CasablancaRochester, N.Y. – The George Eastman Museum presents a wide range of exhibitions, events and film series for July and August. 

2017 EXHIBITIONS

Eugene Richards: The Run-On of Time

June 10, 2017–October 22, 2017 

This retrospective exhibition features the work of Eugene Richards (American, b. 1944), one of the world’s most respected photographers.  In the tradition of W. Eugene Smith and Robert Frank, Richards is devoted to socially conscious photography that focuses on the diverse, often complex lives of Americans, as well as the ongoing struggles of the world’s poor.

 

Lucinda Devlin: Sightlines

June 24, 2017 - Dec 31, 2017

Lucinda Devlin: Sightlines includes selections from three series by American photographer Lucinda Devlin: Pleasure Ground (1977–1990), Corporal Arenas (1982–1998), and The Omega Suites (1991–1997). Best known for The Omega Suites—precisely composed images of execution chambers in the United States—Devlin has devoted her career to the relationship between our bodies and the spaces that they inhabit.  She has concentrated in particular on interiors associated with pleasure or pain, creating photographs that draw attention to the power relationships embedded in the rooms' architecture and decor.  At the same time, her photographs function as poignant meditations on the familiar yet extraordinary spaces in which our bodies pass time.  This exhibition is a reduced version of a full retrospective organized by the Weatherspoon Art Museum.

 

Stories of Indian Cinema

November 11, 2017-May 13, 2018

Stories of Indian Cinema comprises two exhibitions: Abandoned and Rescued, a selection of posters and film screenings from the George Eastman Museum’s recently acquired collection of contemporary Indian cinema, and Cinema Play House, photographer Nandita Raman’s series depicting single-screen cinemas in India, many of which are threatened by the increasing number of multiplex theaters.

Abandoned and Rescued

The George Eastman Museum has recently acquired the world’s largest collection of contemporary Indian cinema held by a museum or film archive. The collection consists of 775 prints representing 597 film titles, all in 35mm format, made between 1999 and 2013, as well as a large number of film posters. This exhibition will tell the intriguing story behind the Eastman Museum’s acquisition of this collection and will feature a selection of posters and films

Nandita Raman: Cinema Play House

Between 2006 and 2009, Nandita Raman traveled throughout India creating Cinema Play House, a series of photographs depicting the country’s slowly disappearing single-screen theaters. Raman, whose family once owned one such theater in Varanasi, India, focused her lens on the architectural anomalies that set these spaces apart from the larger multiplex theaters that currently threaten their existence.

Ongoing Exhibitions:

A History of Photography
The George Eastman Museum's History of Photography Gallery is dedicated to rotating installations that demonstrate photography’s historical trajectory through photographs and cameras from the museum’s collection.  The selection of photographs changes approximately three times a year, continually refreshing the experience of visiting the Eastman Museum and offering regular opportunities to display the museum’s treasures.

From The Camera Obscura to The Revolutionary Kodak
This three-part exhibition explores early photographic processes through cameras and related equipment from the museum’s collections.  The arc of the exhibition starts with a room-size camera obscura providing a unique view of the historic West Garden.  Making Photographs: The First 50 Years explores the development of daguerreotype, wet-plate, and dry-plate photography.  The Revolutionary Kodak gallery showcases the new system of photography that Eastman introduced to the world—through both the evolution of the camera’s first decade and the snapshots its various models captured.

JULY EVENTS

Saturday, July 1, 11 a.m.
SIGN-LANGUAGE GALLERY TOUR
Signed 45-minute house tours are led by docent Bob Menchel. Reservations strongly recommended. Private signed tours are available with advance notice. Reservations and info: tours@eastman.org or (585) 271-3361 ext. 238.

Thursday, July 6, 7:30 p.m., Dryden
DIRECTOR IN PERSON/ SPECIAL EVENT: Writer/Director Ron Shelton Presents Bull Durham
Writer/director (and former Rochester Red Wing!) Ron Shelton will introduce Bull Durham (1988), and a Q&A will follow the film. Shelton will be inducted into the Red Wings Hall of Fame on July 7as part of Bull Durham Night. $12 members, students/youth, and Red Wings season ticket holders; $15 general.

Monday, July 10-14
PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP: Salt and Albumen Printing
Learn the two most popular printing processes of the nineteenth century: salt and albumen. Hands-on workshops for anyone who loves history or photography. Registration & full schedule: eastman.org/workshops or contact photographicworkshops@eastman.org.

Wednesday, July 12, 11 a.m.
SIGN-LANGUAGE GARDEN TOUR
Signed 45-minute house tours are led by docent Bob Menchel. Reservations strongly recommended. Private signed tours are available with advance notice. Reservations and info: tours@eastman.org or (585) 271-3361 ext. 238.

Saturday, July 15, 11 a.m.
SIGN-LANGUAGE MUSEUM TOUR
Signed 45-minute house tours are led by docent Bob Menchel. Reservations strongly recommended. Private signed tours are available with advance notice. Reservations and info: tours@eastman.org or (585) 271-3361 ext. 238.

Saturday, July 15, 1 p.m., Main Galleries
GALLERY TALK: The Run-On of Time
Guest interpreter Arleen Thaler will guide visitors on a tour of the exhibition Eugene Richards: The Run-On of Time and share her own experiences as a photojournalist working in Rochester. Free to members; incl. w/museum admission.

Tuesday, July 18-21
PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP: Camera Obscura, Physionotrace, and the Silhouette
This four-day course is the only public workshop in the world that teaches how to use a box camera obscura, a tent camera obscura, a camera lucida, a pantograph, and a physionotrace to produce landscape pencil drawings and cut silhouettes. Hands-on workshops for anyone who loves history or photography. Registration & full schedule: eastman.org/workshops or contact photographicworkshops@eastman.org.

Wednesday, July 19, 7:30 p.m., Dryden
FILM SCREENING AND CONVERSATION WITH EUGENE RICHARDS
In conjunction with the exhibition The Run-On of Time, the Dryden Theatre will screen a selection of Eugene Richards’s films, followed by a conversation between Richards and curator Lisa Hostetler. Regular Dryden admission.

Saturday, July 22, 12 p.m., Curtis
FOCUS 45: Claudia Pretelin, From the Kodak Girl to the Kodak Snapshot: Kodak Advertising 1920-1940
Early Kodak advertising is mostly associated with the iconic image of the Kodak Girl. In the 1930s, Eastman Kodak Company turned their advertising campaigns over to the New York agency J. Walter Thompson. How did this change affect the public image of Kodak? In this talk, art historian Claudia Pretelin will explore this era of Kodak advertising and how it created the basis for the so-called snapshot aesthetic. Free to members; incl. w/museum admission. Talk only: $6 general, $3 students.

Wednesday, July 26, 11 a.m.
SIGN-LANGUAGE GARDEN TOUR
Signed 45-minute garden tours are led by docent Bob Menchel. Reservations strongly recommended. Private signed tours are available with advance notice. Reservations and info: tours@eastman.org or (585) 271-3361 ext. 238.

AUGUST EVENTS

Friday, August 4, 7:30 p.m., Dryden
DIRECTOR IN PERSON/ SPECIAL EVENT: Writer/ Director Phil Alden Robinson presents Field of Dreams
Writer/director Phil Alden Robinson will introduce Field of Dreams (1989), and a Q&A will follow. Special Event Tickets: $12 members, students/youth, and Red Wings season ticket holders; $15 general. Pick 6 Pass—Admission to any six screenings in the series (including special events): $32 members, students/youth, and season ticket holders; $40 general. Tickets & more information: eastman.org/baseball.

Tuesday, August 8-11
PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP: Gelatin Emulsion Dry Plate Negatives
The basics of making gelatin emulsion dry plates are covered in this fun and informative emulsion workshop for beginners. Hands-on workshops for anyone who loves history or photography. Registration & full schedule: eastman.org/workshops or contact photographicworkshops@eastman.org.

Wednesday, August 9, 6 p.m., Dryden
ARTIST TALK: Tabitha Soren
Since 2000, Tabitha Soren has followed players through their baseball lives, an alternate reality of long bus rides, on-field injuries, friendships and marriages entered and exited, constant motion, and very hard work, often for very little return. Fifteen years after her first shoot, Soren’s series and book Fantasy Life provides a selection of these stories, gathering together a richly textured series of photographs taken on the field and behind the scenes at games, along with commentaries by each of the players and memorabilia from their lives. This talk is presented in conjunction with America’s Favorite Pastime, a series of twelve baseball films on screen at the Dryden throughout July and August. Free to members, $10 general, $5 students.

Thursday, August 10, 6 p.m., Main Galleries
COMMUNITY CONVERSATION: The Run-On of Time
Providing an opportunity to engage deeper with the work in the exhibition Eugene Richards: The Run-On of Time, representatives from community partners will lead discussions on themes in Richards’s photographs. Tickets: $10; available in advance at eastman.org.

Saturday, August 12, 11 a.m.
SIGN-LANGUAGE MUSEUM TOUR
Signed 45-minute house tours are led by docent Bob Menchel. Reservations strongly recommended. Private signed tours are available with advance notice. Reservations and info: tours@eastman.org or (585) 271-3361 ext. 238

Saturday, August 12, 1 p.m.
CURATORS GALLERY TALK: History of Photography Galleries
Curatorial Assistant William Green will lead a gallery tour of his selections for the current History of Photography rotation. Free to members; incl. w/museum admission.

Wednesday, August 16, 11 a.m.
SIGN-LANGUAGE GARDEN TOUR
Signed 45-minute house tours are led by docent Bob Menchel. Reservations strongly recommended. Private signed tours are available with advance notice. Reservations and info: tours@eastman.org or (585) 271-3361 ext. 238

Saturday, August 19, 11 a.m.
SIGN-LANGUAGE GALLERY TOUR
Signed 45-minute house tours are led by docent Bob Menchel. Reservations strongly recommended. Private signed tours are available with advance notice. Reservations and info: tours@eastman.org or (585) 271-3361 ext. 238

Saturday, August 19, 12 p.m., Curtis
FOCUS 45: Mark Osterman, The Making of Motion Picture Film
Eastman Museum Process Historian Mark Osterman will give an illustrated lecture with rare images of the beginnings of the motion picture industry highlighting how early film was made—from mixing the emulsion to projection of the positive print. He will also discuss the recent revival of hand-making film right here at the Eastman Museum. Free to members; incl. w/museum admission. Talk only: $6 general, $3 students.

Saturday, August 19, 6 p.m.
LIVE MUSIC: Hidden Garden Concert: Ben Morey and The Eyes
In 2016, Ben Morey and The Eyes recorded their album Mt. Doom at the South Wedge Mission. This summer, the Eastman Museum is hosting the record’s release at a Hidden Garden Concert. Join us as this all-star cast of musicians from bands such as Pleistocene, Attic Abasement, Green Dreams, Howlo, Mikaela Davis, Maybird, The Temptators, THUNDER BODY, and more, put on a unique performance in the museum’s gardens. Special opening set by O from Chengdu, China, who has spent the last eighteen years mastering and redefining the pipa (Chinese lute). Gates open at 5:30 p.m. Tickets: $8 members, students, and youth (13–18); $10 general; free for kids 12 & under. Tickets may be purchased at the gate.

Tuesday, August 22-25
PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP: Intermediate Gelatin Emulsion Dry Plate Negatives
Building upon our basic gelatin emulsion workshops, this intermediate workshop takes emulsion making to the next level. Sold Out! Contact us to be added to the waitlist. Hands-on workshops for anyone who loves history or photography. Registration & full schedule: eastman.org/workshops or contact photographicworkshops@eastman.org.

Saturday, August 26, 11 a.m.
SIGN-LANGUAGE MUSEUM TOUR
Signed 45-minute house tours are led by docent Bob Menchel. Reservations strongly recommended. Private signed tours are available with advance notice. Reservations and info: tours@eastman.org or (585) 271-3361 ext. 238

Wednesday, August 30, 11 a.m.
SIGN-LANGUAGE GARDEN TOUR
Signed 45-minute house tours are led by docent Bob Menchel. Reservations strongly recommended. Private signed tours are available with advance notice. Reservations and info: tours@eastman.org or (585) 271-3361 ext. 238

LIVE MUSIC

PERFORMANCES IN THE MANSION
Sundays, 3 p.m.
Free to members; incl. w/ museum admission.

  • July 2: Aeolian Pipe Organ
  • July 9: Max Greenberg, jazz piano
  • July 16: Conrad Ziasniak, jazz saxophone
  • July 23: Letitia Jap, violin & Kenneth Kam, guitar
  • July 30: Lyric Academy of Music
  • August 6: Aeolian Pipe Organ
  • August 13: Caroline Nielson, vocalist
  • August 20: Joshua Lohner, viola solo
  • August 27: Xi Chen, piano solo

# # #

DRYDEN THEATRE FILM CALENDAR

July/ August 2017

FEATURED FILM SERIES 

  • Silent Tuesday, July 4
  • Tricks through Time, July 5, 11, 14, 21 ,22, 25, 28, 30, August 1
  • America’s Favorite Pastime, July 6, 12, 13, 18, 29, August 4, 9, 15, 19, 24, 30
  • 40th Anniversary, July 8, August 3, 5, 10, 12
  • Rochester International Jewish Film Festival, July 9, 15, 16
  • Dryden Kids, July 23, 30, August 6, 13 (Free for 17 & under)
  • Senior Matinees, most Mondays (Free for 55+)
  • Thank you, NEA, July 26, 27, August 2, 8, 16, 17, 20, 22, 23, 26, 27, 29, 31
  • Rochester Premieres, July 1, 2, 7, 20, August 11, 18, 25

 

# # #

Saturday July 1, 7:30 p.m. – Rochester Premiere

William Kentridge, Triumphs and Laments (Giovanni Troilo, Italy 2016, 70 min., DCP)

This documentary tells the story of the making of Triumphs and Laments, one of South African artist William Kentridge’s most ambitious and controversial projects. A colossal tribute to the history of Rome, the project is a 550-meter-long frieze on the banks of the Tiber, portraying the glories and the tragedies of the Eternal City—but the frieze itself will disappear within a few years. This film, shot with exclusive access over two years, is the most complete record of this piece, from the artist’s studio in Johannesburg through rehearsals and finally the grand opening. The film traces the connections that link Triumphs and Laments to Kentridge’s most fundamental themes, such as the refusal of racial discrimination or the complex relations between landscape and memory.

 

Sunday, July 2, 2 p.m. – Rochester Premiere

The Woman Who Left (Ang babaeng humayo, Lav Diaz, Phillippines 2016, 226 min., DCP, Tagalong w/subtitles)

Winner of the Golden Lion at the 2016 Venice Film Festival, Filipino filmmaker Lav Diaz’s epic story of revenge deferred functions as a tale of urban theater and class warfare. After thirty years in prison, a woman discovers that her friend and fellow inmate committed the murder of which she was accused. Inspired by Tolstoy, The Woman Who Left is a sensitive expression of family and forgiveness.

 

Tuesday, July 4, 7:30 p.m. – Independence Day | Silent Tuesday

A Day’s Pleasure (Charles Chaplin, US 1919, 24 min., 35mm)

Shoulder Arms (Charles Chaplin, US 1918, 45 min., 35mm)

The classic Chaplin short A Day’s Pleasure reminds us how aggravating a day out with the family can be, while Shoulder Arms offers a sincere and tasteful satire of trench warfare in World War I. “Ladies and Gentleman—Charlie in this picture lies down his cane and picks up the sword to fight for Democracy.”– Charles Chaplin

Live piano by Philip C. Carli. Special support provided by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

 

Wednesday, July 5, 7:30 p.m. – Tricks Through Time

The Sea of Ravens (Mor vran, Jean Epstein. France 1930, 25 min., 16mm, French w/subtitles)

M (Fritz Lang, Germany 1931, 106 min., 35 mm, German w/subtitles)

Fritz Lang (Metropolis) and Jean Epstein (The Fall of the House of Usher) each gifted film history the most stunning imagery and visual effects. We present their first studio-produced sound films, inviting you to explore how Lang and Epstein assimilated what sound technologies had to offer to the art and imagination of cinema. The Sea of Ravens is the second docu-fiction Epstein directed in his beloved Brittany, casting the weathered bodies and faces of local islanders. And after hearing Peter Lorre’s whistle in Lang’s drama-thriller M, you will never be able to forget his shadow . . .

 

Thursday, July 6, 7:30 p.m. – America’s Favorite Pastime | Director in Person!

Bull Durham (Ron Shelton, US 1988, 108 min., 35mm)

“Crash” Davis (Kevin Costner) is a veteran minor league catcher who once had a “cup of coffee” in the majors. His newest project is a young power pitcher named “Nuke” LaLoosh who is supposed to be the next big thing if he can learn how to control his pitches. Unfortunately for Crash, Nuke is also taken under the wing of sultry Annie Savoy (Susan Sarandon), who has her own special training regimen, and may just be the woman Crash has been waiting his entire life for. Introduction by writer/director Ron Shelton, who played for the Rochester Red Wings before going into film. Q&A with Shelton will follow the screening. Tickets: $12 members, students, and Red Wing season ticket holders; $15 general. Available at eastman.org/baseball

 

Friday, July 7, 7:30 p.m. – Rochester Premiere

Last Men in Aleppo (Firas Fayyad, Steen Johannessen, Syria/Denmark 2017, 104 min., DCP, Arabic w/subtitles)

Winner of the Grand Jury Documentary prize at the Sundance Film Festival, Syrian filmmaker Feras Fayyad’s breathtaking work—a searing example of boots-on-the-ground reportage—follows the efforts of the internationally recognized White Helmets, an organization comprised of ordinary citizens who are the first to rush towards explosions in the hope of saving lives. Incorporating moments of both heart-pounding suspense and improbable beauty, the documentary draws us into the lives of three of its founders—Khaled, Subhi, and Mahmoud—as they grapple with the chaos around them and struggle with an ever-present dilemma: to flee with their families or stay and fight for their country. A gripping portrait of extraordinary bravery, Last Men in Aleppo provides a stirring new perspective on a conflict reshaping our world.

 

Saturday, July 8, 7:30 p.m. – 40th Anniversary

Saturday Night Fever (John Badham, US 1977, 118 min., 35mm)

The one and only John Travolta is Tony Manero, a Brooklyn paint store clerk who becomes a sex god every Saturday night as he clears the dance floor of the local disco to the tunes of the Bee Gees, Kool and the Gang, and KC and the Sunshine Band.

 

Sunday, July 9, 1 p.m. – Rochester International Jewish Film Festival

Abulele (Jonathan Geva, Israel 2015, 96 min., DCP, Hebrew w/subtitles)

In this story reminiscent of E.T., ten-year-old Adam meets Abulele, a friendly, huge, invisible monster. When he befriends and shelters this delightful mythical creature, he is able to outsmart bullies and overcome his grief following his brother’s death. Tickets & info: rjff.org/festival-information

 

Sunday July 9, 3:30 p.m. – Rochester International Jewish Film Festival

There Are Jews Here (Brad Lichtenstein, Morgan Elise Johnson, US 2016, 90 min., DCP)

This documentary follows the untold stories of four once thriving American Jewish communities that are now barely holding on. For them, Jewish identity is a daily, urgent challenge; if they don’t personally uphold their communities and live affirmative Jewish lives, their legacies could fade away forever. A discussion with Rabbi Alan Katz of Temple Sinai and Dr. Wes Perkins, sociologist, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, will follow. Tickets & info: rjff.org/festival-information

 

Sunday, July 9, 7 p.m. – Rochester International Jewish Film Festival

The Women’s Balcony (Ismach Hatani, Emil Ben-Shimon, Israel 2016, 96 min., DCP, Hebrew w/ subtitles)

A mishap at a synagogue causes a rift in a devout community in this rousing, comical feminist narrative about speaking truth to patriarchal power—a battle of the sexes ensues, threatening to tear apart families and friends, husbands and wives, congregational stalwarts. Tickets & info: rjff.org/festival-information

 

Monday, July 10, 1:30 p.m. - Senior Matinee—Free for 55+

A Day’s Pleasure (Charles Chaplin, US 1919, 24 min., 35mm)

Shoulder Arms (Charles Chaplin, US 1918, 45 min., 35mm)

The classic Chaplin short A Day’s Pleasure reminds us how aggravating a day out with the family can be, while Shoulder Arms offers a sincere and tasteful satire of trench warfare in World War I. “Ladies and Gentleman—Charlie in this picture lies down his cane and picks up the sword to fight for Democracy.”– Charles Chaplin

Live piano by Philip C. Carli. Special support provided by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

 

Tuesday, July 11, 7:30 p.m. – Tricks through Time

Charcuterie mécanique (The Mechanical Butcher, Lumière, France 1896, 1 min.)

Le squelette joyeux (Lumière, France 1897, 1 min.)

Le voyage dans la lune (A Trip to the Moon, Georges Méliès, France 1902, 13 min.)

Voyage à travers l’impossible (Georges Méliès, France 1904, 20 min.)

Le matelas alcoolique (The Drunken Mattress, Alice Guy, France 1906, 9 min.)

Les fromages automobiles (The Skipping Cheese, Georges Méliès, France 1907, 4 min.)

La rose bleue (A Busy Cupid, Léonce Perret, France 1911, 7 min.)

All presented in 35mm.

Considered the father of special effects, Georges Méliès is often seen as being in opposition with the realistic productions of the Lumière brothers. Yet the popularity of trick films didn’t escape the Lumieres’ entrepreneurial eye, and this short program invites you to delve into the magic of trick cinematography and hand-coloring techniques as used by Méliès, Lumière, and Gaumont in the flowering years of French film production. Live piano by Philip C. Carli. Special support provided by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

 

Wednesday, July 12, 7:30 p.m. – America’s Favorite Pastime

Damn Yankees! (George Abbott, Stanley Donen, US 1958, 111 min., 35mm)

In this Faustian story, a Washington Senators fanatic sells his soul to the devil just to see his team beat the Yankees. Based on the eponymous Broadway musical, this film features the immortal song “Whatever Lola Wants” and memorable dancing by Gwen Verdon and Bob Fosse.

“Maybe you think that was a heat wave that hit town yesterday. We prefer to think it was Gwen Verdon making her debut hereabouts as a star in a film. For her sizzling performance in Damn Yankees, the Technicolored screen version of the Broadway show that is serving to return the Roxy to a pictureand-stage-show policy, is one of the hottest and heartiest we’ve seen in a musical movie in years. And if that isn’t what warmed the weather, it should certainly do a lot to warm you.” – Bosley Crowther, New York Times, September 27, 1958.

 

Thursday, July 13, 7:30 p.m. – America’s Favorite Pastime

The Natural (Barry Levinson, US 1984, 138 min., 35mm)

In the late 1930s, the New York Knights sign unknown hitter Roy Hobbs (Robert Redford), a natural baseball player with a checkered past. As the Knights surge in the standings, bolstered by his hitting, Hobbs learns that the only reason he was brought to the majors was to ensure that the Knights lose. He rejects bribes from gamblers and advances from women to ensure that his one shot at the big leagues means something. Many of the baseball scenes for this film were shot in Buffalo, including at All-High Stadium, which stood in for the Chicago Cubs’ Wrigley Field.

 

Friday, July 14, 7:30 p.m. – Tricks through Time

My Uncle (Jacques Tati, France 1958, 117 min., 35mm, French w/subtitles)

Heir of the Lumière brothers and Charlie Chaplin’s sense of comic everyday existence, Jacques Tati’s famous character Monsieur Hulot in My Uncle visits his sister’s ultra-contemporary home and grapples uproariously with all its modern “conveniences.” In this enduring satire on technological gadgetry, Tati reminds us that “all serious things should be smiled out of existence and . . . funny things are ultimately matters for serious thought” (Richard W. Nason, New York Times).

 

Saturday, July 15, 6 p.m. – Rochester International Jewish Film Festival

Mr. Predictable (Yeled Tov Yerushalyim, Roee Florentin, Israel 2016, 103 min., DCP, Hebrew w/subtitles)

This charming comedy follows Adi, who has always been a “good boy.” Then he meets Natalia, who entices him into a life of passion and romance. Will he be brave enough to be who he really wants to be? Tickets & info: rjff.org/festival-information

 

Saturday, July 15, 8:45 p.m. – Rochester International Jewish Film Festival

Atomic Falafel (Dror Shaul, Israel/ New Zealand/ Germany 2015, 93 min., FORMAT, English, Farsi, and Hebrew w/subtitles)

A fast-paced satire with a pro-peace message, this film encompasses the Israel-Iran nuclear showdown, the internet friendship of two teens from the opposing countries, a hacker’s first romance, and a falafel maker’s discovery of a new love. Tickets & info: rjff.org/festival-information

 

Sunday, July 16, 11 a.m. - Rochester International Jewish Film Festival

Ben-Gurion, Epilogue (Yariv Mozer, Israel/ France 2016, 70min., DCP, English and Hebrew w/subtitles)

An introspective David Ben-Gurion reflects on the loss of his wife, his health and political legacy, and his hopes for Middle East peace. Languishing for decades, the reels of silent footage were uncovered in the Steven Spielberg Jewish Film Archive in Jerusalem, with the corresponding soundtrack later found in the Ben-Gurion Archives in the Negev. Tickets & info: rjff.org/festival-information

 

Sunday, July 16, 1 p.m. - Rochester International Jewish Film Festival

The Second Time Around (Leon Marr, Canada 2016, 107 min., DCP)

A vivacious, opera-loving widow finds herself in an assisted living facility with a broken hip. She seems unable to soften the heart of a cranky, cynical Polish immigrant still raw from the death of his wife, until a shared love of music sows the seeds of a blossoming romance. Tickets & info: rjff.org/festival-information

 

Sunday, July 16, 5 p.m. - Rochester International Jewish Film Festival

The Children of Chance (Les enfants de la chance, Malik Chibane, France 2015, 95 min., DCP, French w/subtitles)

In this tender drama, a Jewish boy finds friendship and safety in a children’s hospital in Nazi-occupied France. Winner of the European Children’s Film Association award and based on a true story, this film is a testament to the resilience and bravery of youth, as captured in the charming, naturalistic performances of its young ensemble cast. Tickets & info: rjff.org/festival-information

 

Sunday, July 16, 7:30 p.m. - Rochester International Jewish Film Festival

Shalom Italia (Tamar Tal Anati, Israel/Germany 2016, 70 min., DCP, Hebrew and Italian w/subtitles)

Three Italian Jewish brothers set off in search of a cave where they hid as children to escape the Nazis. Their quest, full of humor, food, and Tuscan landscapes, straddles the boundary between history and myth. Filmmaker Tamar Tal will be present. Tickets & info: rjff.org/festival-information

 

Monday, July 17, 1:30 p.m. - Senior Matinee—Free for 55+

Casablanca (Michael Curtiz, US 1942, 102 min., 35mm)

The inimitable Humphrey Bogart plays Rick, the cynical owner of a nightclub in WWII-era Morocco, haunted by memories of deserted lover Ilsa (Ingrid Bergman). When their paths cross by some twist of fate, Rick must confront his past. The supporting cast includes Sydney Greenstreet, Dooley Wilson, Peter Lorre, Claude Rains, Conrad Veidt, and Paul Henreid. If you’ve never experienced Casablanca on the big screen, don’t miss this opportunity, and if you have—well . . . play it again, Sam.

 

Tuesday, July 18, 7:30 p.m. - America’s Favorite Pastime

Speedy (Ted Wilde, US 1928, 85 min., 35mm)

In a rollicking action comedy that rivals the masterful Safety Last, Harold Lloyd plays Harold “Speedy” Swift. A dreamer and schemer, Speedy gets himself involved in a number of outrageous slapstick stunts in his attempts to hold down a job. The highlights include a climactic mad dash across New York City in a horse-drawn trolley and Speedy’s equally uproarious taxi ride to Yankee Stadium with terrified passenger Babe Ruth (playing himself!). Live piano by Philip C. Carli. Special support provided by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

 

Wednesday, July 19, 7:30 p.m. - Artist in Person

The Rain Will Follow (Eugene Richards, US 2016, 15 min., DCP)

Though confined to a nursing home, 90-year-old Melvin Wisdahl lives an interior life, filled with images of the war he fought in, the struggles of the early Norwegian settlers of North Dakota, his ghost town of a home, his love of the ever-evolving and threatened land. This screening will also include a five-minute excerpt from Richards’s new film Thy Kingdom Come, which will premiere at the Sundance Film Festival in January 2018, and shorts associated with four different series of photographs on view in his retrospective exhibition: A Procession of Them (US 2008, 5 min. 49 sec., digital video); Stepping Through the Ashes (US 2011, 7 min. 6 sec., digital video); The Blue Room (US 2015, 8 min. 52 sec., digital video); Red Ball of a Sun Slipping Down (US 2015, 9 min. 21 sec., digital video). Discussion with Eugene Richards will follow.

 

Thursday, July 20, 7:30 p.m. - Rochester Premiere | Primal Screen

Mimosas (Oliver Laxe, Morocco/Spain/Qatar/France 2016, 96 min., DCP, Arabic w/subtitles)

A dying sheikh wishes to be buried in the legendary Moroccan city of Sijilmasa, across the majestic Atlas Mountains. The caravan is led by a young man who speaks and acts like a prophet. The group’s journey across the magnificent landscapes of North Africa looks like a modern-day version of Werner Herzog’s Aguirre, the Wrath of God, or of a John Ford western, but has the allure of a mystical poem. The film—partly inspired by the ethnographic works of Ben Rivers—is divided in three parts, like the sections of a Sufi prayer; past and present collide in a contemplative, deeply cinematic vision (shot in breathtaking Super16mm), highly deserving the Grand Prize at last year’s Cannes Critics’ Week. Presented by Paolo Cherchi Usai, Senior Curator, Moving Image Department.

 

Friday, July 21, 7:30 p.m. - Tricks through Time

Composition in Blue (Komposition in Blau, Oskar Fischinger, Germany 1935, 5 min., 35mm)

Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, US 1958, 128 min., 35mm)

In Hitchcock’s most personal film, a retired San Francisco detective (James Stewart) is hired to follow the wife (Kim Novak) of a former school chum. Slowly, inexorably, he becomes obsessed with his charge, but both are haunted by their own personal ghosts. Manipulating narrative and audience expectations, Vertigo stands as perhaps the most profoundly fascinating and disturbing film ever to emerge from the Hollywood system. The dense color palette of the film—shot in Technicolor—plays a key part in the mystery and emotion of the film. Bernard Hermann’s orchestration of Vertigo’s hues will be preceded by the more literal color symphony directed by famous animator Oskar Fischinger. Also showing: Saturday, July 22, 7:30 p.m.

 

Saturday, July 22, 7:30 p.m. - Tricks through Time

Composition in Blue (Komposition in Blau, Oskar Fischinger, Germany 1935, 5 min., 35mm)

Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, US 1958, 128 min., 35mm)

In Hitchcock’s most personal film, a retired San Francisco detective (James Stewart) is hired to follow the wife (Kim Novak) of a former school chum. Slowly, inexorably, he becomes obsessed with his charge, but both are haunted by their own personal ghosts. Manipulating narrative and audience expectations, Vertigo stands as perhaps the most profoundly fascinating and disturbing film ever to emerge from the Hollywood system. The dense color palette of the film—shot in Technicolor—plays a key part in the mystery and emotion of the film. Bernard Hermann’s orchestration of Vertigo’s hues will be preceded by the more literal color symphony directed by famous animator Oskar Fischinger.


Sunday, July 23, 2 p.m.- Dryden Kids—Free for 17 & under

Lassie Come Home (Fred M. Wilcox, US 1943, 98 min., 35mm)

The ultimate boy-and-his-dog movie—and the first in the warmest, fuzziest film franchise of all time—stars young Roddy McDowall as Joe Carraclough, an impoverished Yorkshire lad who must sell off his best friend, a Rough Collie named Lassie (beautifully played by legendary canine star Pal), when his family falls upon hard times. Lassie’s aristocratic new owner (Nigel Bruce) ships Lassie off to Scotland, where his granddaughter (a 10-year-old Elizabeth Taylor, in her second film) helps a homesick Lassie plot her escape.

 

Monday, July 24, 1:30 p.m. - Senior Matinee—Free for 55+

Speedy (Ted Wilde, US 1928, 85 min., 35mm)

In a rollicking action comedy that rivals the masterful Safety Last, Harold Lloyd plays Harold “Speedy” Swift. A dreamer and schemer, Speedy gets himself involved in a number of outrageous slapstick stunts in his attempts to hold down a job. The highlights include a climactic mad dash across New York City in a horse-drawn trolley and Speedy’s equally uproarious taxi ride to Yankee Stadium with terrified passenger Babe Ruth (playing himself!). Live piano by Philip C. Carli. Special support provided by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

 

Tuesday, July 25, 7:30 p.m. - Tricks through Time

The Great Train Robbery (Edwin S. Porter, US 1903, 12 min., 35mm)

Way Down East (D. W. Griffith, US 1920, 148 min., 35mm)

The second silent night of our special effects program is dedicated to the fathers of editing and suspense, Porter and Griffith. Porter’s milestone The Great Train Robbery is one of the earliest films to use the technique of cross cutting, in which two scenes happening in two different locations are shown simultaneously. Griffith’s dynamic flair for action makes the best of this innovation in the classic climatic sequence of Way Down East on top of breaking ice floes. Live piano by Philip C. Carli. Special support provided by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

 

Wednesday, July 26, 7:30 p.m. - Thank You, NEA

Broadway Melody of 1940 (Norman Taurog, US 1940, 103 min., 35mm)

This delightful MGM musical featuring songs by the unparalleled Cole Porter finds Fred Astaire and George Murphy as an aspiring dance team. Murphy is mistakenly given the starring role in a Broadway show, but he eventually realizes that it is his partner who truly deserves the role and feigns illness to give Astaire the chance to shine alongside the unforgettable Eleanor Powell. The rare teaming of Astaire and Powell is fully showcased in the legendary “Begin the Beguine” number that is the centerpiece of this magical musical.

 

Thursday, July 27, 7:30 p.m. - Thank You, NEA

New York Nights (Lewis Milestone, US 1929, 64 min., 35mm)

Silent-screen superstar Norma Talmadge, who appeared in 160 films during the silent era, made only two talkies before her Hollywood career came to a screeching halt. Why, exactly, remains a mystery. In this entertaining mash-up of backstage musical and gritty crime drama, Talmadge not only talks for the first time on screen, she sings as well, and she’s quite good at both. She stars as a leading lady of the Broadway stage who, married to an alcoholic songwriter (Gilbert Roland), gets mixed up with the lecherous gangster (John Wray) producing her latest show.

 

Friday, July 28, 7:30 p.m. - Tricks through Time

The Andromeda Strain (Robert Wise, US 1971, 131 min., 35mm)

Could a program on special effects be complete without the mention of legendary filmmaker and visual effects pioneer Douglas Trumbull? Based on the novel by Michael Crichton, this sci-fi thriller stars Arthur Hill, James Olson, Kate Reid, and David Wayne as a team of scientists investigating the outbreak of a deadly microorganism brought to Earth on a satellite. With The Andromeda Strain, Trumbull experiments with photographic visual effects he had used in Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey and innovates with advanced computer renderings for the first time in Hollywood.

 

Saturday, July 29, 7:30 p.m. - America’s Favorite Pastime

Major League (David S. Ward, US 1989, 107 min., DCP)

The Cleveland Indians haven’t won the World Series since 1948, and the new owner—a Vegas showgirl who inherited the team from her husband—would rather move the team to Florida. To trigger an escape clause in the team’s lease, she needs to drop season attendance below a certain level, so she loads the team with over-the-hill players, problem projects, unproven rookies, and a bitter manager. Once the team discovers her plan, however, they know the only way to salvage their careers is to win the division and beat the hated Yankees. One of the most popular and quotable of all baseball comedies!

 

Sunday, July 30, 2 p.m. - Dryden Kids—Free for 17 & under | Tricks through Time

Mysterious Island (Cy Endfield, US 1961, 101 min., 35mm)

Confederate officers escape their Civil War prison only to be blown off course in this film version of Jules Verne’s exciting sequel to 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. The soldiers land on a strange volcanic island populated by giant animals and meet up with pirates, shipwreck survivors, and Captain Nemo and his amazing Nautilus submarine. Marvelous special effects by Ray Harryhausen and a Bernard Herrmann musical score enliven this fantasy classic.

 

Monday, July 31, 1:30 p.m. - Senior Matinee—Free for 55+

Broadway Melody of 1940 (Norman Taurog, US 1940, 103 min., 35mm)

This delightful MGM musical featuring songs by the unparalleled Cole Porter finds Fred Astaire and George Murphy as an aspiring dance team. Murphy is mistakenly given the starring role in a Broadway show, but he eventually realizes that it is his partner who truly deserves the role and feigns illness to give Astaire the chance to shine alongside the unforgettable Eleanor Powell. The rare teaming of Astaire and Powell is fully showcased in the legendary “Begin the Beguine” number that is the centerpiece of this magical musical.

 

Tuesday, August 1, 7:30 p.m. - Tricks through Time

The Phantom Carriage (Körkarlen, Victor Sjöström, Sweden 1921, 93 min., 35mm, Swedish w/subtitles)

One of the towering achievements of silent cinema, Sjöström’s allegory is based on a Swedish legend that the last person to die each year must drive the chariot that collects the dead. When an inebriated brawler dies at midnight on New Year’s Eve, he is given the chance to review and correct his life’s errors. Shot entirely on elaborate studio sets, The Phantom Carriage features a poetic style of double exposures and superimpositions that blends with the universality of its theme. Live piano by Philip C. Carli. Special support provided by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

 

Wednesday, August 2, 7:30 p.m. - Thank You, NEA

Anna Karenina (Clarence Brown, US 1935, 95 min., 35mm)

Tolstoy’s enigmatic heroine has come to the screen in various incarnations, but none has ever exposed the inner life of Anna Karenina with so much pathos, hope, and regret as Greta Garbo. Stripped of the trappings of 19th-century Russia, her Anna is every woman who has ever been swept away by the passion of pure physical attraction. Anna is loved by her husband, her son, and her friends; she has status, wealth, and security. She rashly trades all of that for a dead-end love affair with Fredric March’s dashing Count Vronsky. Cut adrift, her spirit withers in that environment as she realizes that her undying passion is neither sustainable nor reciprocated.

 

Thursday, August 3, 7:30 p.m. – 40th Anniversary

New York, New York (Martin Scorsese, US 1977, 155 min., 35mm)

Martin Scorsese’s homage to musical melodramas like A Star Is Born and The Man I Love tells of the stormy romance of hotheaded jazz saxophonist and bandleader Jimmy Doyle (Robert DeNiro) and singer Francine Evans (Liza Minnelli). As Francine’s star ascends, the lovers’ relationship begins a downward spiral. Combining big-budget production numbers and elaborate set design with DeNiro and Scorsese’s trademark improvisatory style, New York, New York is a singularly striking artistic achievement. Also showing: Saturday, August 5, 7:30 p.m.

 

Friday, August 4, 7:30 p.m. - America’s Favorite Pastime | Director in Person!

Field of Dreams (Phil Alden Robinson, US 1989, 107 min., 35mm)

Ray Kinsella (Kevin Costner) is an Iowa corn farmer with some demons in his past. He begins to hear voices and see visions related to baseball. After plowing under part of his crop to build a baseball field, he is led by the voices on a road trip, meeting along the way a bitter radical (James Earl Jones) and a retired physician (Burt Lancaster)—all of this in an attempt to heed the voices’ plea to “ease his pain.” Baseball is magic in this film, bringing past and present together in a healing act that will give you a second chance, if only you believe. If we show it, you will come. Introduction by writer/director Phil Alden Robinson. Q&A with Robinson will follow the screening. Tickets: $12 members, students, and Red Wing season ticket holders; $15 general. Available at eastman.org/baseball

 

Saturday, August 5, 7:30 p.m. - 40th Anniversary

New York, New York (Martin Scorsese, US 1977, 155 min., 35mm)

Martin Scorsese’s homage to musical melodramas like A Star Is Born and The Man I Love tells of the stormy romance of hotheaded jazz saxophonist and bandleader Jimmy Doyle (Robert DeNiro) and singer Francine Evans (Liza Minnelli). As Francine’s star ascends, the lovers’ relationship begins a downward spiral. Combining big-budget production numbers and elaborate set design with DeNiro and Scorsese’s trademark improvisatory style, New York, New York is a singularly striking artistic achievement.

 

Sunday, August 6, 2 p.m. - Dryden Kids—Free for 17 & under | America’s Favorite Pastime

The Sandlot (David M. Evans, US 1993, 101 min., 35mm)

It is the summer of 1962, and Scotty Smalls has just moved to town. There is a ready-made group of friends in the neighborhood, if only Scotty knew how to play baseball. Luckily, the best player— Benny “The Jet”—sees something in Scotty, and the team takes him under their wings, teaching him all about baseball, s’mores, and Big Chief, while learning about girls, rivalry, and prejudice. Shot through a nostalgic haze, this comedy for all ages is full of the stakes only an 11-year-old can understand. With the help of Babe Ruth’s ghost, this team will become legends, and legends never die. Preceded by a 35mm print of Abbott and Costello’s famous “Who’s on First?” routine.

 

Monday, August 7, 1:30 p.m. - Senior Matinee—Free for 55+

Anna Karenina (Clarence Brown, US 1935, 95 min., 35mm)

Tolstoy’s enigmatic heroine has come to the screen in various incarnations, but none has ever exposed the inner life of Anna Karenina with so much pathos, hope, and regret as Greta Garbo. Stripped of the trappings of 19th-century Russia, her Anna is every woman who has ever been swept away by the passion of pure physical attraction. Anna is loved by her husband, her son, and her friends; she has status, wealth, and security. She rashly trades all of that for a dead-end love affair with Fredric March’s dashing Count Vronsky. Cut adrift, her spirit withers in that environment as she realizes that her undying passion is neither sustainable nor reciprocated.

 

Tuesday, August 8, 7:30 p.m. - Thank You, NEA

Possessed (Clarence Brown, US 1931, 76 min., 35mm)

Joan Crawford leaves small-town Pennsylvania for the bright lights of New York City, where she meets and falls in love with Clark Gable, a successful and wealthy lawyer. Gable is separated and has his heart set on political office, so Crawford masquerades as a Park Avenue divorcee and the two carry on their lovemaking in secret. But things can’t stay this way for long. . . . A tale of glamour and sacrifice, with an added treat: Joan singing “How Long Can It Last?” in three languages.

 

Wednesday, August 9, 8 p.m. - America’s Favorite Pastime

A League of Their Own (Penny Marshall, US 1992, 128 min., 35mm)

When candy tycoon Walter Harvey gets wind of the impending shutdown of professional baseball due to World War II, he posits a revolutionary idea: create a women’s baseball league in its place! In Oregon, competitive sisters Dottie (Geena Davis) and Kit (Lori Petty) are recruited by a scout and brought to Chicago, where they form a team that goes on to transform the perceptions of men and the lives of women across the nation. Based on the true story of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, this rousing comedy remains hilarious and heartfelt, and was added to the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress in 2012. Note later start time.

 

Thursday, August 10, 7:30 p.m. - 40th Anniversary

Eraserhead (David Lynch, US 1977, 90 min., 35mm)

David Lynch’s feature film debut was greeted with massive acclaim on the midnight movie circuit and stands as one of the most haunting and renowned cult classics of American cinema, introducing audiences to the director’s unique unsettling aesthetic. Set in an eerily dark, fetid industrial landscape, the film follows a young couple (Jack Nance and Charlotte Stewart) as they struggle with married life and the arrival of an unexpected and hideously deformed child. Nightmarish hallucinations, adultery, and violence follow as the family dissolves in their squalid existence. Meticulously constructed sound design and visceral black-and-white cinematography create a grotesque and surreal cinematic experience, foreshadowing Lynch’s later mainstream successes which plumb the vile and insidious depths of the American family. The Eastman Museum is one of the very few archives to hold a 35mm print of this iconic film. Also showing: Saturday, August 12, 7:30 p.m.

 

Friday, August 11, 7:30 p.m. - Rochester Premiere

David Lynch: The Art Life (Jon Nguyen, US 2016, 93 min., DCP)

David Lynch: The Art Life looks at Lynch’s art, music, and early films, shining a light into the dark corners of his unique world and giving audiences a better understanding of the man and the artist. As Lynch says, “I think every time you do something, like a painting or whatever, you go with ideas, and sometimes the past can conjure those ideas and color them. Even if they’re new ideas, the past colors them.” We’re invited in and given private views from Lynch’s compound and painting studio in the hills high above Hollywood, as he tells personal stories that unfold like scenes from his films. Strange characters come into focus only to fade again into the past, all leaving an indelible mark.

 

Saturday, August 12, 7:30 p.m. - 40th Anniversary

Eraserhead (David Lynch, US 1977, 90 min., 35mm)

David Lynch’s feature film debut was greeted with massive acclaim on the midnight movie circuit and stands as one of the most haunting and renowned cult classics of American cinema, introducing audiences to the director’s unique unsettling aesthetic. Set in an eerily dark, fetid industrial landscape, the film follows a young couple (Jack Nance and Charlotte Stewart) as they struggle with married life and the arrival of an unexpected and hideously deformed child. Nightmarish hallucinations, adultery, and violence follow as the family dissolves in their squalid existence. Meticulously constructed sound design and visceral black-and-white cinematography create a grotesque and surreal cinematic experience, foreshadowing Lynch’s later mainstream successes which plumb the vile and insidious depths of the American family. The Eastman Museum is one of the very few archives to hold a 35mm print of this iconic film.

 

Sunday, August 13, 2 p.m. - Dryden Kids—Free for 17 & under

Son of Lassie (S. Sylvan Simon, US 1945, 102 min., 35mm)

Gorgeously shot in Technicolor, the second in MGM’s massively successful seven-film series follows the adventures of grown-up Joe Carraclough (Peter Lawford), now an RAF pilot who is shot down over Nazi-occupied Norway along with a stowaway: Laddie, the son of Joe’s beloved Rough Collie Lassie (in a remarkable dual performance, the great canine star Pal plays both mother and son). Quite a bit darker in tone than Lassie Come Home— only fitting, given the war-time setting—but still great for kids, this is one sequel that delivers all the thrills and, yes, tears of its celebrated predecessor.

 

Monday, August 14, 1:30 p.m. - Senior Matinee—Free for 55+

Possessed (Clarence Brown, US 1931, 76 min., 35mm)

Joan Crawford leaves small-town Pennsylvania for the bright lights of New York City, where she meets and falls in love with Clark Gable, a successful and wealthy lawyer. Gable is separated and has his heart set on political office, so Crawford masquerades as a Park Avenue divorcee and the two carry on their lovemaking in secret. But things can’t stay this way for long. . . . A tale of glamour and sacrifice, with an added treat: Joan singing “How Long Can It Last?” in three languages.

 

Tuesday, August 15, 7:30 p.m. - America’s Favorite Pastime

The Pride of the Yankees (Sam Wood, US 1942, 128 min., 35mm)

A moving biopic of legendary Yankees first baseman Lou Gehrig—the left-handed player who rose to the top of the sport, only to be cut down at the peak of his career by an incurable illness. A heart-warming, truly American classic, this film stars Gary Cooper in one of his most memorable performances as the great baseball hero and features real-life Bronx Bomber teammates Babe Ruth, Bill Dickey, Mark Koenig, and Bob Muesel.

 

Wednesday, August 16, 7:30 p.m. - Thank You, NEA

Indiscreet (Leo McCarey, US 1932, 73 min., 35mm)

Gloria Swanson stars in this effervescent pre-Code comedy from legendary Hollywood director Leo McCarey. A fashion designer finds herself caught in a farcical web of lies as she endeavors to keep her sister apart from a former flame. Though better remembered today for her work in silent melodramas, Swanson was a charming comedienne.

 

Thursday, August 17, 7:30 p.m. - Thank You, NEA

The Bad and the Beautiful (Vincente Minnelli, US 1952, 118 min., 35mm)

With characters loosely based on Hollywood players such as David O. Selznick, Diana Barrymore, and Val Lewton, The Bad and the Beautiful hits home in the backstage drama department. Bolstered by Minnelli’s clear, insightful direction and a first-rate cast—Kirk Douglas, Dick Powell, Gloria Grahame, Gilbert Roland, and Lana Turner in probably her best performance ever—the film peels back the complicated layers of one producer’s life and work and the love/hate relationships that sustain him. Selfishness, generosity, and psychological manipulation are all just tricks of the movie business trade. Also showing: Sunday, August 20, 2 p.m.

 

Friday, August 18, 7:30 p.m. - Rochester Premiere

Staying Vertical (Rester vertical, Alain Guiraudie, France 2016, 100 min., DCP, French w/subtitles)

Filmmaker Leo is searching for the wolf in the south of France. During a scouting excursion he is seduced by Marie, a free-spirited and dynamic shepherdess. Nine months later, she gives birth to their child. Suffering from postpartum depression and with no faith in Leo, who comes and goes without warning, Marie abandons both of them. Leo finds himself alone, with a baby to care for. It’s not easy, but deep down, he loves it. Through a series of unexpected and unusual encounters, struggling to find inspiration for his next film, Leo will do whatever it takes to stay standing. One of the most refreshingly original and provocative European films of 2016. For mature audiences only.

 

Saturday, August 19, 7:30 p.m. - America’s Favorite Pastime

Bad News Bears (Michael Ritchie, US 1976, 102 min., 35mm)

Alcoholic ex–minor leaguer Morris Buttermaker (Walter Matthau) is hired to coach a Little League team full of misfits so uncoordinated they forfeit their first game 26–0. Pulling in two ringers—a tomboy pitcher (Tatum O’Neal) and a bad boy centerfielder (Jackie Earle Haley)—Buttermaker is able to get the team into shape, but the drive to win soon pushes him to outrageous extremes. Matthau is at his hangdog best in this joyfully vulgar ’70s classic from the underrated Michael Ritchie.

 

Sunday, August 20, 2 p.m. - Thank You, NEA

The Bad and the Beautiful (Vincente Minnelli, US 1952, 118 min., 35mm)

With characters loosely based on Hollywood players such as David O. Selznick, Diana Barrymore, and Val Lewton, The Bad and the Beautiful hits home in the backstage drama department. Bolstered by Minnelli’s clear, insightful direction and a first-rate cast—Kirk Douglas, Dick Powell, Gloria Grahame, Gilbert Roland, and Lana Turner in probably her best performance ever—the film peels back the complicated layers of one producer’s life and work and the love/hate relationships that sustain him. Selfishness, generosity, and psychological manipulation are all just tricks of the movie business trade.

 

Monday, August 21, 1:30 p.m. - Senior Matinee—Free for 55+

The Bad and the Beautiful (Vincente Minnelli, US 1952, 118 min., 35mm)

With characters loosely based on Hollywood players such as David O. Selznick, Diana Barrymore, and Val Lewton, The Bad and the Beautiful hits home in the backstage drama department. Bolstered by Minnelli’s clear, insightful direction and a first-rate cast—Kirk Douglas, Dick Powell, Gloria Grahame, Gilbert Roland, and Lana Turner in probably her best performance ever—the film peels back the complicated layers of one producer’s life and work and the love/hate relationships that sustain him. Selfishness, generosity, and psychological manipulation are all just tricks of the movie business trade.

 

Tuesday, August 22, 7:30 p.m. - Thank You, NEA

Movie Crazy (Clyde Bruckman, Harold Lloyd, US 1932, 84 min., 35mm)

Harold Lloyd was one of the few stars to successfully make the leap from the silent screen to talkies and Movie Crazy is frequently cited as his best sound picture. The film tells the story of a small-town bumpkin who dreams of becoming a famous actor. After a series of mix-ups, the would-be movie star is summoned to Hollywood for a screen test. Once there, he proceeds to wreak havoc on the studio lot, fall in love with the same girl twice, and of course, catch the eye of the studio head who reluctantly recognizes his comic genius. This film showcases Lloyd’s magical charm and further establishes the actor as one of the greats of early screen comedy.

 

Wednesday, August 23, 7:30 p.m. - Thank You, NEA

Saratoga (Jack Conway, US 1937, 92 min., 35mm)

This horse-racing comedy is best remembered today for the death of its star, Jean Harlow. Only 26 at the time, Harlow collapsed on the set of the film and died shortly thereafter. Shooting was completed with a stand-in, cleverly shot from afar or behind hats, and the film was released a mere seven weeks after Harlow’s death. Despite the tragic history of the production, the film became one of 1937’s biggest successes. Saratoga also stars Clark Gable as a charming bookie and Lionel Barrymore as Harlow’s grandfather

 

Thursday, August 24, 7:30 p.m. - America’s Favorite Pastime

Ballplayer: Pelotero (Ross Finkel, Trevor Martin, Jonathan Paley, US/Dominican Republic 2011, 77 min., DCP)

This compelling documentary narrated by John Leguizamo is a gritty and never-before-seen look inside the world of professional baseball training camps in the Dominican Republic. Miguel Angel and Jean Carlos are two of the top prospects at a training camp, and they are both about to turn 16, which means they can be signed to a farm team and ultimately move up to the big leagues. Filmmakers Ross Finkel, Trevor Martin, and Jonathan Paley provide an up-close look at the cost of the American dream.

 

Friday, August 25, 7:30 p.m. - Rochester Premiere

After Love (L’économie du couple, Joachim Lafosse, France/Belgium 2016, 100 min., DCP, French w/subtitles)

From the director of Our Children comes the stark story of Boris (Cédric Kahn) and Marie (Bérénice Bejo), a couple who have decided to separate after fifteen years together. They have two girls that they adore. However, cash-strapped Boris is still living in the family home. When all is said and done, neither of the two is willing to give up. Now this apartment is a war zone and their situation a nightmare. Joachim Lafosse captures with great magnitude the painfully intimate, harrowingly fascinating drama about the emotional and financial complexities of a separation and the end of a long love story. “It’s like Ingmar Bergman’s Scenes from a Marriage, condensed into a shorter timeframe and only a handful of rooms.” – Jordan Mintzer, Hollywood Reporter.

 

Saturday, August 26, 7:30 p.m. - Thank You, NEA

An American in Paris (Vincente Minnelli, US 1951, 113 min., 35mm)

Gerry (Gene Kelly) is an American expatriate living the life of a bohemian painter in post-WWII Paris. Struggling to find success in both art and love, his life is turned upside down when he meets and falls in love with Lise (Leslie Caron). This lavish musical—with its straightforward story, gorgeous dance sequences, and beautiful, frequently melancholic Gershwin score—won the Academy Award for Best Picture. Kelly deservedly gets praise for his skillful and acrobatic dancing, but it’s Oscar Levant, playing his acerbic buddy, who steals the film and gives it a cynical edge that continues to appeal to modern audiences. Also showing: Sunday, August 27, 2 p.m.

 

Sunday, August 27, 2 p.m. - Thank You, NEA

An American in Paris (Vincente Minnelli, US 1951, 113 min., 35mm)

Gerry (Gene Kelly) is an American expatriate living the life of a bohemian painter in post-WWII Paris. Struggling to find success in both art and love, his life is turned upside down when he meets and falls in love with Lise (Leslie Caron). This lavish musical—with its straightforward story, gorgeous dance sequences, and beautiful, frequently melancholic Gershwin score—won the Academy Award for Best Picture. Kelly deservedly gets praise for his skillful and acrobatic dancing, but it’s Oscar Levant, playing his acerbic buddy, who steals the film and gives it a cynical edge that continues to appeal to modern audiences.

 

Monday, August 28, 1:30 p.m. - Senior Matinee—Free for 55+

An American in Paris (Vincente Minnelli, US 1951, 113 min., 35mm)

Gerry (Gene Kelly) is an American expatriate living the life of a bohemian painter in post-WWII Paris. Struggling to find success in both art and love, his life is turned upside down when he meets and falls in love with Lise (Leslie Caron). This lavish musical—with its straightforward story, gorgeous dance sequences, and beautiful, frequently melancholic Gershwin score—won the Academy Award for Best Picture. Kelly deservedly gets praise for his skillful and acrobatic dancing, but it’s Oscar Levant, playing his acerbic buddy, who steals the film and gives it a cynical edge that continues to appeal to modern audiences.

 

Tuesday, August 29, 7:30 p.m. - Thank You, NEA

The Good Earth (Sidney Franklin, Victor Fleming, Gustav Machatý, Sam Wood, US 1937, 138 min., 35mm)

Based on the Pulitzer Prize–winning 1931 novel by Pearl S. Buck, The Good Earth was a high-profile production for MGM. The studio spent nearly three million dollars over a period of three years to bring the story to life in the grandest way possible. Luise Rainer and Paul Muni star as Chinese farmers struggling to provide for their family. Rainer would win her second consecutive Oscar for her role, before leaving the limelight the following year.

 

Wednesday, August 30, 7:30 p.m. - America’s Favorite Pastime

42 (Brian Helgeland, US 2013, 128 min., 35mm)

Uniform number 42 was retired across all of major league baseball in 1997 to honor Jackie Robinson, who ultimately broke the color barrier preventing black players from joining major league rosters. This dramatization of that fateful 1947 season stars Chadwick Boseman as Jackie, who endured endemic racism while leading the Brooklyn Dodgers to the National League pennant, and Harrison Ford as Branch Rickey, the general manager of the Dodgers who hand-picked Robinson. The George Eastman Museum is proud to present one of the few 35mm prints made of this modern classic.

 

Thursday, August 31, 7:30 p.m. - Thank You, NEA

Honolulu (Edward Buzzell, US 1939, 83 min., 35mm)

Switching identities causes a series of mix-ups for the characters in this musical comedy. Robert Young stars in a double role as a movie star and a businessman who look so similar that they decide to switch places. Of course, this causes more problems than it solves. The film also features legendary comedy duo George Burns and Gracie Allen, as well as dancer Eleanor Powell.

# # # 

The George Eastman Museum is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums and is a member of the International Federation of Film Archives.

Address: 900 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14607-2298
Web site: www.eastman.org
Phone: (585) 271-3361

Hours
Museum & Store: Tues.–Sat. 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Closed Mondays, Thanksgiving, and Christmas Day.
Dryden Theatre: Doors open 45 minutes before screenings and events, unless otherwise noted.
Eastman Museum Café: Open Tues.–Sun. during regular museum hours and before film screenings.

Admission & Tickets
General Museum: Members always free. $15 adults, $13 seniors (65+), $5 ages 5-17 and students (with ID). Children 4 & under free with full paid adult admission (does not apply to groups). Free regular admission for EBT or SNAP cardholders and their families, and for active duty military personnel and their families.
Group Rates: Visit eastman.org/group-tours or call (585) 271-3361 ext. 238.
Film Screenings: $8, $6 members, $4 students. Dryden Kids screenings: Children 17 & under free. Unless otherwise noted, tickets available first come, first served at the box office 45 minutes before showtime. Take-10 Passes: Ten discounted Dryden admissions $65, $45 members, $30 students. Available at the box office and Lipson Welcome Center. Valid for regularly priced screenings only.

Special Events
Advance tickets available at eastman.org, the Lipson Welcome Center, or the Dryden box office.

Public Transportation
RTS East Ave. routes 57 & 81; University Ave. route 48

Tours
Docent-led tours of the museum are offered daily (Tues.–Sun.) at the times below. Included w/ museum admission.
Galleries: 1 p.m.
Mansion: Tues.–Sat., 10:30 a.m. & 2 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m.
Garden: May & Sept.: Tues.–Fri. 12 p.m., Sat. & Sun. 12 & 3:30 p.m.; Jun.–Aug.: daily, 12 & 3:30 p.m.
Self-Guided Cell Phone: (585) 563-3496
Self-Tour Scripts: Available at the Lipson Welcome Center.
Sign Language: See calendar for dates.

Accessibility & Interpretation
The Eastman Museum and Dryden Theatre are accessible. Some areas of the historic mansion and gardens have limited wheelchair access. Sign Language Interpretation: Provided with one week’s notice. Call (585) 271-3361 ext. 238. Closed-Captioning: Displayed on media presentations throughout the mansion. Hearing Amplification Devices: A hearing-induction loop system funded by the Hearing Loss Association of America, Rochester Chapter, is installed in the Dryden, and loop receivers are available at the box office. An Infrared System is also available. 

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To download press images for 2017, visit:  https://eastmanmuseum.box.com/PressPhotos