museum-of-the-city-of-new-york.jpgNew York, N.Y. - The Museum of the City of New York has an exciting line-up of public programs scheduled for November and December. November & DecemberTuesday • November 2 • 6:30 PM The Spirit of America and the Japanese Diaspora in New York City By the early years of the 20th century, New York City was home to a vibrant Japanese immigrant community. Merchants, writers, community activists, and others established organizations and social networks that continue to shape Japanese-American identity today. Panelists from organizations founded by these early pioneers will join historians and contemporary community activists in a discussion of New York's Japanese community then and now. Moderated by Carol Gluck, George Sansom Professor of History at Columbia University, the panel will include Daniel Inouyé, Visiting Assistant Professor of History, Queens College/CUNY; Suki Terada Ports, founder and Executive Director of the Family Health Project; and Gary Moriwaki, President of the Japanese American Association of New York. Co-sponsored by the Japanese American Association of New York and Japan Society. Presented in conjunction with Samurai in New York: The First Japanese Delegation, 1860. Reservations required. $6 Museum members, $12 non-members, $8 seniors and students.
  Wednesday • November 3 • 6:30 PM Japanese Design: The Art of the Everyday Object Japanese culture has been a powerful factor in the arts in New York ever since the arrival of the first Japanese ambassadors to New York in 1860. From the influence of Japanese prints on Impressionist painters and designers like Louis Comfort Tiffany to the impact of manga and anime on contemporary designers and artists, New Yorkers have been fascinated with Japanese design. Join design expert and author Phil Patton as he moderates a conversation featuring Chay Costello, Product Manager, MoMA Retail, and Adam Glickman, formerly of Tokion Magazine, about the progression, prevalence, and production of the familiar, everyday objects that were born from New York and Japan's enduring legacy of cultural design exchange. Presented in conjunction with Samurai in New York: The First Japanese Delegation, 1860. Reservations required. $6 Museum members, $12 non-members, $8 seniors and students. Sunday • November 7 • 2:00 PM The Rafael Hernandez and Sylvia Rexach Festival of Puerto Rican Composers This annual festival, presented in collaboration with the Association for Puerto Rican-Hispanic Culture in honor of the two famous Puerto Rican composers, will feature performances by Julito Cuevas and his Trio, Los Platinos, Carmen D. Lucca, and Julio Rosaly. Free with Museum admission. Tuesday • November 9 • 6:30 PM Spotlight on Design: The Taxi of Tomorrow Few objects are more recognizable as quintessentially New York than the yellow taxicab. Yet today's taxi fleet is composed of 16 different vehicles types, all of which are retrofitted to meet city regulations. The New York City Taxi and Limousine Commission "Taxi of Tomorrow Project" is an effort to identify a new vehicle through an international design competition. Join us as Commissioner David Yassky of the Taxi and Limousine Commission unveils some of the new designs and joins a panel discussion moderated by Deborah Marton, Executive Director, The Design Trust for Public Space, featuring Paul Herzan, Chairman, Board of Trustees, Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum, Smithsonian Institution; Louis Infante, Executive Director, Military & Government Markets, Ricardo Inc; Cliff Lloyd, independent taxicab owner; and Ronald Sherman, President of the Metropolitan Taxicab Board of Trade. This program is presented as part of the ongoing series The Urban Forum: Spotlight on Design. Co-sponsored by The Design Trust for Public Space. Reservations required. $6 Museum members, $12 non-members, $8 seniors and students. Saturday • November 13 • 1:00 PM Glorious Sky: Herbert Katzman's New York: Gallery Tour Join guest curator Julia Blaut for a tour of the museum's newest exhibition Glorious Sky: Herbert Katzman's New York, featuring nearly 90works-both paintings and works on paper-by Herbert Katzman (1923-2004). For this Chicago-born artist, New York's built environment became his primary subject and his enduring inspiration. The exhibition sheds light on an often overlooked side of the mid-century "New York School" through the work of one artist and his productive 50 year career. Free with Museum admission. Monday • November 15 • 6:00 PM Louis Auchincloss Prize Join us for the presentation of the fourth annual Louis Auchincloss Prize to novelist, essayist, and journalist Pete Hamill. Mr. Hamill has published nine novels and two collections of short stories. In his most recent novels, North River and Forever, he takes readers into the city that most captures his heart, memory, and imagination-New York. The Louis Auchincloss Prize is presented yearly to writers and artists whose work is inspired by and enhances the five boroughs of New York City. The prize honors Louis Auchincloss (1917 - 2010) for his many years of service to the Museum of the City of New York as well as for his literary contributions. Space is limited and reservations are required. Tickets at $25 can be purchased online at www.mcny.org or by phone at 917.492.3395. Tuesday • November 16 • 6:30 PM The Naked City The Gritty City: NYC Film Series Julia Blaut, guest curator of the exhibition Glorious Sky: Herbert Katzman's New York, hosts this screening of the film The Naked City. In 1947, The Naked City became the first feature film shot on location in New York in two decades. The city itself became a character in the film through a combination of aerial cinematography and street scenes, but it was the renewal of the film's love affair with the look and feel of Manhattan that made it a milestone in cinema history, one that would impact the broader field of the visual arts. Ms. Blaut's opening remarks will explore the film within this historic and artistic context. Presented in conjunction with Glorious Sky: Herbert Katzman's New York. Reservations required. $ 6 Museum members, $12 non-members, $8 seniors and students.
  Thursday • November • 18 • 6:00 PM Opening Symposium: Denys Wortman Rediscovered: Drawings for the World-Telegram and Sun, 1930-1953 The life, art, and times of Denys Wortman, who made daily cartoons for the World-Telegram and Sun for three decades, will be discussed by some of America's most distinguished cartoonists and historians, including Jules Feiffer, Pulitzer Prize- and Academy Award-winning cartoonist, playwright, and screenwriter; James Sturm, Eisner Award-winning cartoonist and Director of The Center for Cartoon Studies; Joshua Brown, Executive Director of the American Social History Project/Center for Media and 2010 John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellow; and Denys Wortman VIII, son of the artist. The panel will be moderated by Sean Corcoran, the Museum's Curator of Prints and Photographs. Exhibition opening reception to follow. Co-sponsored by The Center for Cartoon Studies and the Society of Illustrators, the event is presented in conjunction with the opening of Denys Wortman Rediscovered: Drawings for the World-Telegram and Sun, 1930-1953. Reservations required. $8 for seniors and students; $10 for Museum Members; $15 for nonmembers. Monday • November 29 • 6:30 PM Making New York State Government Great Again From persistent and prolonged budget delays to leadership coups and ethics violations, New York State's government is widely regarded as dysfunctional. New York City residents have born the costs-higher taxes, crowded classrooms, and member item boondoggles. What will it take to make New York State great again? Join moderator Henry J. Stern, founder and President of New York Civic, in conversation with Philip K. Howard, author of The Collapse of the Common Good (Ballantine Books, 2002); E.J. McMahon, Director of the Empire Center for New York State Policy at The Manhattan Institute for Policy Research; and William Samuels, founder of the New Roosevelt Initiative and former finance director for the New York State Senate Democrats, for a post-election discussion of how New York State can again become a national model. This program is co-sponsored by New York Civic and presented as part of the Museum's ongoing series The Urban Forum: Power & Politics, New York Style. Reservations required. $6 Museum members, $12 non-members, $8 seniors and students. Tuesday • November 30 • 6:30 PM Dancing in the Dark: The Everyman in Great Depression Arts and Culture A Conversation with Morris Dickstein Morris Dickstein, Distinguished Professor at the City University of New York, has been described by Norman Mailer as "one of our best and most distinguished critics of American literature." Join Prof. Dickstein for a discussion of his award-winning book Dancing in the Dark (WW Norton: 2010) and a conversation focusing on how Great Depression-era culture celebrated the "everyman"-from the music of Aaron Copland to the radio comedy "Amos ‘n' Andy" to the cartoons of Denys Wortman.  Prof. Dickstein will be joined by journalist and historian Robert W. Snyder, director of the Graduate Program in American Studies at Rutgers-Newark, and contributor to the new book Denys Wortman's New York. Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Denys Wortman Rediscovered. Reservations required. $6 Museum members, $12 non-members, $8 seniors and students. Tuesday • December 7 • 6:30 PM The New York City Subway Map - Form v. Function in the Public Realm Massimo Vignelli's 1972 New York City subway map, produced by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, was considered a design triumph-earning itself a place in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art-but it was also criticized as confusing to passengers. A new version of the subway map was released earlier this year, re-raising the enduring dilemma of how best to achieve both functionality and beauty. Join the creators of several subway maps, including John Tauranac and Massimo Vignelli, for a discussion about designing for the riding public, featuring Eddie Jabbour, creator of Kick Map and the NYC subway app; and Paul Shaw, author of Helvetica and the New York City Subway System: The True (Maybe) Story (110 Editions, 2009). Reservations required. $6 Museum members, $12 non-members, $8 seniors and students. Wednesday • December 8 • 6:30 PM Celebrating the City Symphony: New Work 3D Films Inspired by Manhatta Award-winning filmmakers Marylou Tibaldo-Bongiorno and Jerome Bongiorno have created New Work, two contemporary 3D short films capturing the City of Newark, NJ and the Brooklyn Waterfront. These city symphony films were inspired by the classic avant-garde short Manhatta (1921), which is celebrating its 90th anniversary next year. Join us for a screening of the New Work films in 3D and the digitally restored Manhatta. The New Work filmmakers and panel will discuss Newark, the Brooklyn Waterfront, and Manhatta's enduring legacy featuring Richard Hanley, Professor of English, New York City College of Technology/CUNY and Project Director of the NEH Landmarks workshop, Along the Shore: Changing and Preserving the Landmarks of Brooklyn's Industrial Waterfront; Beth Venn, Curator, Modern and Contemporary Art and Senior Curator, American Art, The Newark Museum, in a conversation moderated by Sean Corcoran, Curator of Prints and Photographs at the Museum of the City of New York. Co-sponsored by New York City College of Technology/CUNY and The Newark Museum. Support for this program is generously provided by a grant from the New York Council for the Humanities. Reservations required. $6 Museum members, $12 non-members, $8 seniors and students. Thursday • December 9 • 6:30 PM Encyclopedia of New York City Celebrate the release of the second edition of the award-winning Encyclopedia of New York City. The first edition of this monumental reference volume quickly became the gold standard for information about the city. Today, 15 years after its release, the Encyclopedia has been updated with most of its articles significantly revised and 800 new entries from Air-Train to E-Z Pass, from September 11 to public order. Join the book's editor Prof. Kenneth T. Jackson, Jacques Barzun Professor of History at Columbia University, for a discussion of the innovations in the new edition, followed by a reception to help launch the book. Reservations required. $6 Museum members, $12 non-members, $8 seniors and students. Saturday • December 11 • 1:00 PM Denys Wortman Rediscovered: Gallery Tour Join noted journalist and historian Robert W. Snyder and Sean Corcoran, Curator of Prints and Photographs, for a tour of the Museum's newest exhibition featuring original cartoon drawings depicting life in New York during the Great Depression, World War II, and post-war years. The tour will explore the artist's life and working methods while placing his imagery in the social and historical context of the city. Free with Museum admission.
  Thursday • December 16 • 6:30 PM The World of Gloria Vanderbilt Join author Wendy Goodman, design editor of New York magazine, for a discussion of her newest publication, The World of Gloria Vanderbilt (Abrams, 2010). Gloria Vanderbilt, who is featured in the Museum exhibition Notorious & Notable: Twentieth Century Women of Style, is an artist, author, designer, and entrepreneur. Wendy Goodman will discuss how Vanderbilt brought her family name out of the Gilded Age and into the Digital Age, reinventing herself over and over along the way. Reservations required. $6 Museum members, $12 non-members, $8 seniors and students. FAMILY PROGRAMS: Saturday • November 6 • 2:00 PM City Mosaics: Family Performance Bonga & The Vodou Drums of Haiti Explore how the rhythms of Haiti have enriched New York culture in this family concert. Bonga & the Vodou Drums of Haiti present traditional Afro-Haitian roots music in a raw and enchanting form. Featured are distinctive and colorful Haitian drums and percussion as well as instruments like the mbira (thumb piano), conch (spiral seashell), and didgeridoo (bamboo pipe horn). With an extensive repertoire of Afro-Haitian rhythms, kreyol songs, and regional dances, these sounds conjure images of Haiti's spirit, beauty, and way of life. Free with Museum admission. Saturday • December 4 • 2:00 PM Thank You Lena! A Musical Tribute by Jo Thomson Brooklyn-born Lena Horne got her start in show business singing jazz at the famed Cotton Club in 1933 and later touring the American and European nightclub circuits. An example of her impeccable style is currently featured in the Museum's exhibition Notorious & Notable: Twentieth Century Women of Style. Join Jo Thompson on piano and vocals for a musical tribute to Lena Horne, who befriended Ms. Thompson when both women were booked at Jack Goldman's Clover Club in Miami in 1953. Free with Museum admission. Saturday • December 11 • 2:00 PM City Stories: Family Workshop Meet Andrea Davis Pinkney Join award-winning Brooklyn-based author Andrea Davis Pinkney for a reading and interactive multimedia presentation featuring three of her publications: Alvin Ailey; Sit-In: How Four Friends Stood Up by Sitting Down; and the Caldecott Honor Book and Coretta Scott King Honor Book Duke Ellington: The Piano Prince and His Orchestra; book signing to follow. Recommended for ages 7 and up. Free with Museum admission. Saturday • December 18 • 2:00 PM Gallery Explorers: Family Workshop Draw Your Own City Cartoon In celebration of the exhibition Denys Wortman Rediscovered: Drawings for the World-Telegram and Sun, 1930-1953, cartoonist Sean Ford, M.F.A., The Center for Cartoon Studies, will lead a family workshop, introducing the basics of cartooning and storytelling through comic strips and single panel cartoons. The workshop is inspired by Wortman's daily single frame column entitled "Metropolitan Movies." Free with Museum admission, reservations requested. Please call 917.492.3395. Sunday • December 19 • 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM City Mosaics: Family ProgramPosadas y Pastorelas, 7th Annual Mexican Family Celebration Get into the holiday spirit a la Mexicana with an afternoon of crafts, music, and food. Highlights include a posada, the traditional singing procession, and a pastorela, the traditional shepherds' play. The event culminates in a party with piñatas and refreshments. Presented in partnership with Mano a Mano: Mexican Culture Without Borders. Free with Museum admission. ###