hollywood2go1.jpgExperience behind-the-scenes look at the studio process, led by movie execs Rochester, N.Y. - As part of its exciting roster of September events, the George Eastman House is hosting a two-day seminar titled Hollywood2Go, which presents filmmakers and movie-lovers an opportunity to get a behind-the-scenes look at the studio process of motion picture development, production, and marketing. Hollywood2Go, which is led by Hollywood insiders, will take place Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 24 and 25. Participants will learn over two days the path of a film from beginning (the pitch) to the end (distribution), as well as the history and structure of today's movie studios; how to protect your intellectual property; how talent deals are negotiated; the shifting balance of power in Hollywood; and film economics. "It's like earning a two-day MBA in film," said founder and presenter Robert Rubin, a graduate of the University of Rochester who has been in the entertainment industry for more than 20 years as an entertainment attorney, dealmaker, studio executive, and home entertainment executive. Hollywood2Go co-presenter Jeffrey Korchek has served as a senior executive at USA Entertainment®, a literary agent, and executive vice president in charge of business and legal affairs at Universal Pictures®. Rubin and Korchek also have taught the course "The Business of Film" at UCLA Extension.   Korchek is Adjunct Professor of the USC School of Cinema's Peter Stark Program, teaching the first year business course for graduate students. Cost for the two-day seminar is $550 ($500 for Eastman House members and $450 students and faculty). For information, visit www.hollywood2go.com; call (585) 271 3361 ext. 222; or email at information@hollywood2go.com. All proceeds from Hollywood2go support George Eastman House. George Eastman House September 2011 Calendar of Events 4          Sunday, 3 to 4 p.m.             MUSICALE Joe Blackburn performs "From Classics to the Fox Trot" on George Eastman's Aeolian pipe organ in the Conservatory, as Eastman House presents Sunday afternoon musicales like George Eastman used to. Included with museum admission. 8          Thursday, 8 p.m. FILM EVENT: Dryden at 60 Years/"Beyond Mickey" As part of the year-long celebration of the Dryden's 60th anniversary, the Dryden Theatre presents a series of programs and special screenings highlighting the legacy of the Eastman House's first motion picture curator and 26-year film programmer, James Card. Throughout Card's tenure he worked to build the museum's motion picture collection from his personal film holdings and from the collection of Eastman Kodak Company's Research Laboratory. Screening from this collection, Card helped to establish the Dryden, which was built through the generosity of George Eastman's niece Ellen Dryden and her husband, George, in honor of Eastman's contribution to motion pictures. Tonight's program is titled "Before Mickey," a salute to early film animation featuring rare treasures that pre-date Disney's iconic mouse. The line-up features "Eight Shorts from the Pioneers of Animation" -- two classic examples of line drawing animation A RAMBLE ON SKATES WITH INKY DINK (ca. 1916) and THE BOTTOM OF THE SEA (1914); two shorts featuring the braggart thought to be based on Theodore Roosevelt, COLONEL HEEZA LIAR ON THE JUMP (1917) and COLONEL HEEZA LIAR NATURALIST (1914).; two from the greatest names in animation, Walt Disney's Alice 's Spanish Guitar (1926) and Georges Méliès's LES FROMAGE AUTOMOBILES (1913). And we'll be treated to two from the cell animation-pioneer Bray Studios featuring a mischievous boy who was modeled on R. F. Outcault's Buster Brown; BOBBY BUMPS AT THE DENTIST (1917) and BOBBY BUMPS' DISAPPEARING GUN (1918). Features live piano accompaniment by Philip C. Carli. Regular Dryden admission: $8 general/$6 students. 8          Thursday, 6 p.m. PHOTOGRAPHY LECTURE: Robert Farber Farber's lecture will take us through the evolution of a nontraditional career path, from the days when he sold his photography on the street, to a career in both fashion/beauty and fine art photography. His photographic books, including By the Sea edited by Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, have sold more than a half million copies. Presented in conjunction with Artisan Works. Included with museum admission (free to Eastman House and Artisan Works members. Dryden Theatre. 10        Saturday, 10 a.m.             GARDEN EVENT: Plant Sale Add some Rochester history to your garden with perennials and woody plants grown from seeds, divisions, cuttings, and offshoots from the Eastman House gardens. Free admission. Location: Near the Rock Garden off University Avenue.    11        Sunday, 3 to 4 p.m.             MUSICALE Joe Fitzgerald performs classical guitar in the Conservatory, as Eastman House presents Sunday afternoon musicales like George Eastman used to. Included with museum admission. 11        Sunday, 4 p.m. Remembering 9/11 and Moving Forward Together: The Joining of Many   Faiths, Many Perspectives. The 10th anniversary of the September 11th terrorist attacks will be recognized with a gathering on the East Vista side lawn of George Eastman, hosted by a multi-faith team. Music, poetry, readings, and prayers for all people will be included. Those attendees are welcome to bring a lawn chair. 12-15   Monday-Thursday PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP Participants of "Tracing The Light: Imagery Before Photography" will use their own camera, a tent camera obscura, and camera lucida to make drawings in the gardens at George Eastman House. Within the museum, create shades of other participants and reduce those images with a pantograph to make both hollow-cut and bronzed silhouettes. Rare drawings, silhouettes, and cameras obscura from the George Eastman House vaults will be displayed for inspection and discussion. Profiles will also be made with an 1810-style physionotrace apparatus. Participants will learn how to make a 19th-century style portable camera obscura and ribbon-tied folios. Workshops include sessions viewing examples of photographic processes held in the museum's collections. For more information about these one-of-a-kind workshops, visit eastmanhouse.org or call (585) 271-3361 ext. 323. 17        Saturday, 6 p.m. SPECIAL EVENT: Prohibition Party Step back in time to 1931 ... and enjoy an evening in the style of George Eastman. Prohibition cocktails and a period-style dinner (refined for today's palates) served in the mansion will be followed by a special performance by Rochester-born and nationally known singer Justin Hayford, who has embraced the music of such composers as Cole Porter and Frank Loesser. Hayford will sing tunes from the Great American Songbook popular in 1931, like "I Got Rythym" and "Dream a Little Dream." Tickets: $250 per person for this unique evening celebrating George Eastman House. Limited to 80 attendees. For reservations contact Kate Herrmann at (585) 271-3361 ext. 291. 18        Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. SPECIAL EVENT: 2011 George Eastman House Benefit Auction Preview A sneak-peek at a selection of items featured in the George Eastman House Benefit Auction 2011, taking place via an online auction in New York City Oct. 3 as well as an online portion (Sept. 26-Oct. 7 at iGavelAuctions.com). Hear the stories behind the objects, learn about their provenance, and get the inside scoop on your own personal collections (small or large, new or old). Curtis Theatre. Included with museum admission. 18        Sunday EXHIBITIONS CLOSING The final day to experience Norman Rockwell: Behind the Camera, Rockwell's photographic references paired with his artwork reveal the evolution of his iconic style. Organized by the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge, MA. Sponsored by M&T Bank, with additional support provided by The Robert Lehman Foundation. Also closing today is Americana: Hollywood and The American Way of Life, which is more than 150 images selected from the Eastman House collections create a projected montage reflecting on life's swiftly passing moments. Rockwell exhibition is $3 surcharge on regular museum admission. Americana included with museum admission. 18        Sunday, 3 to 4 p.m.             MUSICALE A performance in the Living Room with Argos Trio and Liana Koteva Kirvan on violin, Lars Kirvan on cello, and Chiao-Wen Cheng on piano, as Eastman House presents Sunday afternoon musicales like George Eastman used to. Included with museum admission. 24-25     Saturday and Sunday FILM SEMINAR Learn how the studio system really works. You'll never look at movies the same again! This two-day course offers an introduction to the studio process of motion picture development, production and marketing. Those involved with filmmaking or motion picture marketing will come away with a better understanding of how they work, and those with a general interest in the business of motion pictures will come away as more educated moviegoers. The seminar consists of seven 70-minute sessions immediately followed by 20 minutes of questions covering the various topics, and is led by two Hollywood insiders - Bob Rubin, who has been in the entertainment industry for more than 20 years as an entertainment attorney, dealmaker, studio executive, and home entertainment executive; and Jeffrey Korchek, who was previously senior executive with both USA Entertainment® and Universal Pictures® and is now with Mattel®. Two-day intensive course: $550 ($500 for Eastman House members and $450 students and faculty. For information, visit www.hollywood2go.com; call (585) 271 3361 ext. 222; or email at information@hollywood2go.com. 25        Sunday, 3 to 4 p.m.             MUSICALE A performance in the Living Room with Gordon Porth performing solo classical piano on George Eastman's Steinway, as Eastman House presents Sunday afternoon musicales like George Eastman used to. Included with museum admission.  GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE EXHIBITIONS September 2011 Norman Rockwell:                                                     Through September 18, 2011 Behind the Camera                                                    Brackett Clark and South Galleries Americana: Hollywood and                                       Through September 18, 2011 The American Way of Life                                        Brackett Clark Annex Gallery Cameras from the                                                      Ongoing Technology Collection                                               North Gallery The Remarkable George Eastman                           Ongoing                                                                                     East, West, and Discovery Galleries Kodak Today                                                             Ongoing                                                                                     Second floor of mansion DRYDEN THEATRE FILM CALENDAR September 2011 FEATURED FILM SERIES Dryden At 60 As part of our year-long celebration of the Dryden's 60th anniversary, we present a series of programs and special screenings highlighting the legacy of the Museum's first motion picture curator and 26-year film programmer, James Card. Throughout Card's tenure, he worked to build the Museum's motion picture collection from his personal film holdings and from the collection of Eastman Kodak Company's Research Laboratory. Screening from this collection, Card helped to establish the Dryden, which was built through the generosity of George Eastman's niece Ellen Dryden and her husband George, as a mecca for film enthusiasts, cinephiles, researchers, and film historians. In October, the 2011 James Card Memorial Lecture will feature Nana, the first film shown on the Dryden screen in 1951 and a personal favorite of Card's. Happy 100th, Vincent Price Why is it that movie stars who spend most of their careers trying to scare us inevitably inspire more devotion than their crowd-pleasing counterparts? Lon Chaney, Boris Karloff, Christopher Lee, Barbara Steele - icons all, each with his or her own rabid following of fans and admirers. No actor who found a home in horror, however, has been the subject of as much admiration as the late, great Vincent Price, one of the most treasured and recognizable actors of all. Price would have turned 100 this year, and to celebrate his centennial, we'll be screening seven of his greatest movies, with an emphasis on the Halloween-appropriate films that brought him his greatest fame. What made Price such a memorable and beloved figure? If you've ever seen him gleefully list the names of Satan in Masque of the Red Death or simulate an acid trip in The Tingler, the answer is clear: his obvious and apparent love for his craft. Price enjoyed his work, and this always came through on screen, no matter how prestigious the picture or how low the budget. Off-screen, Price was a terrific talk-show wit, a celebrity chef and cookbook author, and a noted art collector and humanitarian who was always generous with his fans. In other words, he was a great guy who played bad guys well. Talented, funny, scary, and kind, Vincent Price was one of the great movie stars, and we hope you'll join us in our "Vincentennial" celebration. Halloween 2011: Truly Terrifying (& Funny, Too) In addition to our Vincent Price series, we'll be celebrating the scariest holiday of them all with a selection of horror films guaranteed to shock you out of your seat, as well as a pair of comic gems that put a unique twist on the genre. ImageOut Now in its 19th year, the Rochester Lesbian and Gay Film and Video Festival has established itself as a cultural force in the international film festival circuit. Each year, ImageOut features a growing number of regional, state, national, and international premier and award-winning films. In addition to each year's fabulous selection of the best cutting-edge film from around the globe, the October festival also features a spectacular festival experience with gala events, a star-studded guest list, and, of course, the annual Flower City Flicks competition, which invests in developing and showcasing Rochester's amazing local filmmaking talent. One of the longest running LGBT film festivals in the world, ImageOut began in 1993 with a modest 18 programs. With the dedication of an army of volunteers and generous support of the local LGBT and film-loving community, the festival has steadily grown in scope and breadth. ImageOut has matured into a year-round organization featuring events and screenings of festival favorites and brand new films at local theater venues and during such regional LGBT-related events as Rochester Pride Week, NY LGBT Health Month, and the Gay Alliance of the Genesee Valley's Youth Center. Please join us on Tuesday, October 11, for an "ImageOut of the Archives" screening as we celebrate the 10th anniversary of Hedwig and the Angry Inch. John Cameron Mitchell's now classic rock 'n' roll drag extravaganza cheekily speaks to issues of identity, immigration, sexual orientation, gender identity, and the uncertainty of love and relationships through the eyes and songs of its title character. The 19th annual festival will also screen full days of entertainment at the Dryden Theatre on October 8, 9, and 15. Visit www.imageout.org for more information and for a full listing of films. LABOR The 22nd annual Labor Film Series is a collaboration sustained since 1989 between George Eastman House and the Rochester Labor Council. On Fridays throughout September and October, we'll once again offer a selection of films with a global reach that deal with significant issues relating to work and workers. This year's program is diverse in tone and subject, ranging from dramas to comedies to up-to-the-minute documentaries that cover the worlds of retail, farming, sales, service, and more. In today's climate, when job stability and economic security are more precarious than ever - a fact the mainstream media seem to have forgotten in recent months - perhaps these films can both entertain and serve as a reminder of what we've lost, what we've gained, and what we still need to fight for. Silent Tuesdays This fall the George Eastman House will present weekly screenings of silent films from its extensive collections -comedy, romance, thrillers, Western, horror, and surprises from all over the world. Many of these films have not been seen publicly in decades, and there will be some recent restorations from our own Motion Picture Department. We look forward to your joining us on Tuesdays for the wonders of pantomime and pure visual storytelling - all with live musical accompaniment. The Weird World Of Bill Plympton Animation has always been popular at the Dryden, and to kick off our fall season, we're very happy to have the legendary cartoonist and animator Bill Plympton as our special guest. One of the field's most creative and honored artists, Plympton will be with us on October 1 for our screening of his latest film, Idiots and Angels.Plympton began his career in the 1970s as a cartoonist for publications like National Lampoon and the Soho Weekly News, and after some unreleased experiments and a commissioned work, he broke into animation in a big way with the short Your Face (1987). Nominated for an Academy Award®, the short immediately established the Plympton style: comic, surreal, jittery, and textured, with the distinctive colored pencil work that would become his trademark. Since then, Plympton has produced a remarkable amount of animated films, ranging from short comic pieces to full-blown features, always hand-drawn by their director no matter their frame count.In addition to a selection of Plympton's shorts and features, we'll also be screening a program of animation by Tex Avery and Bob Clampett - two of Plympton's major influences - as well as an evening of vintage silent animation from the Eastman House archives.Special thanks to the School of Film and Animation at the Rochester Institute of Technology for helping make this show possible. September Films Thursday, Sept. 1, 8 p.m. The Weird World Of Bill Plympton Tex Avery And Bob Clampett Cartoons! (US 1937-1946, program approx. 80 min., 35mm and 16mm) Tex Avery and Robert Clampett worked in tandem at Termite Terrace, the ramshackle animation studio responsible for the anarchic and rude thrills of Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies. These seven-minute wonders - jam-packed with gags, cultural irreverence, and alchemical fury - have inspired generations of kids and animators alike, not least Bill Plympton. Program highlights include the first Bugs Bunny cartoon, A Wild Hare; exemplary genre parody The Great Piggy Bank Robbery; and two of Avery's outrageous post-Looney endeavors, Swing Shift Cinderella and Red Hot Riding Hood in Technicolor prints. Friday, Sept. 2, 8 p.m. LABOR The Shop Around The Corner (Ernst Lubtisch, US 1940, 99 min.) James Stewart wants a cultured pen pal as a cheap alternative to an encyclopedia, and Margaret Sullavan wants a correspondent with an intellect higher than a broken cigarette lighter. They definitely don't want each other, since they fight every day as clerks at Frank Morgan's Budapest leather goods shop over the proper sales pitch for a musical candy box. Unbeknownst to one another, they are, in fact, lovers-by-mail. In this gentle and effortless comedy, Lubitsch teaches us about recognizing solidarity in romance and in the workplace. Saturday, Sept. 3, 8 p.m. ImageOut/ Rochester Premiere World On A Wire (WELT AM DRAHT, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, West Germany 1973, 212 min. in two parts with intermission) "There are movies that make news and movies that are news," wrote the Village Voice's J. Hoberman on the new restoration of Rainer Werner Fassbinder's sci-fi epic. World on A Wire is indeed newsworthy. An astonishing cinematic rediscovery, Fassbinder's existential exploration of virtual reality predates The Matrix by decades. A classic piece of '70s sci-fi, World On A Wire tells the tale of Fred Stiller (Klaus Lowitsch), a scientist at a cybernetics institute assigned to the Simulacron project, an online universe that can be plugged into and reprogrammed by its users. As his colleagues disappear and yesterday's papers get rewritten, however, Stiller begins to suspect that his own reality is being manipulated - but by whom? Produced for German TV and lost for decades, these screenings will be from the Fassbinder Foundation's newly restored 35mm print, so don't miss your chance to see this film on the big screen. Sunday, Sept. 4, 2 p.m. ImageOut/ Rochester Premiere World On A Wire (WELT AM DRAHT, Rainer Werner Fassbinder, West Germany 1973, 212 min. in two parts with intermission) "There are movies that make news and movies that are news," wrote the Village Voice's J. Hoberman on the new restoration of Rainer Werner Fassbinder's sci-fi epic. World on A Wire is indeed newsworthy. An astonishing cinematic rediscovery, Fassbinder's existential exploration of virtual reality predates The Matrix by decades. A classic piece of '70s sci-fi, World On A Wire tells the tale of Fred Stiller (Klaus Lowitsch), a scientist at a cybernetics institute assigned to the Simulacron project, an online universe that can be plugged into and reprogrammed by its users. As his colleagues disappear and yesterday's papers get rewritten, however, Stiller begins to suspect that his own reality is being manipulated - but by whom? Produced for German TV and lost for decades, these screenings will be from the Fassbinder Foundation's newly restored 35mm print, so don't miss your chance to see this film on the big screen. Sunday, Sept. 4, 7 p.m. LABOR The Shop Around The Corner (Ernst Lubtisch, US 1940, 99 min.) James Stewart wants a cultured pen pal as a cheap alternative to an encyclopedia, and Margaret Sullavan wants a correspondent with an intellect higher than a broken cigarette lighter. They definitely don't want each other, since they fight every day as clerks at Frank Morgan's Budapest leather goods shop over the proper sales pitch for a musical candy box. Unbeknownst to one another, they are, in fact, lovers-by-mail. In this gentle and effortless comedy, Lubitsch teaches us about recognizing solidarity in romance and in the workplace. Tuesday, Sept. 6, 8 p.m.(members only?) Silent Tuesdays The Penalty (Wallace Worsley, US 1920, 70 min.) and One Week (Buster Keaton and Eddie Cline, US 1920, 20 min.) These films represent a typical evening out at the movies in 1920, when Ameri- can films really began to take over the world and when a show would typically have two or more contrasting films for a night's entertainment. Lon Chaney stars as a maniacal San Francisco crime boss who seeks revenge on the doctor who mistakenly amputated his legs in The Penalty, and Buster Keaton stars as a man whose build-it-yourself house apparently seeks revenge on him in the hilarious short One Week. Live piano accompaniment by Philip C. Carli. Wednesday, Sept. 7, 8 p.m. Happy 100th, Vincent Price Masque Of The Red Death (Roger Corman, US/UK 1964, 89 min.) As the plague sweeps across medieval Europe, Prince Prospero (Vincent Price) hides in his castle, entertaining the wealthy, torturing peasants, and making preparations for a masked ball. The shadow of the Red Death is never far behind, though, and Prospero soon finds himself in a hell of his own making. Shot in Britain and lensed by future director Nicholas Roeg, Masque of Red Death is one of Roger Corman's supreme achievements, boasting a wonderfully debauched performance by Price. Print courtesy of the Joe Dante and Jon Davison Collection at the Academy Film Archive. Thursday, Sept. 8, 8 p.m. The Weird World of Bill Plympton Before Mickey: Eight Shorts from the Pioneers of Animation As part of the Dryden at 60 series, Before Mickey is a salute to early film animation featuring rare treasures that pre-date Disney's iconic mouse. The evening's line up of shorts includes two classic examples of line drawing animation A Ramble On Skates With Inky Dink (ca. 1916) and The Bottom Of The Sea (1914). Also included will be the treat of two shorts featuring the braggart thought to be based on Theodore Roosevelt, Colonel Heeza Liar On The Jump (1917) and Colonel Heeza Liar Naturalist (1914). Two from the greatest names in animation will also be included: Walt Disney's Alice's Spanish Guitar (1926) and Georges Méliès's Les Fromage Automobiles (1913). And we'll be treated to two from the cel animation-pioneer Bray Studios featuring a mischievous boy who was modeled on R. F. Outcault's Buster Brown: Bobby Bumps At The Dentist (1917) and Bobby Bumps' Disappearing Gun (1918). Friday, Sept. 9, 8 p.m. LABOR The Gleaners And I (Agnès Varda, France 2000, 82 min., French with subtitles) In France, even the scavengers have rights, we learn in Varda's multi-faceted and exuberant essay-documentary. Talking with everyone from provincial vagrants and aged jurists to bohemian collagists and amateur vintners, Varda contemplates the roots and causes of modern-day gleaning as the raw materials of a rich social panorama. Armed with a digital camera and boundless curiosity, Varda proves the biggest gleaner of them all. Saturday, Sept. 10, 8 p.m. Halloween 2011: Truly Terrifying (& Funny, Too) Shaun Of The Dead (Edgar Wright, UK 2004, 99 min.) Horror and comedy rarely mix, but somehow director Wright and co-writer/star Simon Pegg got the balance exactly right. This smart, funny, and downright scary take on the zombie flick successfully juggles laughs, screams, and - believe it or not - romance with the kind of perfectly disgusting gross-out effects any true fan of the genre should rightfully expect. Pegg stars as a lovelorn English salesman who slowly realizes those blokes stumbling about his neighborhood aren't drunk but rather dead. Sunday, Sept. 11, 7 p.m. The Weird World Of Bill Plympton Tex Avery And Bob Clampett Cartoons! (US 1937-1946, program approx. 80 min., 35mm and 16mm) Tex Avery and Robert Clampett worked in tandem at Termite Terrace, the ramshackle animation studio responsible for the anarchic and rude thrills of Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies. These seven-minute wonders - jam-packed with gags, cultural irreverence, and alchemical fury - have inspired generations of kids and animators alike, not least Bill Plympton. Program highlights include the first Bugs Bunny cartoon, A Wild Hare; exemplary genre parody The Great Piggy Bank Robbery; and two of Avery's outrageous post-Looney endeavors, Swing Shift Cinderella and Red Hot Riding Hood in Technicolor prints. Tuesday, Sept. 13 Silent Tuesdays The Eagle (Clarence Brown, US 1926, 73 min., 16 mm) Rudolph Valentino, the 1920s romantic idol, never appeared to better advantage than in films where his passionate aura was tempered with sly wit, as in The Eagle, where he is an elegant Russian soldier compelled to lead a double existence after running afoul of man-hungry Catherine the Great (played by Louise Dresser). Gorgeous Hungarian co-star Vilma Banky is tougher than she looks and plays off Valentino superbly. Live piano accompaniment by Philip C. Carli. Wednesday, Sept. 14, 8 p.m. Happy 100th, Vincent Price. The Fly (Kurt Neumann, US 1958, 94 min.) "Help meee! Help meee!" Even though Vincent Price doesn't utter that immortal line, his status as a horror icon was set with this genre favorite. Price plays Francois Delambre, whose scientist brother Andre has been discovered with his head smashed in a press. What happened? Andre's wife Helene knows the unsettling story, and after it's told, Francois makes an even more disturbing discovery in the backyard. If you only know the quote (or the remake), you owe it to yourself to see this still-terrifying classic. Thursday, Sept. 15, 8 p.m. The Weird World Of Bill Plympton The Tune (Bill Plympton, US 1992, 69 min.) A songwriter is given 47 minutes to write a hit song lest he lose his job (and sweetheart) in Plympton's critically acclaimed feature debut. In a mad rush to work, Del takes a wrong exit and finds himself stranded in Flooby Nooby, a strange and unfamiliar town populated by such characters as an Elvis-impersonating dog, a noseless cab driver, a babbling guru, and a psychotic bellhop. The film was written by Plympton along with fellow cartoonist P.C. Vey and composer Maureen McElheron. Friday, Sept. 16, 8 p.m. LABOR Mahanagar (Satyajit Ray, India 1964, 131 min.) Young housewife Arati finds herself in a personal and economic crisis: her husband's job cannot sustain their family but cultural expectations dictate that she stay at home. When she finally defies her family and ventures into the city, she finds a new world, which Bengali master Ray presents as an utterly mysterious, near-mythic emblem of a complicated modernity. Print courtesy of Academy Film Archive. Saturday, Sept. 17, 8 p.m. Silent Tuesdays Without Limits (Robert Towne, US 1998, 117 min.) Steve Prefontaine decisively shifted America's attitude about track from silly high school pastime to bona fide sport, though the man himself cared more about winning and pushing himself beyond endurance than he did about cultural cachet. Billy Crudup offers an intense version of Prefontaine, who has no patience for the prissy pacing advocated by his University of Oregon coach, Bill Bowerman (Donald Sutherland). A '70s period piece crafted by filmmakers (Towne and cinematographer Conrad L. Hall) whose efforts practically define the era, as well as a running film to rival Towne's own Personal Best. In honor of the Museum's inaugural Photo Finish 5K, presented by MVP Health Care, wear your favorite race t-shirt or running shoes to the September 17 screening of Without Limits and receive reduced admission pricing. Sunday, Sept. 18, 7 p.m Happy 100th, Vincent Price. The Fly (Kurt Neumann, US 1958, 94 min.) "Help meee! Help meee!" Even though Vincent Price doesn't utter that immortal line, his status as a horror icon was set with this genre favorite. Price plays Francois Delambre, whose scientist brother Andre has been discovered with his head smashed in a press. What happened? Andre's wife Helene knows the unsettling story, and after it's told, Francois makes an even more disturbing discovery in the backyard. If you only know the quote (or the remake), you owe it to yourself to see this still-terrifying classic. Tuesday, Sept. 20, 8 p.m. Silent Tuesdays The Whistle (Lambert Hillyer, US 1921, 60 min.) and The Cry Of The Children (George O. Nichols, US 1912, 25 min.) One of the most shocking and powerful indictments of early-1900s American factories, The Whistle stars William S. Hart, usually seen as the grittiest and most moral of the early Western actors, as an Eastern mill worker whose life is tragically redirected after a violent accident. The period newspapers labelled Hart a Communist for making this film. Also, The Cry of the Children, an early impassioned plea against child labor. Both films were shot on location in actual factories, showing the period's conditions in realistic terms. Live piano accompaniment by Philip C. Carli. Wednesday, Sept. 21, 8 p.m. Happy 100th, Vincent Price The Abominable Dr. Phibes (Robert Fuest, UK/US 1971, 94 min.) It's 1925, and Dr. Anton Phibes (Vincent Price) has risen from the ashes of a "fatal" car accident to seek out the doctors who killed his wife. Employing bees, locusts, rats, and other nasty things, Phibes stays one step ahead of Scotland Yard and enjoys a revenge of Biblical proportions. A kind of art deco slasher film, Dr. Phibes is a hugely enjoyable horror masterpiece of comically complicated killings, surreal visuals, and some of the most outrageous art direction of the 1970s. Thursday, Sept. 22, 8 p.m. The Weird World Of Bill Plympton Plympton Short Films A showcase of Bill Plympton's short films, ranging from his classic earlier works Your Face and 25 Ways to Quit Smoking to some of his most recent films, including The Cow Who Wanted to Be a Hamburger, The Fan and the Flower, and the Oscar®-nominated Guard Dog series, as well as other highlights from his 25-year animation career. Friday, Sept. 23, 8 p.m. LABOR Sing Me A Love Song (Ray Enright, US 1936, 75 min., 16 mm) Department store heir Jerry Haines (Metropolitan Opera star James Melton in a rare film role) goes undercover at the family operation, befriending an elevator operator and two girls in the music department (Patricia Ellis and ZaSu Pitts) to get the straight dope on the shop. He discovers managerial malfeasance and sabotage, but not before crooning a few songs. A tuneful, casually proletariat musical comedy that displays all the characteristic strengths of '30s Warner Bros. productions. Print courtesy of the Wisconsin Center for Film and Theatre Research. Saturday, Sept. 24, 8 p.m. Halloween 2011: Truly Terrifying (& Funny, Too) The Rocky Horror Picture Show (Jim Sharman, UK 1975, 100 min.) Come spend the night with the Transexual Transylvanians! Join virginal, newly engaged Brad (Barry Bostwick) and Janet (Susan Sarandon) as they take a detour to the castle of Dr. Frank-N-Furter (Tim Curry), but beware: you may find yourselves stripped, seduced - shivering with anticipation! Meat Loaf joins the fun (as both entrée and entertainment) in this raucous audience participation classic. Reduced admission for attendees of the Rochester Sci-Fi Animation Convention with presentation of ticket stub! Sunday, Sept. 25, 7 p.m. Halloween 2011: Truly Terrifying (& Funny, Too) The Rocky Horror Picture Show (Jim Sharman, UK 1975, 100 min.) Come spend the night with the Transexual Transylvanians! Join virginal, newly engaged Brad (Barry Bostwick) and Janet (Susan Sarandon) as they take a detour to the castle of Dr. Frank-N-Furter (Tim Curry), but beware: you may find yourselves stripped, seduced - shivering with anticipation! Meat Loaf joins the fun (as both entrée and entertainment) in this raucous audience participation classic. Reduced admission for attendees of the Rochester Sci-Fi Animation Convention with presentation of ticket stub! Tuesday, Sept. 27, 8 p.m, Silent Tuesdays Tramp! Tramp! Tramp! (Harry Edwards, US 1926, 62 min.) and Counsel On De Fence (Arthur Ripley, US 1934, 20 min.) The weirdly innocent Harry Langdon, one of the "Great Four" silent comedians (alongside Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, and Harold Lloyd) appears as a befuddled contestant in a cross-country walking race in Tramp! Tramp! Tramp!, written (and partially directed) by Frank Capra and co-starring Joan Crawford in one of her first roles. This will be followed by one of Langdon's rarely seen talkie shorts, the riotous Counsel On De Fence, a spoof of 1930s courtroom dramas. Live piano accompaniment by Philip C. Carli. Wednesday, Sept. 28, 8 p.m. Happy 100th, Vincent Price Confessions Of An Opium Eater (Albert Zugsmith, US 1962, 85 min., 16mm) An astonishing artifact of Orientalist exploitation, Confessions of an Opium Eater stars Vincent Price as Gilbert "son of Thomas" De Quincey, a 19th-century explorer who lands in San Francisco at the height of a Tong war. Fueled by opium, philosophy, and fear, De Quincey plunges himself into a labyrinthine nightmare from which he can't escape. A uniquely crazed B-movie directed by the producer of Written on the Wind (!), Confessions has been called "one of the most bizarre, beautiful, and poetic Z-films ever made." Absolutely, positively not on DVD! Thursday, Sept. 29, 8 p.m. The Weird World Of Bill Plympton Adventures In Plymptoons! (Alexia Anastasio, US 2011, 85 min., digital projection) This new documentary about Bill Plympton follows his path from a Portland childhood spent drawing indoors to a self-made career as an independent animator and cartoonist. Featuring interviews with Terry Gilliam, Ralph Bakshi, Will Vinton, and other animation luminaries, Adventures in Plymptoons! is a remarkable portrait of a remarkable artist. Friday, Sept. 30, 8 p.m. LABOR Timber Gang (Yu Guangyi, China 2007, 90 min., Mandarin with English subtitles, digital projection) One of the most affecting in the profusion of recent Chinese documentaries, Yu's film follows a band of lumberjacks in the wintry Heilongjiang Province as they practice a trade that has essentially passed unchanged across generations. Appeasing mountain gods one moment and confronting the consequences of deforestation the next, the woodcutters face challenges that mark their lives as distinctly and hauntingly outside time. Yu, making a digital record of contemporary pre-industrial labor patterns, likewise straddles era.

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George Eastman House combines the world's leading museum of photography and film with the house, gardens, and estate of Kodak founder George Eastman, the father of popular photography and motion picture film. Address:              900 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14607-2298 Web site:             www.eastmanhouse.org Phone:                 (585) 271-3361 Hours:             10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday; until 8 p.m. Thursday;                         1 to 5 p.m. Sunday (closed Mondays) Museum Tours: 10:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday Garden Tours (June-August): 11:30 a.m. Tuesday though Friday; 11:30 a.m. and 3 p.m. Saturday; 3 p.m. Sunday Museum Admission: $12 for adults; $10 for senior citizens (65 and older); $5 for students; and free for children 12 and under and museum members (museum and garden tours are included with admission) Dryden Admission: $8 for the general public, $6 for students and museum members. Media Contact: Dresden Engle, Public Relations Manager dengle@geh.org 271-3361 ext. 213