interesting new sushi chefs in the New York area today, revivalists working to infuse both old and new traditions into the cuisine, including Bun Lai, chef at Miya's Sushi, the only sustainable sushi restaurant on the East Coast. Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Samurai in New York: The First Japanese Delegation, 1860. Reservations required. $6, Museum members; $12, Non-members; $8, Seniors and students. FAMILY PROGRAMS SATURDAY • JULY 17 • 2:00 PM Samurai Sword Soul: Family Performance Join Samurai Sword Soul for a performance of choreographed sword fighting, featuring an engaging mix of comedy routines, humanistic-themed drama, and thrilling sword fights set to music. Samurai Sword Soul is a theater company whose mission is to spread the BUSHI-DO, the Way of Samurai. Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Samurai in New York: The First Japanese Delegation, 1860. Free with Museum admission. SATURDAY • AUGUST 21 • 2:00 PM - 4:00 PM Japanese Folding Fans: Family Workshop Enjoy an afternoon exploring the exhibition Samurai in New York: The First Japanese Delegation, 1860, then create your own Japanese inspired folding fans based on the designs and textiles brought to New York by the first Japanese delegation in 1860. Free with Museum admission. SATURDAY • AUGUST 28 • 3:00 PM Japanese Taiko Drum: Family Performance Join Taikoza, a thunderous Japanese percussion group that uses large, barrel-like taiko drums, shakuhachi, bamboo flutes known as fue, and the Koto - a 13-stringed instrument, for a fabulous performance of music and dance based on forms traditionally performed at Japanese festivals. The audience will be introduced to all of the instruments and learn the history of the festivals they represent. Presented in collaboration with Community Works and in conjunction with the exhibition Samurai in New York: The First Japanese Delegation, 1860. Free with Museum admission.

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Contact: Alison Leiby Communications Associate Museum of the City of New York 1220 Fifth Avenue New York, NY 10029 212.534.1672 ext. 3396 http://www.mcny.org/