eastman-house.jpgRochester, N.Y. - No fooling, it's an eventful April at the George Eastman House! Civil War exhibitions, live music performances, and the 53rd Rochester International Film Festival only scratch the surface of all that's taking place here next month! PROGRAMS 1                    Friday, 8 p.m. FILM EVENT/ APRIL FOOL'S DAY DOUBLE FEATURE The late Leslie Nielson, who had a distinguished career as a leading man in the 1950s, also had one of the best deadpans in the business - a talent he put to great use in this night's classic pair of films from the ZAZ comedy team. The disaster movie satire Airplane! (US 1980, 87 min.) stars Nielson as Barry Rumack, a doctor on board a plane full of fish-poisoned passengers. In The Naked Gun(US 1988, 85 min.), Neilson's LAPD lieutenant Frank Drebin uncovers a heinous assassination plot masterminded by arch-criminal Vincent Ludwig (Ricardo Montalban). (The Leslie Nielson double feature will take place again at 4:30 p.m. Sunday, April 3.) 9          Saturday, 8 p.m. FILM EVENT/JONAS MEKAS HONORED A discussion with filmmaker and critic Jonas Mekas, widely considered to be the godfather of American avant-garde cinema, who will be presented with the title of George Eastman Honorary Scholar. Followed by a screening of his landmark diary film, Reminiscences of a Journey to Lithuania (US 1972, 88 min.), which is ultimately a home movie of uncommon gravity and impact: Mekas interweaves his sadness and yearning as an immigrant displaced by the tragedies of World War II with glimpses of the heritage stolen from him family and country by the Nazis filmed when he travels back to Europe decades later. Regular Dryden pricing: $8 general/$6 students and members. 10        Sunday, 2 p.m.             LECTURE Will Wilson's "Auto Immune Response" is a series of artworks that take as their subject the quixotic relationship between a post-apocalyptic Dine (Navajo) man and he devastatingly beautiful but toxic environment he inhabits. Wilson, an award-winning artist and photographer, is co-director of the Barrio Anita Community Mural Project in Tucson. His talk, the last in a series titled "Parallax Effects: Representations of Native Americans, Then and Now," will be followed by a Q&A. This event is made possible by the Humanities Project at the University of Rochester. Free to faculty and staff of the University of Rochester, Friends of Ganondagan, and Eastman House members. Talk is $6 or included with museum admission. Curtis Theatre. Sunday, 2 p.m. FILM EVENT/FILMS FOR FAMILIES At a time when family entertainment is dominated by spectacle and merchandising, it's nice to be reminded that there were (and are) smart children's films that can be enjoyed by viewers of any age. The Dryden Theatre announces a new addition to the film calendar: the family matinee. On the second Sunday of each month, we'll be screening a special family film at the kid-friendly time of 2 p.m. The series debuted in March and continues in April with A Little Princess (Alfonso Cuarón, US 1995, 97 min.), which is full of the wonder and magic of a classic Hollywood fantasy. Sent to the United States to attend boarding school after her father leaves for World War I, Sara Crewe pines for her home in India and wins friends by spinning fantastical tales. When her father disappears, however, the school's headmistress reduces Sara to a servant, challenging her faith in the power of fantasy. Admission: Adults $8 and $5 children (special child rate for matinees). Sunday, 3 to 4 p.m.             MUSICALE Allen Hopkins performs music from the Civil War era in the Living Room, as Eastman House presents Sunday afternoon musicales like George Eastman used to. Included with museum admission. 11-14   PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP Participants of "The Carbon Print: History & Technique" learn how to print and make carbon tissues from scratch using common materials and easy-to-make equipment. What sets Eastman House photography workshops apart is that participants not only learn and use the processes, but also they get to see prime examples of the processes from the museum's incomparable collection. For most of these workshops, no experience is necessary. These workshops are suitable for collectors, curators, photograph conservators, historians, artists, teachers and anyone interested in the history of photography. To learn more or register please call (585) 271-3361 ext. 323 or visit eastmanhouse.org. 17        Sunday, 3 p.m. FILM EVENT/EASTMAN HOUSE RESTORATION The spectacle of spectacles - The Ten Commandments (US 1923, 136 min.). Not only a great cast, but the great director of spectacles himself Cecil B. DeMille guides this great story he liked so much that he filmed it twice. DeMille's earliest epic production, this version, instead of being content with one story or one time period, starts with the Biblical Exodus story and moves to modern times (1923) with another story of good and evil, temptation and redemption, with a moral. This presentation is a restoration from George Eastman House, which used DeMille's personal nitrate print as its starting point and, using modern technology to restore the color sequences. Live piano by Philip C. Carli. Sunday, 3 to 4 p.m.             MUSICALE A performance featuring pianist and jazz singer Whitney Marchelle in the Living Room, as Eastman House presents Sunday afternoon musicales like George Eastman used to. Included with museum admission. 24        Sunday, 3 to 4 p.m.             MUSICALE Allen Hopkins performs music from the Civil War era in the Living Room, as Eastman House presents Sunday afternoon musicales like George Eastman used to. Included with museum admission.                 EXHIBITIONS You Ain't Heard Nothin' Yet:                                     Through April 17 Early Film and the Coming of Sound                         Brackett Clark Lobby Gallery Between the States: Photographs of the                      Through June 12, 2011 American Civil War from the                                      Brackett Clark Gallery George Eastman House Collection Still Here: Contemporary Artists                              Through June 12, 2011 and the Civil War                                                         South Gallery Reel Histories: The Civil War in                                Through June 12, 2011 Motion Pictures                                                            Potter Peristyle Larry Merrill: Looking at Trees                                   Through June 12, 2011                                                                                           Entrance Gallery Cameras from the                                                           Ongoing Technology Collection                                                    North Gallery The Remarkable George Eastman                                Ongoing                                                                                           East, West, and Discovery Galleries DRYDEN THEATRE FILM CALENDAR Please note: PRICE INCREASE! Dryden Theatre general admission tickets are $8 and George Eastman House members and student ticket rates are $6, unless otherwise noted. "Take-10" discount tickets (10 admissions for $60/$45 members and students) are available at the box office and the Museum Shop. Sunday films are screened at 7 p.m. unless otherwise noted. Films listed begin at 8 p.m. in the Dryden Theatre, except for Sunday evening films, which begin at 7 p.m., and those otherwise noted. The film program is partially funded by the National Endowment for the Arts and the New York State Council on the Arts. FEATURED FILM SERIES WALTER MATTHAU When Walter Matthau strode onstage to receive his Academy Award for The Fortune Cookie, he thanked the Academy for giving him the chance to "make a pretty good bit of money," then - pointing out the injuries he had incurred in a bicycle accident two days earlier - reproached his colleagues who hadn't bothered to show up. It was classic Matthau: a one-two punch of self-deprecation and sarcasm that showed his talent for the well-timed insult and the humility that gave the lie to his grouchy exterior. When thinking about Matthau, it's easy to focus on his curmudgeonly side, but to take a more detailed look at his career - as we continue our two-month series in April - is to discover not just a brilliant comic performer, but an actor of uncommon (and under-appreciated) depth and ability. Born into a working-class Jewish family on the Lower East Side in 1920, Matthau spent most of his childhood hustling for money after his father abandoned the family. In 1942, he enlisted in the Army Air Force, serving with none other than Jimmy Stewart. Back in New York and flush with money from the GI Bill, he promptly registered at the New School for Social Research's Dramatic Workshop, resurrecting the interest in acting he had developed as a child at summer camp. Working primarily in the theater throughout the 1950s, Matthau made gradual inroads into film as a foil to bigger stars. Although celebrated for his comedy, when given the opportunity to take on dramatic roles, Matthau always shone. For example, in Don Siegel's Charley Varrick (April 20), his body language subtly conveys a lifetime's worth of struggle and disappointment, As Billy Wilder once remarked, "Walter can play anything from Rhett Butler to Scarlett O'Hara." He might not have made it that far, but he did prove himself to be a master of every genre, sliding between farce, drama, romantic comedy, and action with the grace of a leading man. We hope you'll join us this spring as we pay him a long-overdue tribute. SPALDING GRAY The late monologist Spalding Gray was a complex person - a New England son of privilege who founded an experimental theater group, an extrovert who kept his private demons well hidden, and the star of a successful series of films that consisted of nothing but a man sitting at a desk. "My insides are not what my outsides are. I'm not who I appear to be," Gray once remarked, referring to his status as an outwardly uptight WASP who transformed his personal foibles into riveting, universal illustrations of the human condition. This April, we'll be presenting a brief tribute to Gray, with rare screenings of his performance films Monster in a Box (April 12) and Swimming to Cambodia (April 23 and 24), a glimpse of Gray's work as an actor in Steven Soderbergh's King of the Hill (April 19), and a weekend run of Soderbergh's moving documentary And Everything Is Going Fine (April 22 and 24), a 90-minute distillation of Gray's performances and interviews that gives him the opportunity to tell one last tale. FILMS FOR FAMILIES At a time when family entertainment is dominated by spectacle and merchandising, it's nice to be reminded that there were (and are) smart children's films that can be enjoyed by viewers of any age. With this in mind, the Dryden is proud to announce a new addition to our calendar: the family matinee. On the second Sunday of each month, we'll be screening a special family film at the kid-friendly time of 2 p.m. A Little Princess (April 10), a recent movie that has quickly become a modern classic, is this month's pick.  APRIL FILMS All films presented in 35mm, unless otherwise noted. 1 | FRIDAY | 8 p.m. | April Fools' Day | Leslie Nielsen Double Feature!  8 p.m. AIRPLANE! (Zucker, Abrahams & Zucker, US 1980, 87 min.)   9:45 p.m. THE NAKED GUN (David Zucker, US 1988, 85 min.)  The late Leslie Nielsen, who had a distinguished career as a leading man in the 1950s, also had one of the best deadpans in the business - a talent he put to great use in tonight's classic pair of films from the ZAZ comedy team. The disaster movie satire Airplane! stars Nielsen as Barry Rumack, a doctor on board a plane full of fish-poisoned passengers. In The Naked Gun, Nielsen's LAPD lieutenant Frank Drebin uncovers a heinous assassination plot masterminded by arch-criminal Vincent Ludwig (Ricardo Montalban). 2 | SATURDAY | 8 p.m. | New Cinema | Director's Cut ENTER THE VOID(Gaspar Noe, France 2009, 161 min.) An expat American living in Japan gets blasted into the beyond, but his spirit remains as a guardian to his troubled sister. A first-person POV head trip par excellence, Enter the Void seemingly violates the laws of physics as its camera glides and swoops through the strip clubs, back alleys, and love hotels of the Tokyo underworld. Running 140 minutes in its US release - the director simply removed an entire reel! - we will be presenting the original, uncut European version. No one under 18 admitted. 3 | SUNDAY | Leslie Nielsen Double Feature! 4:30 p.m. AIRPLANE! and 6:15 p.m. THE NAKED GUN See April 1. 4 | MONDAY | 1:30 p.m. | SENIOR MATINEE (free for those age 60 and over) MISTER ROBERTS (1955) 5 | TUESDAY | 8 p.m. | Rowland Brown | Nitrate Print! WHAT PRICE HOLLYWOOD? (George Cukor, US 1932, 88 min.) Brown Derby waitress Mary Evans (Constance Bennett) rises to the top of the heap thanks to the efforts of director Max Carey (real-life director Lowell Sherman), but as Mary's star rises, Max's alcoholism threatens to derail the careers of them both. Rowland Brown was but one of many contributors to this proto-A Star Is Born, a devastatingly cynical take on movieland mores directed with great verve by a young Cukor. 6 | WEDNESDAY | 8 p.m. | Masahiro Shinoda SAMURAI SPY (IBUN SARUTOBI SASUKE, Masahiro Shinoda, Japan 1965, 100 min.) After fourteen years of rule by the Tokugawa clan, trouble stirs when a spy for the shogunate threatens to defect to the opposition. Unwittingly drafted into the conflict, neutral samurai Sasuke Sarutobi sets out to find the defector, making his way through a maze of double agents, corrupt officials, and persecuted minorities. Shinoda's revisionist samurai film takes a page from film noir, with shadowy visuals and a complex plot that explicitly parallels the Cold War crisis. 7 | THURSDAY | 8 p.m. | Walter Matthau THE TAKING OF PELHAM 1-2-3 (Joseph Sargent, US 1974, 104 min.) As if the entire New York subway system and a group of visiting Japanese dignitaries weren't enough to juggle before lunch, transit cop Walter Matthau learns that a group of crooks led by Robert Shaw has hijacked a No. 6 train, threatening to kill passengers if they don't receive a $1 million in one hour. Matthau's serious wisecracks mesh beautifully with the fantastic action set pieces and the sense of resilience and scrappy community in the face of New York's pervasive cruddiness. A Dryden favorite, this relentlessly efficient and satirical thriller is among the best of the '70s. 8 | FRIDAY | 8 p.m. | Jonas Mekas FILMS FROM THE NEW AMERICAN CINEMA (Various, approx. 90 min.) This sampling of films championed by Jonas Mekas reveals the diversity of his interests, the expanse of his sensibility, and the shadow of his influence. Works to be screened include The Climate of New York (Rudy Burckhardt), Reflections on Black (Stan Brakhage), Overstimulated (Jack Smith), Unsere afrikareise (Peter Kubelka), Arabesque for Kenneth Anger (Marie Menken), Straight and Narrow (Tony and Beverly Conrad), The Canaries (Jerome Hill), and Fuji (Robert Breer). See series notes for full description. 9 | SATURDAY | 8 p.m. | Jonas Mekas in Person! REMINISCENCES OF A JOURNEY TO LITHUANIA (Jonas Mekas, US 1972, 88 min., 16mm) Jonas Mekas opens this landmark diary film with footage shot after his arrival in Brooklyn footage, displaying all the sadness and yearnings of the displaced. He then returns to Lithuania for the first time in 25 years, and uses his camera to document every last bit of life and heritage stolen from his family and his country by the Nazis. Finally, Mekas travels to Vienna and basks in friendship and love. The result is a "home movie" of uncommon gravity and impact. Inducted into the National Film Registry in 2006. 10 | SUNDAY | 2 p.m. | Family Matinee A LITTLE PRINCESS (Alfonso Cuarón, US 1995, 97 min.) Sent to the United States to attend boarding school after her father leaves for World War I, Sara Crewe pines for her home in India and wins friends by spinning fantastical tales. When her father disappears, however, the school's headmistress reduces Sara to a servant, challenging her faith in the power of fantasy. Full of the wonder and magic of a classic Hollywood fantasy, A Little Princess has become one of the most beloved family films of recent years. 11 | MONDAY | 1:30 p.m. | SENIOR MATINEE (free for those age 60 and over) THERE'S NO BUSINESS LIKE SHOW BUSINESS (1954) 12 | TUESDAY | 8 p.m. | Spalding Gray MONSTER IN A BOX (Nick Broomfield, UK/US 1992, 87 min.) Gray's second filmed monologue focuses on his attempts to finish an autobiographical novel, and the sense of procrastination that leads him to play the stage manager in Our Town, go on a fact-finding mission to Nicaragua, attend the Moscow Film Festival, and spend time with a group of alien abductees, among other diversions. A self-consciously digressive meditation on the joys of finishing tomorrow, Monster makes clear Gray's ability to turn everyday anecdotes into enthralling entertainment. 13 | WEDNESDAY | 8 p.m. | Walter Matthau | Members' Movie Night HOUSE CALLS (Howard Zieff, US 1978, 98 min.) New widower Dr. Charley Nichols (Walter Matthau) is surprised at how easy it is to play the field, but is even more surprised when he begins falling for Ann Atkinson (Glenda Jackson), a smart and outspoken woman who wants something more than a one-night stand. A wonderful romantic comedy from the pen of Julius Epstein (Casablanca!), House Calls harkens back to the glory days of screwball with its wit, maturity, and the surprisingly perfect pairing of Jackson and Matthau. Members admitted free. 14 | THURSDAY | 8 p.m. | The 53rd Rochester International Film Festival Produced by Movies on a Shoestring since 1959, RIFF is the longest continuously held short film festival. Each screening will feature seven short films, including narratives, animated work, and/or documentaries. Award-winning filmmakers from all parts of the world will be in attendance to introduce and discuss their work. Admission is free, but donations are gratefully accepted. For film listings, visit rochesterfilmfest.org. Special appearance by Jim Lindner, archival inventor and CEO of Mass Media, LLC, at tonight's screening. 15 | FRIDAY | 8 p.m. | The 53rd Rochester International Film Festival 16 | SATURDAY 4 p.m. | The 53rd Rochester International Film Festival 8 p.m. | The 53rd Rochester International Film Festival 17 | SUNDAY 3 p.m. | Silent Cinema THE TEN COMMANDMENTS (DeMille, US 1923, 136 min.)  The spectacle of spectacles. Not only a great cast, but the great director of spectacles himself Cecil B. DeMille guides this great story he liked so much that he filmed it twice. DeMille's earliest epic production, this version, instead of being content with one story or one time period, starts with the Biblical Exodus story and moves to modern times (1923) with another story of good and evil, temptation and redemption, with a moral. This presentation is a restoration from George Eastman House, which used DeMille's personal nitrate print as its starting point and, using modern technology, created a new negative and prints replicating the look of DeMille's nitrate, including sequences in his favorite early color system, The Handschiegl Color Process. Live piano by Philip C. Carli. 17 | SUNDAY 7 p.m. | Walter Matthau GRUMPY OLD MEN (Donald Petrie, US 1993, 103 min.) Crusty retirees John Gustafson (Jack Lemmon) and Max Goldman (Walter Matthau) live out their twilight years in snowbound Wabasha, MN, greeting the day by insulting each other from their front porches and staking out separate ice fishing spots. With the arrival of new neighbor Ann-Margret, their decades-long feud comes to a boil, as the two men increasingly vie for her affections. An unexpected holiday hit, Grumpy Old Men revitalized the shared career of Lemmon and Matthau, who proved their chemistry hadn't faded a bit. 18 | MONDAY | 1:30 p.m. | SENIOR MATINEE (free for those age 60 and over) THE GANG'S ALL HERE (1943) 19 | TUESDAY | 8 p.m. | Spalding Gray KING OF THE HILL (Steven Soderbergh, US 1993, 99 min.) Growing up in Missouri during the Great Depression, Aaron Kurlander (Jesse Bradford) is left to fend for himself after his family is driven apart by poverty. Living in a decrepit hotel, Aaron fends off creditors, cops, and an eviction-happy bellboy amidst a small circle of fellow outcasts. Soderbergh's unjustly neglected adaption of A.E. Hotchner's memoir is quietly magical, boasting wonderful supporting performances by Adrien Brody, Lauryn Hill, and Spalding Gray as the mysterious "Mr. Mungo." 20 | WEDNESDAY | 8 p.m. | Walter Matthau CHARLEY VARRICK (Don Siegel, US 1973, 111 min.) Walter Matthau plays the eponymous Charley, "The Last of the Independents," a destitute crop-duster who's slipped into a life of small-time crime. After a bank robbery turns fatal, Matthau finds himself with a suspiciously large take and hit man Joe Don Baker on his tail in a chase across a forlorn American countryside. Alternatively solemn and fox-clever, this unassuming thriller finds director Siegel working at his 1970s peak, dispensing violence with steely professionalism. 21 | THURSDAY | 8 p.m. | Walter Matthau THE BAD NEWS BEARS (Michael Ritchie, US 1976, 102 min.) Alcoholic ex-minor leaguer Morris Buttermaker (Walter Matthau) is hired to coach a Little League team full of misfits so uncoordinated they forfeit their first game 26-0. Pulling in two ringers - a tomboy pitcher (Tatum O'Neal) and a bad boy centerfielder (Jackie Earle Haley) - Buttermaker is able to get the team into shape, but the drive to win soon pushes him to outrageous extremes. Matthau is at his hangdog best in this joyfully vulgar '70s classic from the underrated Michael Ritchie. 22 | FRIDAY | 8 p.m. | Spalding Gray | New Cinema AND EVERYTHING IS GOING FINE (Steven Soderbergh, US 2010, 89 min.) Faced with the task of telling the life story of a master storyteller, Steven Soderbergh takes a typically ingenious tack: he lets his subject speak for himself. Through meticulous editing, the director compiles excerpts from Gray's many stage shows, interviews, and home movies into one extended, posthumous autobiography. As we watch Gray present his life through performance, Soderbergh's careful montage provides further insight, creating a revelatory portrait of an artist defined by self-revelation. 23 | SATURDAY |  8 p.m. | Spalding Gray SWIMMING TO CAMBODIA (Jonathan Demme, US 1987, 87 min.) Sitting behind a small desk, Gray talks about his time in Thailand during the making of The Killing Fields, in which he played a diplomatic aide. Focusing on his status as an American abroad, Gray weaves discussions of personal experience, foreign policy, and Cambodian history into a remarkable, commanding monologue. Directed by the modern master of the performance film, Jonathan Demme, Swimming to Cambodia conjures up a few dozen films' worth of images with just one actor and an almost-bare stage. 24 | SUNDAY 4 p.m. AND EVERYTHING IS GOING FINE See April 22. 7 p.m. SWIMMING TO CAMBODIA See April 23. 25 | MONDAY | 1:30 p.m. | SENIOR MATINEE (free for those age 60 and over) THE GREAT LIE (1941) April 27-May 2 360 | 365 George Eastman House Film Festival Join us for six days of film celebration at the 360 | 365 George Eastman House Film Festival, April 27-May 2 at the Dryden and Little Theatres.  Although this is the second collaboration between George Eastman House and the former High Falls Film Festival, it marks the 10th anniversary of Rochester's largest annual film festival. The festivities will include local premieres of new narrative features, documentaries, shorts, recently restored films, as well as experimental works from around the world, fascinating panel discussions, in-person visits from filmmakers, award ceremonies, and several not-to-miss receptions.  Tickets and passes: www.film360365.com/festival/tickets-and-passes.

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George Eastman House combines the world's leading museum of photography and film with the house, gardens, and estate of Kodak founder George Eastman, the father of popular photography and motion picture film. Address:          900 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14607-2298 Web site:         www.eastmanhouse.org  Phone:             (585) 271-3361 Hours: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday; until 8 p.m. Thursday; 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday (closed Mondays) Museum Tours: 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday Museum Admission:   $12 for adults; $10 for senior citizens (65 and older); $5 for students; and free for children 12 and under and museum members. Dryden Admission: $8 for the general public, $6 for students and museum members. Media Contact: Dresden Engle, Public Relations Manager dengle@geh.org 271-3361 ext. 213 ATTN. MEDIA: High-res images for exhibitions and Dryden screenings can be found online at https://secure.eastmanhouse.org/pressroom